Monday, November 30, 2020

Lesson 76 - Parts of Speech - Conjunctions

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A conjunction is a word that joins other words, phrases (groups of words), or clauses (groups of words with a subject and verb). 
 
Co-ordinate conjunctions join words, phrases, or clauses of equal rank. There are two kinds: simple and correlative. Subordinate conjunctions join dependent clauses to independent clauses. I will refer to them simply as co-ordinate, correlative, and subordinate.

The co-ordinate conjunctions are the following: and, but, or, nor, for, and yet. (For and yet can only join clauses.)

The correlative conjunctions are always in pairs. They are either-or, neither-nor, both-and, not only-but also, and whether-or.

Some common subordinate conjunctions are after, although, as, as if, because, before, if, since, so that, than, unless, until, when, where, while.

The co-ordinate and correlative conjunctions should be memorized since they are common and few in number.

Instructions: Find the co-ordinate conjunctions which are joining words in the following sentences and the words that are joined.

1. Jeff and I mowed all the lawns.

2. Grandpa is a slow but strong person.

3. Our guest will be Jeanne or Barbara.

4. I did not like nor appreciate your actions.

5. You or I must do the dishes.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. Jeff and I mowed all the lawns.

2. Grandpa is a slow but strong person.

3. Our guest will be Jeanne or Barbara.

4. I did not like nor appreciate your actions.

5. You or I must do the dishes.


For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html.

Saturday, November 28, 2020

Quiz for Lessons 71-75 - Parts of Speech - Prepositions

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Instructions: Find the prepositional phrases in these sentences. Remember the object must be a noun or a pronoun.

1. Joe came out in a real hurry.

2. The wind arrived before the storm.

3. The tiger leaped over the wall and into the bushes.

4. The boy with the skateboard hurried down the street and into the building.

5. I took a trip to Canada and Mexico.

6. My wife traveled to the glaciers of the Grand Tetons.

7. By the light of the silvery moon, the man on his knees begged for forgiveness.

8. Under the shade of the apple tree, I read my book in peace.

9. She had lost the name of the book about airplanes.

10. The sentences in this lesson are difficult for me to write.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. Joe came out in a real hurry.

2. The wind arrived before the storm.

3. The tiger leaped over the wall and into the bushes.

4. The boy with the skateboard hurried down the street and into the building.

5. I took a trip to Canada and Mexico.

6. My wife traveled to the glaciers of the Grand Tetons.

7. By the light of the silvery moon, the man on his knees begged for forgiveness.

8. Under the shade of the apple tree, I read my book in peace.

9. She had lost the name of the book about airplanes.

10. The sentences in this lesson are difficult for me to write.


For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html.

Friday, November 27, 2020

Lesson 75 - Parts of Speech - Prepositions

View lesson on Daily Grammar

Here is a list of common words that can be used as prepositions: about, above, across, after, against, along, among, around, at, before, behind, below, beneath, beside, besides, between, beyond, but (when it means except), by, concerning, down, during, except, for, from, in, inside, into, like, near, of, off, on, out, outside, over, past, since, through, to, toward, under, until, up, upon, with, within, and without.
 
Instructions: Tell which of the italicized words are prepositions. Remember that prepositions must have an object.

1. Come in and sit down with me.

2. He climbed up on the ladder and through the window.

3. Mrs. Jones came by at suppertime but not since.

4. The firefighter crawled along with the child who was near death.

5. Since no noise came from the building, he walked away.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. with

2. on, through

3. at

4. with, near

5. from


For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html.

Thursday, November 26, 2020

Lesson 74 - Parts of Speech - Prepositions

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Instructions: Remembering what was taught in Lesson 71, combine the sentences into one sentence using prepositional phrases
 
    Example: 
    The band marched. They marched across the football field. 
    Answer: The band marched across the football field.

1. The runner jogged. He jogged around the park.

2. I found my money. It was under the mattress.

3. She looked around. She was in the store.

4. The students performed well. The performance was for the school play.

5. The man walked home. He was walking from work.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. The runner jogged around the park.
      - or -
    Around the park the runner jogged.

2. I found my money under the mattress.
      - or -
    Under the mattress I found my money.

3. She looked around in the store
      - or -
    In the store she looked around.

4. The students performed well for the school play.
      - or -
    For the school play the students performed well.

5. The man walked home from work.
      - or -
    The man walked from work home.
      - or -
    From work the man walked home.


For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html.

Wednesday, November 25, 2020

Lesson 73 - Parts of Speech - Prepositions

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Instructions: Remembering what was taught in Lesson 71, combine the two sentences into one sentence using a prepositional phrase
 
     Example: 
     The ice melted. The ice was in the glass. 
     Answer: The ice in the glass melted.

1. My dog is named Badger. He is in the garden area.

2. The sunset was beautiful. The sunset was in the west.

3. The grass is dead. The grass is near the road.

4. That girl is my best friend. She lives across the street.

5. I talked to that man. He is in my club.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. My dog in the garden area is named Badger

2. The sunset in the west was beautiful.

3. The grass near the road is dead.

4. That girl across the street is my best friend.

5. I talked to that man in my club.


For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html.

Tuesday, November 24, 2020

Lesson 72 - Parts of Speech - Prepositions

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Instructions: Remembering what was taught in Lesson 71, find the prepositions in these sentences. Remember that a preposition must have an object to complete it.

1. I like the color of the curtain on the window.

2. Jane walked along in the rain during the shower.

3. Hang the picture up or set it down behind the couch.

4. Eric was shining his light around in the car beside us.

5. The bird swooped down, picked up the mouse, and landed on the fence.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. I like the color of the curtain on the window.

2. Jane walked along in the rain during the shower.

3. Hang the picture up or set it down behind the couch.

4. Eric was shining his light around in the car beside us.

5. The bird swooped down, picked up the mouse, and landed on the fence.
(up appears to have an object, but really it is telling how or where the bird picked the mouse. You are really saying "The bird picked the mouse up.")


For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html.

Monday, November 23, 2020

Lesson 71 - Parts of Speech - Prepositions

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A preposition is a word that begins a prepositional phrase and shows the relationship between its object and another word in the sentence. A preposition must always have an object. A prepositional phrase starts with a preposition, ends with an object, and may have modifiers between the proposition and object of the preposition.

Here is a list of common words that can be used as prepositions: about, above, across, after, against, along, among, around, at, before, behind, below, beneath, beside, besides, between, beyond, but (when it means except), by, concerning, down, during, except, for, from, in, inside, into, like, near, of, off, on, out, outside, over, past, since, through, to, toward, under, until, up, upon, with, within, and without.

These words can be used as other parts of speech. What part of speech it is depends on how it is used in that sentence. Many of the common words used as prepositions can be used as adverbs. Words are prepositions if they have an object to complete them. 
 
To decide which it is say the preposition followed by whom or what. If a noun or a pronoun answers the question, the word is a preposition.

Example: The boy stood up and ran down the street. Up what? There is no object; therefore up is not a preposition. Down what? Street answers the question; therefore, down is a preposition. Down the street is the prepositional phrase starting with the preposition down and ending with the object street with a modifier the in between.

Instructions: Find the prepositional phrases in the following sentences.

1. Jim painted a picture on the wall of the house.

2. I like to lie in the shade of the apricot tree and think of the jobs for the day.

3. The dog jumped over the mound behind the barn and ran into the street.

4. Everyone but you will need a note from home with parental permission.

5. Around the yard for miles, you could see nothing except junk.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. Jim painted a picture on the wall of the house.

2. I like to lie in the shade of the apricot tree and think of the jobs for the day.

3. The dog jumped over the mound behind the barn and ran into the street.

4. Everyone but you will need a note from home with parental permission.

5. Around the yard for miles, you could see nothing except junk.


For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html.

Saturday, November 21, 2020

Quiz for Lessons 66-70 - Parts of Speech - Adverbs

View lesson on Daily Grammar

Instructions: Choose the correct form for the following sentences.

1. Matthew plays tennis (bad, badly).

2. Can't you see the game (good, well)?

3. The apple tastes (bad, badly).

4. Are you (sure, surely) he will come?

5. The man felt (bad, badly) about the accident.

6. The weather has been (real, really) cold lately.

7. His death caused everyone to be (real, very) sad.

8. Do you feel (good, well)?

9. The pizza tastes (real, really) (good, well).

10. You (sure, surely) are wrong.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. badly

2. well

3. bad

4. sure

5. bad

6. really

7. very

8. well

9. really, good

10. surely


For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html.

Friday, November 20, 2020

Lesson 70 - Parts of Speech - Adverbs

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Instructions: Choose the correct form for each of these sentences. Remember that adjectives modify nouns and pronouns while adverbs modify verbs, adjectives, or other adverbs.

1. Mr. Peterson always speaks (good, well).

2. That coach (sure, surely) gets results.

3. Those knives are (awful, very) sharp.

4. The bacon tasted (good, well).

5. The new teacher (sure, really) is smart.

6. Your assignment was done (bad, badly).

7. I am (real, really) sorry to hear that.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. well

2. surely

3. very

4. good

5. really

6. badly

7. really


For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html.

Thursday, November 19, 2020

Lesson 69 - Parts of Speech - Adverbs

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The adjectives real and awful should not be used for the adverbs really, very, and extremely.

Instructions: Choose the correct form for each of these sentences.

1. She is (very, real) sorry.

2. Today is (really, real) stormy.

3. Is that a (really, real) person?

4. Be sure to drive (very, real) carefully on slick roads.

5. I am (extremely, real) tired of your antics.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. very

2. really

3. real

4. very

5. extremely


For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html.

Wednesday, November 18, 2020

Lesson 68 - Parts of Speech - Adverbs

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The adverb badly is used to tell how something is done. The adjective bad is used to refer to health or feelings and to complete linking verbs such as seem, look, taste, smell.

Instructions: Choose the correct form for each of the following sentences.

1. Our football team played (bad, badly) last night.

2. John felt (bad, badly) about the loss.

3. The medicine doesn't taste too (bad, badly).

4. Our science project went (bad, badly).

5. The air in the sewer smelled (bad, badly).


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. badly

2. bad

3. bad

4. badly

5. bad
 
Note: The adjective bad in this lesson is a predicate adjective (an adjective which comes after a linking verb and modifies the subject).


For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html.

Tuesday, November 17, 2020

Lesson 67 - Parts of Speech - Adverbs

View lesson on Daily Grammar

The adjective good should not be used for the adverb well. Well should be used for an adjective only when it refers to health or appearance.

Instructions: Choose the correct form for each of these sentences.

1. This food tastes very (good, well).

2. Ann doesn't drive very (good, well).

3. Dad writes (good, well).

4. Becky worked (good, well) today.

5. That hot sun feels (good, well).


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. good

2. well

3. well

4. well

5. good


For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html.

Monday, November 16, 2020

Lesson 66 - Parts of Speech - Adverbs

View lesson on Daily Grammar

People often confuse the use of some adverbs and adjectives. The next few lessons will cover some common mistakes. Remember that adjectives modify nouns or pronouns. Adverbs modify verbs, adjectives, or other adverbs.

This lesson will be about the use of the adjective sure and the adverbs surely, certainly, and really. Use sure only when one of these three adverbs does not make sense.

      Examples: 
      Jim is sure he is right. 
      Surely he is right.

Instructions: Choose the correct form for each of these sentences.

1. You seem very (surely, sure) of yourself.

2. Ila (surely, sure) is tired from work.

3. The milk (surely, sure) tastes sour.

4. Are you (surely, sure) this is the right road?

5. This story (surely, sure) is exciting.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. sure

2. surely

3. surely

4. sure

5. surely

Note: Each answer in which you used surely could be substituted with the other adverbs really and certainly and still make sense.


For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html.

Saturday, November 14, 2020

Quiz for Lessons 61-65 - Parts of Speech - Adverbs

View lesson on Daily Grammar

Instructions: Find the adverbs and tell what they modify in the following sentences.

1. After the hike my muscles were extremely tired and very sore.

2. Yesterday I had hardly completed my very hard assignment when I was rudely interrupted.

3. Gradually everyone reached the top of the mountain they had climbed before.

4. Just now he remembered his rather important assignment.

5. Often you go too far with your jokes.


--For answers scroll down.












Answers:

1. After the hike my muscles were extremely tired and very sore.
    - extremely modifies tired 
    - very modifies sore

2. Yesterday I had hardly completed my very hard assignment when I was rudely interrupted.
    - yesterday and hardly modify had completed
    - very modifies hard 
    - rudely modifies was interrupted

3. Gradually everyone reached the top of the mountain they had climbed before.
    - gradually modifies reached
    - before modifies had climbed

4. Just now he remembered his rather important assignment.
    - just modifies now
    - now modifies remembered
    - rather modifies important

5. Often you go too far with your jokes.
    - often modifies go
    - too modifies far
    - far modifies go


For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html.