Saturday, August 17, 2019

Quiz for Lessons 256 - 260 - Parts of the Sentence - Adjective Clauses

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Instructions: Combine the following sentences using an adjective clause using the introductory words who, whose, whom, which, that, when, and where.

1. The occasion was a momentous one for all. All the family were together at last.

2. The site has several steep slopes. The million-dollar home will be built there.

3. The time was very exciting. Our team won the championship.

4. The author wrote the novel. He received a Pulitzer Prize.

5. I recall the time. There was no freeway to Salt Lake City then.

Instructions: Rewrite the following sentences placing the adjective clause in the correct place.

6. The little dog was running behind the boy that was growling and barking fiercely.

7. The trunk of the passenger was placed on the train which was covered with travel stickers.

8. A dog ran onto the football field which looked like the team mascot.

9. The car is now in our garage that was in a wreck yesterday.

10. The crickets were the targets of our poison bait which were destroying our crops.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. The occasion when all the family were together at last was a momentous one for all.

2. The site where the million-dollar home will be built has several steep slopes.

3. The time when our team won the championship was very exciting.

4. The author who received a Pulitzer Prize wrote the novel.

5. I recall the time when there was no freeway to Salt Lake City.

6. The little dog that was growling and barking fiercely was running behind the boy.

7. The passenger's trunk which was covered with travel stickers was placed on the train.

8. A dog which looked like the team mascot ran onto the football field.

9. The car that was in a wreck yesterday is now in our garage.

10. The crickets which were destroying our crops were the targets of our poison bait.



For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html.

Friday, August 16, 2019

Lesson 260 - Parts of the Sentence - Adjective Clauses

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In using an adjective clause, you should always place it as near to the word it modifies as possible. If you misplace the adjective clause, it makes a ridiculous sentence or one that is unclear. Examples: (incorrect) = I waved to my dog from the car that had just licked my face. (The car did not lick my face; the dog did.) (correct) = From the car I waved to my dog that had just licked my face. (Now the clause is as close as it can be to the word it modifies. That is next to dog.)

Instructions: Rewrite the following sentences placing the adjective clause in the correct place.

1. The tall man was stopped by a police officer who had been acting suspiciously.

2. We found the key under the couch that had been lost.

3. She took the letter to the post office which she had written earlier.

4. The rosebush is next to a weedy lot that is very beautiful.

5. The tanker sailed into the harbor which was carrying a load of oil.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. The tall man who had been acting suspiciously was stopped by a police officer.

2. We found the key that had been lost under the couch.

3. She took the letter which she had written earlier to the post office.

4. The rosebush that is very beautiful is next to a weedy lot.

5. The tanker which was carrying a load of oil sailed into the harbor.



For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html.

Thursday, August 15, 2019

Lesson 259 - Parts of the Sentence - Adjective Clauses

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In using an adjective clause, you should always place it as near to the word it modifies as possible. If you misplace the adjective clause, it makes a ridiculous sentence or one that is unclear. Examples: (incorrect) = I waved to my dog from the car that had just licked my face. (The car did not lick my face; the dog did.) (correct) = From the car I waved to my dog that had just licked my face. (Now the clause is as close as it can be to the word it modifies. That is next to dog.)

Instructions: Rewrite the following sentences placing the adjective clause in the correct place.

1. They drove to the lake in their new car where they love to fish for bass.

2. The large limousine pulled up to the curb which was loaded with students for the prom.

3. The new tricycle was smashed on the driveway that had been delivered yesterday.

4. We showed the pictures to our friends that we had taken at the wedding.

5. We caught several fish with the new bait which we cooked for dinner.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. They drove in their new car to the lake where they love to fish for bass.

2. The large limousine which was loaded with students for the prom pulled up to the curb.

3. The new tricycle that had been delivered yesterday was smashed on the driveway.

4. We showed to our friends the pictures that we had taken at the wedding.

5. We caught with the new bait several fish which we cooked for dinner.



For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html.

Wednesday, August 14, 2019

Lesson 258 - Parts of the Sentence - Adjective Clauses

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Using the various kinds of clauses as with the use of the verbals can give variety to your sentences. Adjective clauses can be used that way.

Instructions: Combine the following sentences using an adjective clause using the introductory words who, whose, whom, which, that, when, and where.

1. The school has been closed. The students were exposed to asbestos there.

2. The clinic processed the MRI. The MRI showed my back problem.

3. Joe contacted the artist. The artist was going to paint his portrait.

4. The hour went by very slowly. We were waiting for their arrival.

5. The children were lost there. I found them in the woods.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. The school where the students were exposed to asbestos has been closed.

2. The clinic processed the MRI which showed my back problem.

3. Joe contacted the artist that was going to paint his portrait.

4. The hour when we were waiting for their arrival went by very slowly.

5. The children whom I found in the woods were lost there.



For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html.

Tuesday, August 13, 2019

Lesson 257 - Parts of the Sentence - Adjective Clauses

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Using the various kinds of clauses as with the use of the verbals can give variety to your sentences. Adjective clauses can be used that way.

Instructions: Combine the following sentences using an adjective clause using the introductory words who, whose, whom, which, that, when, and where.

1. They followed the strange man. He had just come from the dark alley.

2. The lot is covered with salt grass. We play baseball there.

3. A minute passed in complete silence. Terri announced her wedding plans then.

4. The newspaper had been delivered late. It is the one I receive.

5. I bought Jim a book. The book is about magic.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. They followed the strange man who had just come from the dark alley.

2. The lot where we play baseball is covered with salt grass.

3. A minute when Terri announced her wedding plans passed in complete silence.

4. The newspaper that I receive had been delivered late.

5. I bought Jim a book which is about magic.



For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html.

Monday, August 12, 2019

Lesson 256 - Parts of the Sentence - Adjective Clauses

View lesson on Daily Grammar

Using the various kinds of clauses as with the use of the verbals can give variety to your sentences. Adjective clauses can be used that way.

Instructions: Combine the following sentences using an adjective clause using the introductory words who, whose, whom, which, that, when and where.

1. The doctor examined the patient. The patient had fallen from a cliff.

2. The mechanic repaired my sister's car. The car had a warped block.

3. The restaurant had closed permanently. The customers were shot there.

4. The day was a wonderful day. Terri was married on that day.

5. The parents had great respect for the teacher. The teacher had taught their children.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. The doctor examined the patient who had fallen from a cliff.

2. The mechanic repaired my sister's car that had a warped block.

3. The restaurant where the customers were shot had closed permanently.

4. The day was a wonderful day when Terri was married.

5. The parents had great respect for the teacher who had taught their children.



For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html.

Saturday, August 10, 2019

Quiz for Lesson 251 - 255 - Parts of the Sentence - Adjective Clauses

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A complex sentence is made up of an independent clause and a dependent clause. Example: The television was playing (independent clause which can stand alone and make sense) as I left the room (dependent clause which must be attached to the independent clause to make sense). There are three kinds of dependent clauses: adjective clause, adverb clause and noun clause.

The adjective clause is used to modify a noun or a pronoun. It will begin with a relative pronoun (who, whose, whom, which, and that) or a subordinate conjunction (when and where). Those are the only words that can be used to introduce an adjective clause. The introductory word will always rename the word that it follows and modifies except when used with a preposition which will come between the introductory word and the word it renames. Examples: The student whose hand was up gave the wrong answer. Whose hand was up is the adjective clause with whose, the relative pronoun, renaming and modifying student. Jane is a person in whom I can place my confidence. In whom I can place my confidence is the adjective clause with whom, the relative pronoun, with the preposition in between it and person, the word that whom renames and
modifies.

Instructions: Find the adjective clause in the following sentences and tell which word it modifies.

1. I like a leader who listens to his men.

2. The dog which I loved dearly was hit by a truck last night.

3. Rulon is a person who takes responsibility well.

4. All individuals who purchased tickets will be admitted.

5. The shirt that you bought me doesn't fit well.

6. The woman who baked the winning pie is my wife.

7. You called at a time when I was unable to answer.

8. Gayle is the one for whom you are looking.

9. Those who are willing to serve others will be rewarded.

10. One to whom much is given is expected to give much in return.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. who listens to his men modifies leader

2. which I loved dearly modifies dog

3. who takes responsibility well modifies person

4. who purchased tickets modifies individual;

5. that you bought me modifies shirt

6. who baked the winning pie modifies woman

7. when I was unable to answer modifies time

8. for whom you are looking modifies one

9. who are willing to serve others modifies those

10. to whom much is given modifies one



For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html.

Friday, August 9, 2019

Lesson 255 - Parts of the Sentence - Adjective Clauses

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A complex sentence is made up of an independent clause and a dependent clause. Example: The television was playing (independent clause which can stand alone and make sense) as I left the room (dependent clause which must be attached to the independent clause to make sense). There are three kinds of dependent clauses: adjective clause, adverb clause and noun clause.

The adjective clause is used to modify a noun or a pronoun. It will begin with a relative pronoun (who, whose, whom, which, and that) or a subordinate conjunction (when and where). Those are the only words that can be used to introduce an adjective clause. The introductory word will always rename the word that it follows and modifies except when used with a preposition which will come between the introductory word and the word it renames. Examples: The student whose hand was up gave the wrong answer. Whose hand was up is the adjective clause with whose, the relative pronoun, renaming and modifying student. Jane is a person in whom I can place my confidence. In whom I can place my confidence is the adjective clause with whom, the relative pronoun, with the preposition in between it and person, the word that whom renames and modifies.

Instructions: Find the adjective clause in the following sentences and tell which word it modifies.

1. This is a matter about which there was much discussion.

2. It is the man on your left who will be the next principal.

3. The car whose license plate I could not read sped quickly away.

4. Did you find the opening where the sheep got through?

5. The man whom you admire greatly will be the next speaker.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. about which there was much discussion modifies matter

2. who will be the next principal modifies man (prepositional phrase again separating the word renamed)

3. whose license plate I could not read modifies car

4. where the sheep got through modifies opening

5. whom you admire greatly modifies man



For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html.

Thursday, August 8, 2019

Lesson 254 - Parts of the Sentence - Adjective Clauses

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A complex sentence is made up of an independent clause and a dependent clause. Example: The television was playing (independent clause which can stand alone and make sense) as I left the room (dependent clause which must be attached to the independent clause to make sense). There are three kinds of dependent clauses: adjective clause, adverb clause and noun clause.

The adjective clause is used to modify a noun or a pronoun. It will begin with a relative pronoun (who, whose, whom, which, and that) or a subordinate conjunction (when and where). Those are the only words that can be used to introduce an adjective clause. The introductory word will always rename the word that it follows and modifies except when used with a preposition which will come between the introductory word and the word it renames. Examples: The student whose hand was up gave the wrong answer. Whose hand was up is the adjective clause with whose, the relative pronoun, renaming and modifying student. Jane is a person in whom I can place my confidence. In whom I can place my confidence is the adjective clause with whom, the relative pronoun, with the preposition in between it and person, the word that whom renames and modifies.

Instructions: Find the adjective clause in the following sentences and tell which word it modifies.

1. Will you thaw the pizza that is in the freezer?

2. I am looking for the person who owns this car.

3. I remember well the time when I broke my leg.

4. I want to ride a horse which is very tame.

5. We must find a person whose honesty is above reproach.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. that is in the freezer modifies pizza

2. who owns this car modifies person

3. when I broke my leg modifies time

4. which is very tame modifies horse

5. whose honesty is above reproach modifies person



For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html.

Wednesday, August 7, 2019

Lesson 253 - Parts of the Sentence - Adjective Clauses

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A complex sentence is made up of an independent clause and a dependent clause. Example: The television was playing (independent clause which can stand alone and make sense) as I left the room (dependent clause which must be attached to the independent clause to make sense). There are three kinds of dependent clauses: adjective clause, adverb clause and noun clause.

The adjective clause is used to modify a noun or a pronoun. It will begin with a relative pronoun (who, whose, whom, which, and that) or a subordinate conjunction (when and where). Those are the only words that can be used to introduce an adjective clause. The introductory word will always rename the word that it follows and modifies except when used with a preposition which will come between the introductory word and the word it renames. Examples: The student whose hand was up gave the wrong answer. Whose hand was up is the adjective clause with whose, the relative pronoun, renaming and modifying student. Jane is a person in whom I can place my confidence. In whom I can place my confidence is the adjective clause with whom, the relative pronoun, with the preposition in between it and person, the word that whom renames and modifies.

Instructions: Find the adjective clause in the following sentences and tell which word it modifies.

1. The ride that we rode at the amusement park was very scary.

2. Here is the place where the plane wrecked.

3. The diamond in that ring that Mark bought was gigantic.

4. The dress that the Queen is wearing weighs fifty pounds.

5. The student whose hand was raised shouted out the answer.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. that we rode at the amusement park modifies ride

2. where the plane wrecked modifies place

3. that Mark bought modifies ring

4. that the Queen is wearing modifies dress

5. whose hand was raised modifies student



For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html.

Tuesday, August 6, 2019

Lesson 252 - Parts of the Sentence - Adjective Clauses

View lesson on Daily Grammar

A complex sentence is made up of an independent clause and a dependent clause. Example: The television was playing (independent clause which can stand alone and make sense) as I left the room (dependent clause which must be attached to the independent clause to make sense). There are three kinds of dependent clauses: adjective clause, adverb clause and noun clause.

The adjective clause is used to modify a noun or a pronoun. It will begin with a relative pronoun (who, whose, whom, which, and that) or a subordinate conjunction (when and where). Those are the only words that can be used to introduce an adjective clause. The introductory word will always rename the word that it follows and modifies except when used with a preposition which will come between the introductory word and the word it renames. Examples: The student whose hand was up gave the wrong answer. Whose hand was up is the adjective clause with whose, the relative pronoun, renaming and modifying student. Jane is a person in whom I can place my confidence. In whom I can place my confidence is the adjective clause with whom, the relative pronoun, with the preposition in between it and person, the word that whom renames and modifies.

Instructions: Find the adjective clause in the following sentences and tell which word it modifies.

1. The singer that you see on stage is my sister.

2. The owner is a woman by whom many things have been accomplished.

3. The teacher who gives the girls piano lessons lives next door.

4. The man whose leg was broken was taken to the hospital.

5. This is the place where the Donner Party perished.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. that you see on stage modifies singer

2. by whom many things have been accomplished modifies woman

3. who gives the girls piano lessons modifies teacher

4. whose leg was broken modifies man

5. where the Donner Party perished modifies place



For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html.

Monday, August 5, 2019

Lesson 251 - Parts of the Sentence - Adjective Clauses

View lesson on Daily Grammar

A complex sentence is made up of an independent clause and a dependent clause. Example: The television was playing (independent clause which can stand alone and make sense) as I left the room (dependent clause which must be attached to the independent clause to make sense). There are three kinds of dependent clauses: adjective clause, adverb clause and noun clause.

The adjective clause is used to modify a noun or a pronoun. It will begin with a relative pronoun (who, whose, whom, which, and that) or a subordinate conjunction (when and where). Those are the only words that can be used to introduce an adjective clause. The introductory word will always rename the word that it follows and modifies except when used with a preposition which will come between the introductory word and the word it renames. Examples: The student whose hand was up gave the wrong answer. Whose hand was up is the adjective clause with whose, the relative pronoun, renaming and modifying student. Jane is a person in whom I can place my confidence. In whom I can place my confidence is the adjective clause with whom, the relative pronoun, with the preposition in between it and person, the word that whom renames and modifies.

Instructions: Find the adjective clause in the following sentences and tell which word it modifies.

1. I play a kind of music that nobody likes.

2. The man whom you saw was not the famous actor.

3. I remember the day when I took my first airplane ride.

4. I have a neighbor whose parents live in Australia.

5. The hint that I learned about cleaning the walk saved me much work.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. that nobody likes modifies either music or kind (a prepositional phrase can separate the introductory word from the word it modifies)

2. whom you saw modifies man

3. when I took my first airplane ride modifies day

4. whose parents live in Australia modifies neighbor

5. that I learned about cleaning the walk modifies hint



For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html.

Saturday, August 3, 2019

Quiz for Lessons 246 - 250 - Parts of the Sentence - Compound Sentences

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Instructions: Tell whether the words in quotation marks are independent clauses, dependent clauses, prepositional phrases, participial phrases, gerund phrases, or infinitive phrases.

1. Do not leave for help "until I signal you."

2. "Here are the plants" that you wanted.

3. I remained "staring at the damage" when help arrived.

4. "Having learned the outcome," I was at a loss "to know what to do."

5. The neighbors stared "at me" in unbelief.

Instructions: Combine the following sentences with the appropriate co-ordinate conjunctions.

6. I turned on my radio. There was no sound.

7. The storm had ended. The sun peeked out from the clouds.

8. I did not attend the meeting. John didn't either.

9. You must leave soon. You will be late for class.

10. A phrase has neither a verb nor a subject. The clause has both.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. until I signal you = dependent clause

2. Here are the plants = independent clause

3. staring at the damage = participial phrase

4. Having learned the outcome = participial phrase, to know what to do = infinitive phrase

5. at me = prepositional phrase

6. I turned on the radio, but there was no sound.

7. The storm had ended, and the sun peeked out from the clouds.

8. I did not attend the meeting, nor did John.

9. You must leave soon, or you will be late for class.

10. A phrase has neither a verb nor a subject, but the clause has both.



For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html.

Friday, August 2, 2019

Lesson 250 - Parts of the Sentence - Compound Sentences

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A clause is a group of words having a subject and a verb. An independent clause can stand alone as a sentence. A dependent clause is always used as some part of speech. It can be an adjective, adverb, or noun. It cannot stand alone as a sentence.

A phrase is a group of words used as a sentence part. It does not have a subject and a verb. It can be a noun, adjective or adverb. We have studied the following phrases: prepositional, gerund, participial, and infinitive.

A compound sentence combines two or more independent clauses. Commas separate the clauses of a compound sentence. (A short sentence joined by and is sometimes combined without a comma.) Example: She talks and he listens. A semicolon can take the place of the conjunction and comma. Only clauses closely related in thought should be joined to make a compound sentence.

Instructions: Tell whether the words in quotation marks are independent clauses, dependent clauses, prepositional phrases, participial phrases, gerund phrases, or infinitive phrases.

1. "When I received the email," I knew it was "not to be opened."

2. When you go to the store, "buy some ice cream and cookies."

3. The vase must have been broken "by the grandchildren."

4. "Having been left alone," the boy jumped at every noise.

5. "Planning a successful wedding" requires lots of work.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. When I received the email = dependent clause, not to be opened = infinitive phrase

2. buy some ice cream and cookies = independent clause

3. by the grandchildren = prepositional phrase

4. Having been left alone = participial phrase

5. Planning a successful wedding = gerund phrase



For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html.