Tuesday, December 18, 2018

Lesson 87 - Parts of Speech - Review

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The eight parts of speech are verbs, nouns, pronouns, adjectives, adverbs, prepositions, conjunctions, and interjections.

Verbs show action or state of being.

Nouns are the names of persons, places or things.

Pronouns take the place of nouns.

Adjectives modify nouns or pronouns and tell which, whose, what kind, and how many.

Adverbs modify verbs, adjectives, and other adverbs and tell how, when, where, and how much.

Prepositions must have an object and show a relationship between its object and some other word in the sentence.

Conjunctions join words, phrases, and clauses.

Interjections show feeling and are punctuated with either a comma or an exclamation point.

If you need further clarification on any of the parts of speech, see the Daily Grammar archives (http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html). Remember that what part of speech a word is depends on how it is used in the sentence.

Instructions: Identify what part of speech each word is in the following sentences.

1. Neither Ila nor I knew that the baby had arrived already.

2. Yes, you can go with us to Canada tomorrow.

3. We will be driving together, but Mom won't return at the same time as we do.


--For answers scroll down.












Answers:


1. Neither - conjunction, Ila - noun, nor - conjunction, I - pronoun, knew - verb, that - conjunction, the - adjective, baby - noun, had - verb, arrived - verb, already - adverb.

2. Yes - interjection, you - pronoun, can - verb, go - verb, with - preposition, us - pronoun, to - preposition, Canada - noun, tomorrow - adverb.

3. We - pronoun, will - verb, be - verb, driving - verb, together - adverb, but - conjunction, Mom - noun, will - verb, not (n't) - adverb, return - verb, at - preposition, the - adjective, same - adjective, time - noun, as - conjunction, we - pronoun, do - verb.


For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html.

Monday, December 17, 2018

Lesson 86 - Parts of Speech - Review

View lesson on Daily Grammar

We are going to review the eight parts of speech in the next five lessons. The eight parts of speech are verbs, nouns, pronouns, adjectives, adverbs, prepositions, conjunctions, and interjections.

Verbs show action or state of being.

Nouns are the names of persons, places or things.

Pronouns take the place of nouns.

Adjectives modify nouns or pronouns and tell which, whose, what kind, and how many.

Adverbs modify verbs, adjectives, and other adverbs and tell how, when, where, and how much.

Prepositions must have an object and show a relationship between its object and some other word in the sentence.

Conjunctions join words, phrases, and clauses.

Interjections show feeling and are punctuated with either a comma or an exclamation point.

If you need further clarification on any of the parts of speech, see the Daily Grammar archives (http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html). Remember that what part of speech a word is depends on how it is used in the sentence.

Instructions:  Identify what part of speech each word is in the following sentences.

1. Wow! That must be a very hot fire.

2. He seemed sorry since he almost immediately apologized to us.

3. Mom wanted the answer, but we had had no reply from our daughter or son.


--For answers scroll down.












Answers:

1. Wow - interjections, that - pronoun, must - verb, be - verb, a - adjective, very - adverb, hot - adjective, fire - noun.

2. He - pronoun, seemed - verb, sorry - adjective, since - conjunction, he - pronoun, almost - adverb, immediately - adverb, apologized - verb, to - preposition, us - pronoun.

3. Mom - noun, wanted - verb, the - adjective, answer - noun, but - conjunction, we - pronoun, had - verb, had - verb, no - adjective, reply - noun, from - preposition, our - adjective, daughter - noun, or - conjunction, son - noun.


For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html.

Saturday, December 15, 2018

Quiz for Lessons 81-85 - Parts of Speech - Conjunctions

View lesson on Daily Grammar

A conjunction is a word that joins other words, phrases, or clauses. Co-ordinate conjunctions join words, phases, or clauses of equal rank. There are two kinds: simple and correlative. Subordinate conjunctions join dependent clauses to independent clauses. I will refer to them simply as co-ordinate, correlative, and subordinate.

The co-ordinate conjunctions are the following: and, but, or, nor, for, and yet. (For and yet can only join clauses.)

The correlative conjunctions are always in pairs. They are either-or, neither-nor, both-and, not only-but also, and whether-or.

Some common subordinate conjunctions are after, although, as, as if, because, before, if, since, so that, than, unless, until, when, where, and while.

Instructions: Find the conjunctions in these sentences, and tell whether it is co-ordinate, correlative, or subordinate.

1. If you have time, visit your sister while you are in Tucson.

2. The hurricane damaged not only North Carolina but also New Jersey.

3. The injured boy could neither walk nor talk.

4. Soccer and basketball are popular sports throughout the world.

5. The principal and the teacher were shocked, but they soon punished him.

6. She was arrested because she was both dishonest and corrupt.

7. As I said, you may have either this dog or the other.

8. Did you honk, or did I imagine it?

9. Although the storm passed, the clouds were dark and gloomy.

10. After the semester was over, my friend and I traveled to the Black Hills and Mount Rushmore.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. If (subordinate), while (subordinate)

2. not only-but also (correlative)

3. neither-nor (correlative)

4. and (co-ordinate)

5. and (co-ordinate), but (co-ordinate)

6. because (subordinate), both-and (correlative)

7. as (subordinate), either-or (correlative)

8. or (co-ordinate)

9. although (subordinate), and (co-ordinate)

10. after (subordinate), and (co-ordinate), and (co-ordinate)


For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html.

Friday, December 14, 2018

Lesson 85 - Parts of Speech - Interjections

View lesson on Daily Grammar

An interjection is a word or word group that shows feeling. A mild interjection is followed by a comma; a strong interjection is followed by an exclamation mark. Interjections are rather easy to understand so we will not spend much time on them.

Examples:

Well, we will soon be home.

Oh! I didn't know he had died.

Instructions: Find the interjections in these sentences.

1. Dear me! That is terrible.

2. Nonsense, you can do it.

3. Wow! You look gorgeous!

4. Sh! The baby is asleep.

5. Oh, what a beautiful baby you have.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. dear me

2. nonsense

3. wow

4. sh

5. oh


For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html.

Thursday, December 13, 2018

Lesson 84 - Parts of Speech - Conjunctions

View lesson on Daily Grammar

A conjunction is a word that joins other words, phrases, or clauses. Subordinate conjunctions join dependent clauses (a sentence that must be attached to another clause to make sense) to independent clauses (a sentence that makes sense by itself).

Some common subordinate conjunctions are after, although, as, as if, because, before, if, since, so that, than, unless, until, when, where, while.

Instructions: Find the subordinate conjunctions in these sentences.

1. If you don't mind, I will return in a week.

2. I am working hard because I want to succeed.

3. I will not be going north until the weather changes.

4. Unless you are correct about the trail, we will be lost in these mountains.

5. He can do this work better than I can.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. if

2. because

3. until

4. unless

5. than


For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html.

Wednesday, December 12, 2018

Lesson 83 - Parts of Speech - Conjunctions

View lesson on Daily Grammar

A conjunction is a word that joins other words, phrases, or clauses. Correlative conjunctions join words, phases, or clauses of equal rank.

The correlative conjunctions are always in pairs. They are either-or, neither-nor, both-and, not only-but also, and whether-or.

Instructions: Find the correlative conjunctions in these sentences and tell if they are joining words, phrases, or clauses.

1. I like neither the blue one nor the red one.

2. Both the man and his wife wanted not only the television but also the VCR.

3. Whether you like it, or you don't like it, I am going home.

4. Either you get the work done now, or I will get someone else to do it.

5. Both the letter to the editor and the response to it were gratifying.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. neither-nor (words) one and one - The adjectives "the blue" and "the red" don't change what is joined.

2. both-and (words), man and wife; not only-but also (words) television and VCR - Again the adjectives don't change the fact that you are joining words (nouns).

3. whether-or (clauses)

4. either-or (clauses)

5. both-and (words) letter and response - Leaving out the modifiers doesn't change the meaning of the sentence.


For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html.

Tuesday, December 11, 2018

Lesson 82 - Parts of Speech - Conjunctions

View lesson on Daily Grammar

Instructions: Locate the correlative conjunctions joining clauses in these sentences.

1. Either I heard someone knocking, or I thought that I did.

2. Whether you like it, or they like it, doesn't matter.

3. Both what I say, and what I do are important.

4. Not only will I do my best, but also I will do it correctly.

5. Neither had the man gone, nor was he going soon.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. either-or

2. whether-or

3. both-and

4. not only-but also

5. neither-nor


For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html.

Monday, December 10, 2018

Lesson 81 - Parts of Speech - Conjunctions

View lesson on Daily Grammar

A conjunction is a word that joins other words, phrases, or clauses. Correlative conjunctions join words, phases, or clauses of equal rank.

The correlative conjunctions are always in pairs. They are either-or, neither-nor, both-and, not only-but also, and whether-or.

Instructions: List the correlative conjunctions joining phrases in the following sentences.

1. You can go neither to the corn maze nor to the movie.

2. Not only in the movie but also in the book, the plot was outstanding.

3. I will wear either the gray coat or the brown sweater with this pair of pants.

4. I didn't know whether to correct him or let him learn the hard way.

5. I enjoyed both reading the book and seeing the movie.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. neither-nor

2. not only-but also

3. either-or

4. whether-or

5. both-and


For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html.

Saturday, December 8, 2018

Quiz for Lessons 76-80 - Parts of Speech - Conjunctions

View quiz on Daily Grammar

A conjunction is a word that joins other words, phrases, or clauses. Co-ordinate conjunctions join words, phrases, or clauses of equal rank.

The co-ordinate conjunctions are the following: and, but, or, nor, for, and yet. (For and yet can only join clauses.)

The correlative conjunctions are always in pairs. They are either-or, neither-nor, both-and, not only-but also, and whether-or.

Instructions: Find the co-ordinate and correlative conjunctions in these sentences.

1. The boys and the girls not only like but also adore both the puppies and the kittens.

2. My mother or my father will come to see you either today or tomorrow.

3. Neither the plane nor the train would arrive on time.

4. Both the man and his friend came down the hall and went into the room.

5. The cook didn't know whether to bake or to mash the potatoes for supper.

6. I didn't win the race, but I didn't care.

7. The trip will take us through the hills and across the valleys.

8. Canada is both beautiful and cold, but I like to visit there.

9. Jeff and Jim are brothers, yet they are not alike.

10. Carl likes to eat and sleep but not work.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. and, not only-but also, both-and

2. or, either-or

3. neither-nor

4. both-and, and

5. whether-or

6. but

7. and

8. both-and, but

9. and, yet

10. and, but


For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html.

Friday, December 7, 2018

Lesson 80 - Parts of Speech - Conjunctions

View lesson on Daily Grammar

A conjunction is a word that joins other words, phrases (groups of words), or clauses (groups of words with a subject and verb). Correlative conjunctions join words, phrases, or clauses of equal rank.

The correlative conjunctions are always in pairs. They are either-or, neither-nor, both-and, not only-but also, and whether-or.

Instructions: Find the correlative conjunctions joining words in the following sentences.

1. Either you or I will have to move.

2. I like neither writing nor reading.

3. Your work is both neat and accurate.

4. The meal is not only delicious but also nutritious.

5. The little boy didn't know whether to cry or not.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. either-or

2. neither-nor

3. both-and

4. not only-but also

5. whether-or


For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html.

Thursday, December 6, 2018

Lesson 79 - Parts of Speech - Conjunctions

View lesson on Daily Grammar

A conjunction is a word that joins other words, phrases (groups of words), or clauses (groups of words with a subject and verb). Co-ordinate conjunctions join words, phrases, or clauses of equal rank.

The co-ordinate conjunctions are the following: and, but, or, nor, for, and yet. (For and yet can only join clauses.)

Instructions: Find the co-ordinate conjunctions in these sentences and tell if they are joining words, phrases, or clauses.

1. Will and I went to the game, but Jeff and Jim went swimming.

2. I will go, but I will stay in the hotel or in the waiting room.

3. The men work through the day and into the night.

4. The message will be sent tomorrow or the next day and will arrive in time for the event.

5. He would not help, nor would he allow me to help.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. and (words), but (clauses), and (words)

2. but (clauses), or (phrases)

3. and (phrases)

4. or (words), and (phrases)

5. nor (clauses)


For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html.

Wednesday, December 5, 2018

Lesson 78 - Parts of Speech - Conjunctions

View lesson on Daily Grammar

A conjunction is a word that joins other words, phrases (groups of words), or clauses (groups of words with a subject and verb). Co-ordinate conjunctions join words, phrases, or clauses of equal rank.

The co-ordinate conjunctions are the following: and, but, or, nor, for, and yet. (For and yet can only join clauses.)

Instructions: Find the co-ordinate conjunctions which are joining clauses in these sentences.

1. I do not like the idea, yet I will help.

2. The trip was a delight for us, for we had a great time.

3. The mail has not arrived, nor will it come today.

4. I will speak the truth, or I will not work for you.

5. Mom likes Christmas, but Dad likes Halloween.

6. Ann washes the walls, and Pam vacuums the carpet.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. yet

2. for

3. nor

4. or

5. but

6. and


For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html.

Tuesday, December 4, 2018

Lesson 77 - Parts of Speech - Conjunctions

View lesson on Daily Grammar

A conjunction is a word that joins other words, phrases (groups of words), or clauses (groups of words with a subject and verb). Co-ordinate conjunctions join words, phrases, or clauses of equal rank.

The co-ordinate conjunctions are the following: and, but, or, nor, for, and yet. (For and yet can only join clauses.)

Instructions: Find the co-ordinate conjunctions which are joining phrases in these sentences and the phrases that are joined.

1. The girls ran up the path and over the hill.

2. I became ill by eating the food and stuffing myself.

3. Meet me by the fountain or near the train station.

4. He should have arrived or will be arriving soon.

5. Joe had promised to come but did not keep his promise.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. and - joining up the path/over the hill

2. and - joining eating the food/stuffing myself

3. or - joining by the fountain/near the train station

4. or - joining should have arrived/will be arriving

5. but - joining had promised/did keep


For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html.

Monday, December 3, 2018

Lesson 76 - Parts of Speech - Conjunctions

View lesson on Daily Grammar

A conjunction is a word that joins other words, phrases (groups of words), or clauses (groups of words with a subject and verb). Co-ordinate conjunctions join words, phrases, or clauses of equal rank. There are two kinds: simple and correlative. Subordinate conjunctions join dependent clauses to independent clauses. I will refer to them simply as co-ordinate, correlative, and subordinate.

The co-ordinate conjunctions are the following: and, but, or, nor, for, and yet. (For and yet can only join clauses.)

The correlative conjunctions are always in pairs. They are either-or, neither-nor, both-and, not only-but also, and whether-or.

Some common subordinate conjunctions are after, although, as, as if, because, before, if, since, so that, than, unless, until, when, where, while.

The co-ordinate and correlative conjunctions should be memorized since they are common and few in number.

Instructions: Find the co-ordinate conjunctions which are joining words in the following sentences and the words that are joined.

1. Jeff and I mowed all the lawns.

2. Grandpa is a slow but strong person.

3. Our guest will be Jeanne or Barbara.

4. I did not like nor appreciate your actions.

5. You or I must do the dishes.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. and - joining Jeff/I

2. but - joining slow/strong

3. or - joining Jeanne/Barbara

4. nor - joining like/appreciate

5. or - joining You/I


For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html.