Tuesday, February 18, 2020

Lesson 392 - Mechanics - Punctuation - Colons

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Use a colon to separate two complete sentences when the second sentence explains, amplifies, or illustrates the first. Example: Jim had a good idea: He wanted to consult with the builder.

Instructions: Place colons where needed.

1. There has been no change in our plans. We will leave at 1000 P.M.

2. He stated his plans. He would borrow money; he would secure a plane; he would fly around the world.

3. That morning the people saw the problem. During the night a tree had downed the power lines.

4. Now the men knew what to do. The pressure would be increased in the forward compartment.

5. They were worried about Fred. He would fall asleep at work and spend too much time alone.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. There has been no change in our plans: We will leave at 10:00 P.M. (two colons)

2. He stated his plans: He would borrow money; he would secure a plane; he would fly around the world.

3. That morning the people saw the problem: During the night a tree had downed the power lines.

4. Now the men knew what to do: The pressure would be increased in the forward compartment.

5. They were worried about Fred: He would fall asleep at work and spend too much time alone.



For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html.

Monday, February 17, 2020

Lesson 391 - Mechanics - Punctuation - Colons

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Use a colon before listed items that are introduced by such words as the following, as follows, thus, and these; by a number; or by any other expression that "points-out." Example: In high school he played the following sports: baseball, basketball, football, and tennis.

Use no colon before a list of predicate nominatives, direct objects, or objects of the preposition. A colon should not hinder the natural flow of the sentence. Example: We will need flour, milk, and sugar. (direct objects)

Instructions: Place colons where needed.

1. You need these guys Will, Boyd, Jeff, and Jim.

2. She had three personality flaws pride, selfishness, and a temper.

3. The singers will be you, Pam, and Becky.

4. For the camp-out we will need the following things a tent, three sleeping bags, and a gas lantern.

5. Next semester I will be taking four courses Algebra II, English Literature, American History, and Biology III.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. You need these guys: Will, Boyd, Jeff, and Jim.

2. She had three personality flaws: pride, selfishness, and a temper.

3. No colon needed. They are predicate nominatives

4. For the camp-out we will need the following things: a tent, three sleeping bags, and a gas lantern.

5. Next semester I will be taking four courses: Algebra II, English Literature, American History, and Biology III.



For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html.

Saturday, February 15, 2020

Quiz for Lessons 386 - 390 - Mechanics - Punctuation - Colons

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Instructions: Place colons where needed.

1. That statement can be found in Volume I pages 98-100 of The Raven The Life of Sam Houston.

2. Dear Harmon's

3. I like what it says in James 520.

4. Dear Sirs

5. I will be here at 1200 P.M. for my money.

6. I enjoyed reading The Army of the Potomac A Stillness at Appomattox by Bruce Catton.

7. I couldn't find it in Volume IX pages 3-6.

8. Thanksgiving dinner will be at our place at 230 P.M.

9. A good college text was The American Constitution Its Origins and Development.

10. Revelation 62-8 talks about the four horsemen of the apocalypse.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. That statement can be found in Volume I: pages 98-100 of The Raven: The Life of Sam Houston.

2. Dear Harmon's:

3. I like what it says in James 5:20.

4. Dear Sirs:

5. I will be here at 12:00 P.M. for my money.

6. I enjoyed reading The Army of the Potomac: A Stillness at Appomattox by Bruce Catton.

7. I couldn't find it in Volume IX: pages 3-6.

8. Thanksgiving dinner will be at our place at 2:30 P.M.

9. A good college text was The American Constitution: Its Origins and Development.

10. Revelation 6:2-8 talks about the four horsemen of the apocalypse.



For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html.

Friday, February 14, 2020

Lesson 390 - Mechanics - Punctuation - Colons

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Use a colon between the numbers referring to volume and the pages of books and magazines. Example: It is found in Volume II: pages 22-23.

Instructions: Place colons where needed.

1. That statement can be found in Volume X pages 198-200.

2. I found that information in Volume 54 pages 31-34.

3. Look in that magazine Volume 24 pages 3-4.

4. Volume VI pages 245-247 will have the information that you need.

5. Check the encyclopedia Volume 20 pages 105 -106.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. That statement can be found in Volume X: pages 198-200.

2. I found that information in Volume 54: pages 31-34.

3. Look in that magazine Volume 24: pages 3-4.

4. Volume VI: pages 245-247 will have the information that you need.

5. Check the encyclopedia Volume 20: pages 105 -106.



For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html.

Thursday, February 13, 2020

Lesson 389 - Mechanics - Punctuation - Colons

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Use a colon between the title and subtitle of a book. Example: The Wide World: A High School Geography

Instructions: Place colons where needed.

1. Have you examined for possible adoption Warriner's English Grammar and Composition Complete Course?

2. The Advanced Composition A Book of Models for Writing has been used for many years.

3. I didn't like Episodes in American History An Inquiry Approach as a history text.

4. Men and Nations A World History covers what we need very well.

5. The American Nation A History of the United States seems too advanced for our grade level.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. Have you examined for possible adoption Warriner's English Grammar and Composition: Complete Course?

2. The Advanced Composition: A Book of Models for Writing has been used for many years.

3. I didn't like Episodes in American History: An Inquiry Approach as a history text.

4. Men and Nations: A World History covers what we need very well.

5. The American Nation: A History of the United States seems too advanced for our grade level.



For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html.

Wednesday, February 12, 2020

Lesson 388 - Mechanics - Punctuation - Colons

View lesson on Daily Grammar

Use a colon to separate chapter and verse referring to a specific Bible selection. Example: Everyone should follow Proverbs 3:5.

Instructions: Place colons where needed.

1. What is the meaning of Job 5 7?

2. Micah 6 8 is an often quoted verse.

3. Isaiah 9 6 is a verse used at Christmas time.

4. I think that Malachi 3 10 is ignored by most of the Christian world.

5. One of my favorite verses is Matthew 6 33.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. What is the meaning of Job 5:7?

2. Micah 6:8 is an often quoted verse.

3. Isaiah 9:6 is a verse used at Christmas time.

4. I think that Malachi 3:10 is ignored by most of the Christian world.

5. One of my favorite verses is Matthew 6:33.



For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html.

Tuesday, February 11, 2020

Lesson 387 - Mechanics - Punctuation - Colons

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Use a colon to express the hours and minutes in figures. Example: 12:30 A.M.

Instructions: Place colons where needed.

1. We will meet at 800 A.M. tomorrow morning.

2. I will be on the plane at 1153 P.M.

3. Which would be better for you, 1000 A.M. or 200 P.M?

4. Be in my office promptly at 1035 A.M.

5. You never get to bed before 1130 P.M.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. We will meet at 8:00 A.M. tomorrow morning.

2. I will be on the plane at 11:53 P.M.

3. Which would be better for you, 10:00 A.M. or 2:00 P.M?

4. Be in my office promptly at 10:35 A.M.

5. You never get to bed before 11:30 P.M.



For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html.

Monday, February 10, 2020

Lesson 386 - Mechanics - Punctuation - Colons

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Use a colon after the salutation of a business letter. Example: Dear Sir:

Instructions: Place colons where needed.

1. Dear Mr. Witt

2. Dear Madam

3. My dear Mrs. Garrity

4. Gentlemen

5. To whom it may concern


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. Dear Mr. Witt:

2. Dear Madam:

3. My dear Mrs. Garrity:

4. Gentlemen:

5. To whom it may concern:



For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html.

Saturday, February 8, 2020

Quiz for Lessons 381 - 385 - Mechanics - Punctuation - Semicolons

View quiz on Daily Grammar

Instructions: Place semicolons where they are needed in the following sentences.

1. I am looking for the poem "The Path Not Taken" I need it tomorrow.

2. Jim sings bass Jeff, tenor.

3. I have visited Riverside, California, Atlantic City, New Jersey, and Butte, Montana.

4. I will steal, cheat, and lie for you but I will not kill for you.

5. There was a sudden noise everything stopped immediately.

6. Although we may need more time, I believe we will be victorious and I believe you feel that way, too.

7. We can trust him implicitly nevertheless, we should not be careless.

8. The house looked like what we wanted on the other hand, we had not been inside.

9. I had food, clothing, and furniture but I didn't have my family.

10. He was such a "klutz" I couldn't stand him.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. I am looking for the poem "The Path Not Taken"; I need it tomorrow.

2. Jim sings bass; Jeff, tenor.

3. I have visited Riverside, California; Atlantic City, New Jersey; and Butte, Montana.

4. I will steal, cheat, and lie for you; but I will not kill for you.

5. There was a sudden noise; everything stopped immediately.

6. Although we may need more time, I believe we will be victorious; and I believe you feel that way, too.

7. We can trust him implicitly; nevertheless, we should not be careless.

8. The house looked like what we wanted; on the other hand, we had not been inside.

9. I had food, clothing, and furniture; but I didn't have my family.

10. He was such a "klutz"; I couldn't stand him.



For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html.

Friday, February 7, 2020

Lesson 385 - Mechanics - Punctuation - Semicolons

View lesson on Daily Grammar

Place a semicolon outside of quotation marks. Example: I have just read "Jabberwocky"; are you familiar with it?

Instructions: Place semicolons where they are needed in the following sentences.

1. Joe is considered "simpatico" Frank is "feio."

2. Terry was wearing "glad rags" Martha, her "threads" Mary, her "duds."

3. I read the poem "Mending Wall" Don read a novel.

4. The car went "bork, bork" the train sounded like "shoosh, shoosh" the plane went "ka-boom."

5. Although it was too late, Jim shouted, "Look out!" and I said, "Duck!"


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. Joe is considered "simpatico"; Frank is "feio."

2. Terry was wearing "glad rags"; Martha, her "threads"; Mary, her "duds."

3. I read the poem "Mending Wall"; Don read a novel.

4. The car went "bork, bork"; the train sounded like "shoosh, shoosh"; the plane went "ka-boom."

5. Although it was too late, Jim shouted "Look out!"; and I said "Duck!"



For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html.

Thursday, February 6, 2020

Lesson 384 - Mechanics - Punctuation - Semicolons

View lesson on Daily Grammar

Use a semicolon to separate phrases or clauses of equal rank which contain commas. The semicolon in such sentences brings clarity of meaning. Example: We have lived in Logan, Utah; Las Vegas, Nevada; and Rio Claro, Brazil.

Instructions: Place semicolons where they are needed in the following sentences.

1. The new in-laws are Jay, Pam's husband, Are', Will's wife, and Mark, Terri's husband.

2. For the campout we took our raincoats, boots, and tarp, but we didn't use them.

3. The mayor of the city, who attended the conference, gave a report, and he suggested several ways to save money.

4. My son is a medical technician, my daughter, a postal worker, and my wife, an editor.

5. The class officers are Fred Ogden, president, Dan Royal, vice-president, and Jayne Allen, secretary.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. The new in-laws are Jay, Pam's husband; Are', Will's wife; and Mark, Terri's husband.

2. For the campout we took our raincoats, boots, and tarp; but we didn't use them.

3. The mayor of the city, who attended the conference, gave a report; and he suggested several ways to save money.

4. My son is a medical technician; my daughter, a postal worker; and my wife, an editor.

5. The class officers are Fred Ogden, president; Dan Royal, vice-president; and Jayne Allen, secretary.



For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html.

Wednesday, February 5, 2020

Lesson 383 - Mechanics - Punctuation - Semicolons

View lesson on Daily Grammar

Use a semicolon before a conjunctive adverb that introduces a clause in a compound sentence.

Common conjunctive adverbs are therefore, nevertheless, moreover, consequently, furthermore, besides, then, thus, instead, accordingly, otherwise, so, yet, still, hence, however. Example: Jill knew she could not win; nevertheless, she kept running.

Explanatory expressions (for example, namely, on the contrary, in fact, that is, on the other hand) are used similarly as conjunctive adverbs with a semicolon preceding them and a comma following. Example: The weather was wonderful; in fact, it was the best weather for a month.

Instructions: Place semicolons where they are needed in the following sentences.

1. I have not heard the latest comments therefore, I cannot render an opinion.

2. Our children have traveled throughout the world for example, Australia, Brazil, Korea, and Russia.

3. In Brazil we have seen many places on the other hand, we have never been to Africa.

4. We plan to return some day to Brazil therefore, we want to visit Rio, Sao Paulo, and Manaus.

5. Barbara is a diligent student she, in fact, is tops in her class.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. I have not heard the latest comments; therefore, I cannot render an opinion.

2. Our children have traveled throughout the world; for example, Australia, Brazil, Korea, and Russia.

3. In Brazil we have seen many places; on the other hand, we have never been to Africa.

4. We plan to return some day to Brazil; therefore, we want to visit Rio, Sao Paulo, and Manaus.

5. Barbara is a diligent student; she, in fact, is tops in her class.



For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html.

Tuesday, February 4, 2020

Lesson 382 - Mechanics - Punctuation - Semicolons

View lesson on Daily Grammar

Use a semicolon between the two independent clauses of a compound sentence joined by a coordinate conjunction if commas are also used in the sentence. Example: Although the story is impossible, I believe you; and the others will, too.

Instructions: Place semicolons where they are needed in the following sentences.

1. Since you asked my opinion, I will tell you and I hope you will listen well.

2. Although he is highly qualified, he is not dependable and I am afraid to hire him.

3. Because Sarah is absent a great deal, she has a hard time keeping up but she is willing to work overtime.

4. Although I prefer English, I know that math is important and I will work hard in both classes.

5. When you arrive on the train, take a taxi to the bus station or I can meet you at the train.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. Since you asked my opinion, I will tell you; and I hope you will listen well.

2. Although he is highly qualified, he is not dependable; and I am afraid to hire him.

3. Because Sarah is absent a great deal, she has a hard time keeping up; but she is willing to work overtime.

4. Although I prefer English, I know that math is important; and I will work hard in both classes.

5. When you arrive on the train, take a taxi to the bus station; or I can meet you at the train.



For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html.

Monday, February 3, 2020

Lesson 381 - Mechanics - Punctuation - Semicolons

View lesson on Daily Grammar

Use a semicolon between two independent clauses of a compound sentence when they are not joined by a coordinate conjunction. Example: There was a sudden silence; everyone was stunned by the outcome.

Instructions: Place semicolons where they are needed in the following sentences.

1. Carl is tall his brother is short.

2. He knocked several times no one came to the door.

3. The siren blew loudly I rushed to the window the police raced pass as I looked out.

4. I waited several hours for you you did not return I became concerned.

5. My sister loves mysteries my brother likes technical manuals.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. Carl is tall; his brother is short.

2. He knocked several times; no one came to the door.

3. The siren blew loudly; I rushed to the window; the police raced past as I looked out.

4. I waited several hours for you; you did not return; I became concerned.

5. My sister loves mysteries; my brother likes technical manuals.



For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html.