Thursday, April 15, 2021

Lesson 174 - Parts of the Sentence - Review

View lesson on Daily Grammar

Instructions: Using all the knowledge learned in the previous lessons, find the verb, subjects, predicate nominatives, direct objects, appositives, nouns of address, adjectives, predicate adjectives, and adverbs in the following sentences. If there are any adjectives or adverbs, then tell what word they modify.

1. The small children stumbled clumsily and tumbled down.

2. Shortly the weather could be bitterly cold again.

3. Wait here patiently and remain perfectly silent.

4. The chipmunk darted in quickly and instantly grabbed the fallen acorn.

5. The new friend was the tall, handsome boy.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. stumbled/tumbled = verbs; children = subject; the/small = adjectives modifying children; clumsily = adverb modifying stumbled; down = adverb modifying tumbled

2. could be = verb; weather = subject; cold = predicate adjective; shortly/again = adverbs modifying verb; bitterly = adverb modifying cold; the = adjective modifying subject

3. wait/remain = verbs; you (understood) = subject; silent = predicate adjective to verb remain; here/patiently = adverbs modifying wait; perfectly = adverb modifying silent

4. darted/grabbed = verbs; chipmunk = subject; acorn = direct object to verb grabbed; the = adjective modifying chipmunk; the/fallen = adjectives modifying acorn; in/quickly = adverbs modifying darted; instantly = adverb modifying grabbed

5. was = verb; friend = subject; boy = predicate nominative; the/new = adjective modifying friend; the/tall/handsome = adjectives modifying boy


For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html.

Wednesday, April 14, 2021

Lesson 173 - Parts of the Sentence - Review

View lesson on Daily Grammar

Instructions: Using all the knowledge learned in the previous lessons, find the verb, subjects, predicate nominatives, direct objects, appositives, nouns of address, adjectives, and adverbs in the following sentences. If there are any adjectives or adverbs, then tell what word they modify.

1. Ila and I diligently prepared the garden and planted carefully the corn seeds.

2. The legislators are heatedly debating the gun issue.

3. Have you ever seen that beautiful butterfly bush?

4. Eric looked around rather hastily and ran away quickly.

5. Suddenly the siren sounded loudly and sharply.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. prepared/planted = verbs; Ila/I = subjects; garden = direct object to verb prepared; seeds = direct object to verb planted; the = adjective modifying garden; the/corn = adjectives modifying seeds; diligently = adverb modifying prepared; carefully = adverb modifying planted

2. are debating = verb; legislators = subject; issue = direct object; the = adjective modifying legislators; the/gun = adjectives modifying issue; heatedly = adverb modifying verb

3. have seen = verb; you = subject; bush = direct object; that/beautiful/butterfly = adjectives modifying bush; ever = adverb modifying verb

4. looked/ran = verbs; Eric = subject; around/hastily = adverbs modifying looked; rather = adverb modifying hastily; away/quickly = adverbs modifying ran

5. sounded = verb; siren = subject; the = adjective modifying siren; suddenly/loudly/sharply = adverbs modifying sounded



For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html.

Tuesday, April 13, 2021

Lesson 172 - Parts of the Sentence - Review

View lesson on Daily Grammar

Instructions: Using all the knowledge learned in the previous lessons, find the verb, subjects, predicate nominatives, direct objects, appositives, nouns of address, adjectives, predicate adjectives, and adverbs in the following sentences. If there are any adjectives or adverbs, then tell what word they modify.

1. Jerry, I arrived back just now.

2. This building has never seemed especially high before.

3. Today we ate an extremely good grapefruit, our breakfast.

4. A raccoon was busily washing its food.

5. The winding path had become somewhat steep and slightly uneven.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. arrived = verb; I = subject; Jerry = noun of address; back/now = adverbs modifying the verb; just = adverb modifying adverb now

2. has seemed = verb; building = subject; high = predicate adjective modifying subject; this = adjective modifying subject, never/before = adverb modifying verb; especially = adverb modifying adjective high

3. ate = verb; we = subject; grapefruit = direct object; breakfast = appositive; an/good = adjectives modifying grapefruit; our = adjective modifying breakfast; today = adverb modifying verb; extremely = adverb modifying adjective good

4. was washing = verb; raccoon = subject; food = direct object; a = adjective modifying raccoon; its = adjective modifying food; busily = adverb modifying verb

5. had become = verb; path = subject; steep/uneven = predicate adjectives modifying subject; the/winding = adjectives modifying path; somewhat = adverb modifying predicate adjective steep; slightly = adverb modifying predicate adjective uneven



For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html.

Monday, April 12, 2021

Lesson 171 - Parts of the Sentence - Review

View lesson on Daily Grammar

Instructions: Using all the knowledge learned in the previous lessons, identify the words in bold as a verb, noun, pronoun, adjective, or adverb in the following sentences.

1. Did you see the oil well in Canada? Most of us have not been there.

2. I do my assignments well. Jeff is also fast and efficient.

3. Mother drives too fast. Surely she should drive better.

4. This isn't a long diet. Maybe you should fast more often.

5. Have you been here long? Did you come by the back way?

6. I often long for the good old days of the '50's.

7. State Street heads south, the most direct route.

8. Citizens, on most summer days we have a south wind each evening.

9. I once lived in the South. Our family still goes back for visits.

10. This highway is a better road than the dirt one.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. well = noun, most = pronoun

2. well = adverb. fast = adjective

3. fast = adverb, better = adverb

4. this = pronoun, long = adjective, fast = verb

5. long = adverb, back = adjective

6. long = verb

7. south = adverb, most = adverb

8. most = adjective, south = adjective

9. South = noun, back = adverb

10. this = adjective, better = adjective


For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html.

Saturday, April 10, 2021

Quiz for Lessons 166-170 - Parts of the Sentence - Adverbs

View quiz on Daily Grammar

Instructions: Find the adverbs in the following sentences and tell what word they modify.

1. You are almost always the leader.

2. Please turn around slowly, Ted.

3. Now we will try this totally complicated case.

4. Again and again he had been warned about the very extreme weather.

5. Certainly he looks decidedly older in that somewhat dim light.

6. The missing document reappeared suddenly and rather mysteriously.

7. I will never come here again.

8. Pavarotti sings very well.

9. Today you surely will tell a totally truthful story.

10. Almost every answer has been quickly and assuredly given.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. You are almost always the leader.
- almost (how much) modifies the adverb always
- always (when) modifies the verb are 

2. Please turn around slowly, Ted.
- Please (how), around (how), and slowly (how) modify the verb turn

3. Now we will try this totally complicated case.
- Now (when) modifies the verb will try
- totally (how much) modifies the adjective complicated

4. Again and again he had been warned about the very extreme weather.
- again (when) and again (when) modify the verb had been warned
- very (how much) modifies the adjective extreme

5. Certainly he looks decidedly older in that somewhat dim light.
- Certainly (how) modifies the verb looks
- decidedly (how much) modifies the adjective older
- somewhat (how much) modifies the adjective dim

6. The missing document reappeared suddenly and rather mysteriously.
- suddenly (how) and mysteriously (how) modify the verb reappeared
- rather (how much) modifies the adverb mysteriously

7. I will never come here again.
- never (when) and again (when) modify the verb will come
- here (where) modifies the verb will come

8. Pavarotti sings very well.
- well (how) modifies the verb sings
- very (how much) modifies the adverb well 

9. Today you surely will tell a totally truthful story.
- Today (when) modifies the verb will tell
- surely (how) modifies the verb will tell
- totally (how much) modifies the adjective truthful

10. Almost every answer has been quickly and assuredly given.
- quickly (how) and assuredly (how) modify the verb has been given
- Almost (how much) modifies the adjective every


For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html.

Friday, April 9, 2021

Lesson 170 - Parts of the Sentence - Adverbs

View lesson on Daily Grammar
 
Adverbs are words that modify (1) verbs, (2) adjectives, and (3) other adverbs. They tell how (manner), when (time), where (place), how much (degree), and why (cause). 
 
Why is a common one-word adverb that tells why. Adverbs that tell us how, when, where, and why always modify the verb. These adverbs can shift location in the sentence without changing meaning or what they modify. Adverbs that tell us how much modify adjectives or other adverbs. Adverbs that tell how much will come just before the adjectives or adverbs that they modify. These adverbs are also called qualifiers because they strengthen or weaken the words they modify. 
 
Examples: 
He kicked the ball solidly. (how)
He kicked the ball immediately. (when)
He kicked the ball forward. (where)
He kicked the ball too hard. (how much)

Not and its contraction n't are adverbs. They really modify the entire sentence, but we will have them modify the verb as it is the most important word in the sentence. This is a common practice in grammar books.
 
Adverbial objectives or adverbial nouns are nouns used as adverbs. They usually tell amount, weight, time, distance, direction, or value. They can have adjectives modifying them. 
 
Example: 
He waited two days.

Instructions: Find the adverbs in the following sentences and tell what word they modify.

1. The completely exhausted boater was quickly pulled aboard.

2. The manager has called me once or twice about policy.

3. Usually these antibiotics work rather slowly.

4. The Christmas decorations surely weren't very expensive.

5. Harry greedily had too much candy.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. The completely exhausted boater was quickly pulled aboard.
- completely (how much) modifies exhausted
- quickly (how) modifies was pulled
- aboard (where) modifies was pulled

2. The manager has called me once or twice about policy.
- once (when) and twice (when) modify has called

3. Usually these antibiotics work rather slowly.
- Usually (how) and slowly (how) modify work
- rather (how much) modifies slowly

4. The Christmas decorations surely weren't very expensive.
- surely (how) and n't (how) modify were
- very (how much) modifies expensive (predicate adjective)

5. Harry greedily had too much candy.
- greedily (how) modifies had
- too (how much) modifies much


For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html.

Thursday, April 8, 2021

Lesson 169 - Parts of the Sentence - Adverbs

View lesson on Daily Grammar

Adverbs are words that modify (1) verbs, (2) adjectives, and (3) other adverbs. They tell how (manner), when (time), where (place), how much (degree), and why (cause). 
 
Why is a common one-word adverb that tells why. Adverbs that tell us how, when, where, and why always modify the verb. These adverbs can shift location in the sentence without changing meaning or what they modify. Adverbs that tell us how much modify adjectives or other adverbs. Adverbs that tell how much will come just before the adjectives or adverbs that they modify. These adverbs are also called qualifiers because they strengthen or weaken the words they modify. 
 
Examples: 
He kicked the ball solidly. (how)
He kicked the ball immediately. (when)
He kicked the ball forward. (where)
He kicked the ball too hard. (how much)

Not and its contraction n't are adverbs. They really modify the entire sentence, but we will have them modify the verb as it is the most important word in the sentence. This is a common practice in grammar books.
 
Adverbial objectives or adverbial nouns are nouns used as adverbs. They usually tell amount, weight, time, distance, direction, or value. They can have adjectives modifying them. 
 
Example: 
He waited two days.

Instructions: Find the adverbs in the following sentences and tell what word they modify.

1. I am too tired to play.

2. I am very sorry about your extremely sore leg.

3. The storm was almost completely over at noon.

4. You look so much better.

5. Your father looks rather feeble.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. I am too tired to play.
- too (how much) modifies tired (predicate adjective)

2. I am very sorry about your extremely sore leg.
- very (how much) modifies sorry (predicate adjective)
- extremely (how much) modifies sore

3. The storm was almost completely over at noon.
- almost (how much) modifies completely
- completely (how much) modifies over (predicate adjective)

4. You look so much better.
- so (how much) modifies much
- much (how much) modifies better (predicate adjective)

5. Your father looks rather feeble.
- rather (how much) modifies feeble (predicate adjective)


For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html.

Wednesday, April 7, 2021

Lesson 168 - Parts of the Sentence - Adverbs

View lesson on Daily Grammar

Adverbs are words that modify (1) verbs, (2) adjectives, and (3) other adverbs. They tell how (manner), when (time), where (place), how much (degree), and why (cause). 
 
Why is a common one-word adverb that tells why. Adverbs that tell us how, when, where, and why always modify the verb. These adverbs can shift location in the sentence without changing meaning or what they modify. Adverbs that tell us how much modify adjectives or other adverbs. Adverbs that tell how much will come just before the adjectives or adverbs that they modify. These adverbs are also called qualifiers because they strengthen or weaken the words they modify. 
 
Examples: 
He kicked the ball solidly. (how)
He kicked the ball immediately. (when)
He kicked the ball forward. (where)
He kicked the ball too hard. (how much)

Not and its contraction n't are adverbs. They really modify the entire sentence, but we will have them modify the verb as it is the most important word in the sentence. This is a common practice in grammar books.
 
Adverbial objectives or adverbial nouns are nouns used as adverbs. They usually tell amount, weight, time, distance, direction, or value. They can have adjectives modifying them. 
 
Example: 
He waited two days.

Instructions: Find the adverbs in the following sentences and tell what word they modify.

1. Do you live here?

2. Should we play inside or outside?

3. Where is your coat, young man?

4. From the sound the bears must be nearby.

5. There he goes.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. Do you live here?
- here (where) modifies do live
 
2. Should we play inside or outside?
- inside (where) and outside (where) modify should play

3. Where is your coat, young man?
- Where (where) modifies is

4. From the sound the bears must be nearby.
- nearby (where) modifies must be

5. There he goes.
- There (where) modifies goes


For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html.

Tuesday, April 6, 2021

Lesson 167 - Parts of the Sentence - Adverbs

View lesson on Daily Grammar

Adverbs are words that modify (1) verbs, (2) adjectives, and (3) other adverbs. They tell how (manner), when (time), where (place), how much (degree), and why (cause). 
 
Why is a common one-word adverb that tells why. Adverbs that tell us how, when, where, and why always modify the verb. These adverbs can shift location in the sentence without changing meaning or what they modify. Adverbs that tell us how much modify adjectives or other adverbs. Adverbs that tell how much will come just before the adjectives or adverbs that they modify. These adverbs are also called qualifiers because they strengthen or weaken the words they modify. 
 
Examples: 
He kicked the ball solidly. (how)
He kicked the ball immediately. (when)
He kicked the ball forward. (where)
He kicked the ball too hard. (how much)

Not and its contraction n't are adverbs. They really modify the entire sentence, but we will have them modify the verb as it is the most important word in the sentence. This is a common practice in grammar books.

Instructions: Find the adverbs in the following sentences and tell what word they modify.

1. Now and then I become creative.

2. Soon you will see that sight again.

3. He made the corrections on the computer immediately.

4. Sometimes you make unnecessary statements.

5. Lately I take walks often.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. Now and then I become creative.
- now (when) and then (when) modify become

2. Soon you will see that sight again.
- soon (when) and again (when) modify will see

3. He made the corrections on the computer immediately.
- immediately (when) modifies made

4. Sometimes you make unnecessary statements.
- sometimes (when) modifies make

5. Lately I take walks often.
- lately (when) and often (when) modify take


For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html.

Monday, April 5, 2021

Lesson 166 - Parts of the Sentence - Adverbs

View lesson on Daily Grammar

Adverbs are words that modify (1) verbs, (2) adjectives, and (3) other adverbs. They tell how (manner), when (time), where (place), how much (degree), and why (cause). 
 
Why is a common one-word adverb that tells why. Adverbs that tell us how, when, where, and why always modify the verb. These adverbs can shift location in the sentence without changing meaning or what they modify. Adverbs that tell us how much modify adjectives or other adverbs. Adverbs that tell how much will come just before the adjectives or adverbs that they modify. These adverbs are also called qualifiers because they strengthen or weaken the words they modify. 
 
Examples: 
He kicked the ball solidly. (how)
He kicked the ball immediately. (when)
He kicked the ball forward. (where)
He kicked the ball too hard. (how much)

Not and its contraction n't are adverbs. They really modify the entire sentence, but we will have them modify the verb as it is the most important word in the sentence. This is a common practice in grammar books.

Instructions: Find the adverbs in the following sentences and tell what word they modify.

1. The student angrily left the room.

2. Carefully Barbara backed the car from the driveway.

3. That family works well together.

4. Slowly but boldly the soldiers approached the fortress.

5. The organization unanimously voted to assist in the effort.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. The student angrily left the room. 
- angrily (how) modifies left

2. Carefully Barbara backed the car from the driveway.
- carefully (how) modifies backed

3. That family works well together.
- well (how) and together (how) modify works

4. Slowly but boldly the soldiers approached the fortress.
- slowly (how) and boldly (how) modify approached

5. The organization unanimously voted to assist in the effort.
- unanimously (how) modifies voted


For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html.

Saturday, April 3, 2021

Quiz for Lessons 161-165 - Parts of the Sentence - Adverbs

View quiz on Daily Grammar

Instructions: Find the adverbs in the following sentences and tell what word they modify.

1. The pancakes are almost ready.

2. The student answered the teacher nervously but clearly.

3. The tour will leave early today.

4. I am still unusually tired by afternoon.

5. The stranded hiker quietly gave up the chance of rescue.

6. Yesterday our fullback fumbled twice in the game.

7. Why couldn't you blow out your candles?

8. My little brother almost always eats the most at dinner.

9. Haven't you ridden your new motor bike yet?

10. Your essay was written very neatly and legibly.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. The pancakes are almost ready.
- almost modifies ready

2. The student answered the teacher nervously but clearly.
- nervously and clearly modify answered

3. The tour will leave early today.
- early and today modify will leave

4. I am still unusually tired by afternoon.
- still modifies am
- unusually modifies tired

5. The stranded hiker quietly gave up the chance of rescue.
- quietly and up modify gave

6. Yesterday our fullback fumbled twice in the game.
- Yesterday and twice modify fumbled

7. Why couldn't you blow out your candles?
- Why, n't, and out modify could blow

8. My little brother almost always eats the most at dinner.
- always modifies eats
- almost modifies the adverb always

9. Haven't you ridden your new motor bike yet?
- n't and yet modify have ridden

10. Your essay was written very neatly and legibly.
- neatly and legibly modify was written
- very modifies neatly (possibly legibly also)



For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html.

Friday, April 2, 2021

Lesson 165 - Parts of the Sentence - Adverbs

View lesson on Daily Grammar

Adverbs are words that modify (1) verbs, (2) adjectives, and (3) other adverbs. They tell how (manner), when (time), where (place), how much (degree), and why (cause). 
 
Why is a common one-word adverb that tells why. Adverbs that tell us how, when, where, and why always modify the verb. These adverbs can shift location in the sentence without changing meaning or what they modify. Adverbs that tell us how much modify adjectives or other adverbs. Adverbs that tell how much will come just before the adjectives or adverbs that they modify. These adverbs are also called qualifiers because they strengthen or weaken the words they modify. 
 
Examples: 
He kicked the ball solidly. (how)
He kicked the ball immediately. (when)
He kicked the ball forward. (where)
He kicked the ball too hard. (how much)

Not and its contraction n't are adverbs. They really modify the entire sentence, but we will have them modify the verb as it is the most important word in the sentence. This is a common practice in grammar books.

Adverbial objectives or adverbial nouns are nouns used as adverbs. They usually tell amount, weight, time, distance, direction, or value. They can have adjectives modifying them. 
 
Example: 
He waited two days.

Instructions: Find the adverbs in the following sentences and tell what word they modify.

1. This suitcase weighs a ton.

2. The grandchildren happily swung back and forth in the swing.

3. The climber edged slowly and carefully along the ledge.

4. He is a rather bashful person.

5. Every afternoon the baby cries very forcefully for food.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. This suitcase weighs a ton.
- ton modifies weighs

2. The grandchildren happily swung back and forth in the swing.
- happily, back, and forth modify swung

3. The climber edged slowly and carefully along the ledge.
- slowly and carefully modify edged

4. He is a rather bashful person.
- rather modifies bashful

5. Every afternoon the baby cries very forcefully for food.
- afternoon and forcefully modify cries 
- very modifies forcefully



For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html.

Thursday, April 1, 2021

Lesson 164 - Parts of the Sentence - Adverbs

View lesson on Daily Grammar

Adverbs are words that modify (1) verbs, (2) adjectives, and (3) other adverbs. They tell how (manner), when (time), where (place), how much (degree), and why (cause). 
 
Why is a common one-word adverb that tells why. Adverbs that tell us how, when, where, and why always modify the verb. These adverbs can shift location in the sentence without changing meaning or what they modify. Adverbs that tell us how much modify adjectives or other adverbs. Adverbs that tell how much will come just before the adjectives or adverbs that they modify. These adverbs are also called qualifiers because they strengthen or weaken the words they modify. 
 
Examples: 
He kicked the ball solidly. (how)
He kicked the ball immediately. (when)
He kicked the ball forward. (where)
He kicked the ball too hard. (how much)

Not and its contraction n't are adverbs. They really modify the entire sentence, but we will have them modify the verb as it is the most important word in the sentence. This is a common practice in grammar books.

Adverbial objectives or adverbial nouns are nouns used as adverbs. They usually tell amount, weight, time, distance, direction, or value. They can have adjectives modifying them. 
 
Example: 
He waited two days.

Instructions: Find the adverbial nouns in the following sentences and tell what word they modify.

1. Yesterday Jim came home.

2. Tomorrow I will walk a mile.

3. The boulder landed three feet from me.

4. Will works mornings and nights.

5. This package cost five dollars.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. Yesterday Jim came home.
- Yesterday and home modify came

2. Tomorrow I will walk a mile.
- Tomorrow and mile modify will walk

3. The boulder landed three feet from me.
- feet modifies landed

4. Will works mornings and nights.
- mornings and nights modify works

5. This package cost five dollars.
- dollars modifies cost



For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html.