Thursday, February 25, 2021

Lesson 139 - Parts of the Sentence - Pronouns

View lesson on Daily Grammar

Pronouns take the place of nouns. Personal pronouns have what is called case. Case means that a different form of a pronoun is used for different parts of the sentence. There are three cases: nominative, objective, and possessive. Many mistakes are made in the use of nominative and objective case pronouns. Memorizing each list will help you use them correctly.

Nominative case pronouns are I, she, he, we, they, and who. They are used as subjects, predicate nominatives, and appositives when used with a subject or predicate nominative.

Objective case pronouns are me, her, him, us, them, and whom. They are used as direct objects, indirect objects, objects of the preposition, and appositives when used with one of the objects. (We will learn about indirect objects and objects of the preposition in later lessons.) (You and it are both nominative and objective case.)

Possessive case pronouns are my, mine, your, yours, his, her, hers, its, our, ours, your, yours, their, and theirs. They are used to show ownership.

Instructions: Choose the correct form of the pronoun and tell why you chose it.

1. Yes, it was (him, he).

2. (We, Us) girls went together to shop.

3. (Who, Whom) is on the phone? It is (me, I).

4. Jim met Pam and (me, I) at the movie.

5. The noise outside awakened (us, we).


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. Yes, it was he.
    - predicate nominative, nominative case

2. We girls went together to shop.
    - subject, nominative case

3. Who is on the phone? It is I.
    - subject and predicate nominative, nominative case

4. Jim met Pam and me at the movie.
    - direct object, objective case

5. The noise outside awakened us.
    - direct object, objective case


For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html.

Wednesday, February 24, 2021

Lesson 138 - Parts of the Sentence - Pronouns

View lesson on Daily Grammar
 
Pronouns take the place of nouns. Personal pronouns have what is called case. Case means that a different form of a pronoun is used for different parts of the sentence. There are three cases: nominative, objective, and possessive. Many mistakes are made in the use of nominative and objective case pronouns. Memorizing each list will help you use them correctly.

Nominative case pronouns are I, she, he, we, they, and who. They are used as subjects, predicate nominatives, and appositives when used with a subject or predicate nominative.

Objective case pronouns are me, her, him, us, them, and whom. They are used as direct objects, indirect objects, objects of the preposition, and appositives when used with one of the objects. (We will learn about indirect objects and objects of the preposition in later lessons.) (You and it are both nominative and objective case.)

Possessive case pronouns are my, mine, your, yours, his, her, hers, its, our, ours, your, yours, their, and theirs. They are used to show ownership.

Instructions: Choose the correct form of the pronoun and tell why you chose it.

1. (Who, Whom) did you send?

2. The man saw (them, they) outside.

3. Had the girls met (he, him) before?

4. The boss helped (we, us), Tom and (I, me).

5. I saw (she, her) at the door.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. Whom did you send?
    - direct object, objective case

2. The man saw them outside.
    - direct object, objective case

3. Had the girls met him before?
    - direct object, objective case

4. The boss helped us, Tom and me.
    - direct object and appositive, objective case

5. I saw her at the door.
    - direct object, objective case


For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html.

Tuesday, February 23, 2021

Lesson 137 - Parts of the Sentence - Pronouns

View lesson on Daily Grammar

Pronouns take the place of nouns. Personal pronouns have what is called case. Case means that a different form of a pronoun is used for different parts of the sentence. There are three cases: nominative, objective, and possessive. Many mistakes are made in the use of nominative and objective case pronouns. Memorizing each list will help you use them correctly.

Nominative case pronouns are I, she, he, we, they, and who. They are used as subjects, predicate nominatives, and appositives when used with a subject or predicate nominative.

Objective case pronouns are me, her, him, us, them, and whom. They are used as direct objects, indirect objects, objects of the preposition, and appositives when used with one of the objects. (We will learn about indirect objects and objects of the preposition in later lessons.) (You and it are both nominative and objective case.)

Possessive case pronouns are my, mine, your, yours, his, her, hers, its, our, ours, your, yours, their, and theirs. They are used to show ownership.

Instructions: Choose the correct form of the pronoun and tell why you chose it.

1. It could have been (them, they).

2. Yes, it was (us, we).

3. The runaway girl was (her, she).

4. This is (him, he).

5. The winner was (me, I).


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. It could have been they.
    - predicate nominative, nominative case

2. Yes, it was we.
    - predicate nominative, nominative case

3. The runaway girl was she.
    - predicate nominative, nominative case

4. This is he.
    - predicate nominative, nominative case

5. The winner was I.
    - predicate nominative, nominative case
 
Note: Predicate nominatives give us the most trouble; therefore, these may all sound strange to you, but they are correct.


For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html.

Monday, February 22, 2021

Lesson 136 - Parts of the Sentence - Pronouns

View lesson on Daily Grammar

Pronouns take the place of nouns. Personal pronouns have what is called case. Case means that a different form of a pronoun is used for different parts of the sentence. There are three cases: nominative, objective, and possessive. Many mistakes are made in the use of nominative and objective case pronouns. Memorizing each list will help you use them correctly.

Nominative case pronouns are I, she, he, we, they, and who. They are used as subjects, predicate nominatives, and appositives when used with a subject or predicate nominative.

Objective case pronouns are me, her, him, us, them, and whom. They are used as direct objects, indirect objects, objects of the preposition, and appositives when used with one of the objects. (We will learn about indirect objects and objects of the preposition in later lessons.) (You and it are both nominative and objective case.)

Possessive case pronouns are my, mine, your, yours, his, her, hers, its, our, ours, your, yours, their, and theirs. They are used to show ownership.

Instructions: Choose the correct form of the pronoun and tell why you chose it.

1. (I, Me) went to the movie.

2. (Him, He) is my best friend.

3. (They, Them) will be here soon.

4. (She, Her) ran happily down the street.

5. There (we, us) went.

6. (Who, Whom) is it?


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. I went to the movie.   
    - subject, nominative case

2. He is my best friend.
    - subject, nominative case

3. They will be here soon.
    - subject, nominative case

4. She ran happily down the street.
    - subject, nominative case

5. There we went.
    - subject, nominative case

6. Who is it?
    - subject, nominative case


For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html.

Saturday, February 20, 2021

Quiz for Lessons 131- 135 - Parts of the Sentence - Nouns of Address

View quiz on Daily Grammar

Instructions: Find the verbs, subjects, predicate nominatives, direct objects, appositive, and nouns of address in these sentences and tell whether the verb is transitive active (ta), transitive passive (tp), intransitive linking (il), or intransitive complete (ic).

1. Dr. Jensen, a brain surgeon, performed the complicated operation.

2. These parts of the sentence, an appositive and a noun of address, are sometimes confused, students.

3. My fellow citizens, our local paper, the Blab, covers the news well.

4. That mongrel, a shaggy-looking creature, is my dog Badger.

5. You should consult Dr. A. J. Hoyt, a skin specialist, sir.

6. You, my dear, will have my promise, a statement of honor.

7. For dinner I had my favorite dessert, strawberry pie.

8. Comrades, we are here in Russia once again.

9, Matthew, have you swum in the Pacific Ocean, Balboa's discovery?

10. Have you met my friend, Amy?


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. performed = verb (ta), Dr. Jensen = subject, operation = direct object, surgeon = appositive

2. are confused = verb (tp), parts = subject, appositive/ noun = appositives, students = noun of address

3. covers = verb (ta), paper = subject, news = direct object, Blab = appositive, citizens = noun of address

4. is = verb (il), mongrel = subject, dog = predicate nominative, creature/Badger = appositives

5. should consult = verb (ta), you = subject, Dr. A. J. Hoyt = direct object, specialist = appositive, sir = noun of address

6. will have = verb (ta), you = subject, promise = direct object, statement = appositive, dear = noun of address

7. had = verb (ta), I = subject, dessert = direct object, pie = appositive

8. are = verb (ic), we = subject, Comrades = noun of address

9. have swum = verb (ic), you = subject, discovery = appositive, Matthew = noun of address

10. have met = verb (ta), you = subject, friend = direct object, Amy = noun of address (If it were an appositive, it would have no commas.)


For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html.

Friday, February 19, 2021

Lesson 135 - Parts of the Sentence - Nouns of Address

View lesson on Daily Grammar

Nouns or nominatives of address are the persons or things to which you are speaking. They are set off from the rest of the sentence by a comma or commas, may have modifiers, and are not related to the rest of the sentence grammatically. You can remove them and a complete sentence remains. They may be first, last or in the middle of the sentence. 
 
Examples: 
John, where are you going? 
Where are you going, John
Where, John, are you going?

An appositive is a word or group of words that identifies or renames the noun or pronoun that it follows. It is set off by commas unless closely tied to the word that it identifies or renames. ("Closely tied" means that it is needed to identify the word.) 
 
Examples: 
My son Carl is a medical technician. (no commas) 
Badger, our dog with a missing leg, has a love for cats. (commas needed)

We must be sure to not confuse nouns of address with appositives since they are both set off with commas.

Instructions: Find the verbs, subjects, predicate nominatives, direct objects, appositive, and nouns of address in these sentences and tell whether the verb is transitive active (ta), transitive passive (tp), intransitive linking (il), or intransitive complete (ic).

1. My car, a Plymouth van, rolled over and over on the highway.

2. Class, please read chapter one, "Verbs."

3. Gentlemen, we must help our young people, the leaders of tomorrow.

4. Sarah, this is my brother Ken.

5. We are planning a trip for next summer, young lady.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. rolled = verb (ic), car = subject, van = appositive

2. read = verb (ta), you (understood) = subject, chapter one = direct object, "Verbs" = appositive, class = noun of address

3. must help = verb (ta), we = subject, people = direct object, leaders = appositive, gentlemen = noun of address

4. is = verb (il), this = subject, brother = predicate nominative, Ken = appositive, Sarah = noun of address

5. are planning = verb (ta), we = subject, trip = direct object, lady = noun of address


For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html.

Thursday, February 18, 2021

Lesson 134 - Parts of the Sentence - Nouns of Address

View lesson on Daily Grammar

Nouns or nominatives of address are the persons or things to which you are speaking. They are set off from the rest of the sentence by a comma or commas, may have modifiers, and are not related to the rest of the sentence grammatically. You can remove them and a complete sentence remains. They may be first, last or in the middle of the sentence. 
 
Examples: 
John, where are you going? 
Where are you going, John
Where, John, are you going?

An appositive is a word or group of words that identifies or renames the noun or pronoun that it follows. It is set off by commas unless closely tied to the word that it identifies or renames. ("Closely tied" means that it is needed to identify the word.) 
 
Examples: 
My son Carl is a medical technician. (no commas) 
Badger, our dog with a missing leg, has a love for cats. (commas needed)

We must be sure to not confuse nouns of address with appositives since they are both set off with commas.

Instructions: Find the verbs, subjects, predicate nominatives, direct objects, appositive, and nouns of address in these sentences and tell whether the verb is transitive active (ta), transitive passive (tp), intransitive linking (il), or intransitive complete (ic).

1. Sam, where is that car, the Volvo?

2. Joe, that woman, Miss Clayson, is a famous newscaster.

3. Mr. Smith, our sponsor, is upset with our advertising, Helen.

4. Kids, I want you to meet our new neighbor, Ann Wise.

5. Everyone, we will watch the television program, "Memories."


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. is = verb (ic), car = subject, Volvo = appositive, Sam = noun of address

2. is = verb (il), woman = subject, newscaster = predicate nominative, Miss Clayson = appositive, Joe = noun of address

3. is upset = verb (tp), Mr. Smith = subject, sponsor = appositive, Helen = noun of address

4. want = verb (ta), I = subject, you = direct object, Ann Wise = appositive, Kids = noun of address

5. will watch = verb (ta), we = subject, program = direct object, Everyone = noun of address, "Memories" = appositive


For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html.

Wednesday, February 17, 2021

Lesson 133 - Parts of the Sentence - Nouns of Address

View lesson on Daily Grammar

Nouns or nominatives of address are the persons or things to which you are speaking. They are set off from the rest of the sentence by a comma or commas, may have modifiers, and are not related to the rest of the sentence grammatically. You can remove them and a complete sentence remains. They may be first, last or in the middle of the sentence. 
 
Examples: 
John, where are you going? 
Where are you going, John
Where, John, are you going?

Instructions: Find the verbs, subjects, predicate nominatives, direct objects, and nouns of address in these sentences and tell whether the verb is transitive active (ta), transitive passive (tp), intransitive linking (il), or intransitive complete (ic).

1. General, your men are loyal soldiers and brave fighters.

2. There is no need for alarm, students.

3. Will he give the instructions again, Miss Jones?

4. Men and women, we must meet our goals to be successful.

5. Becky, the guests have already arrived.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. are = verb (il), men = subject, soldiers/fighters = predicate nominatives, general = noun of address

2. is = verb (ic), need = subject, students = noun of address

3. will give = verb (ta), he = subject, instructions = direct object, Miss Jones = noun of address

4. must meet = verb (ta), we = subject, goals = direct object, Men/women = nouns of address

5. have arrived = verb (ic), guests = subject, Becky = noun of address


For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html.

Tuesday, February 16, 2021

Lesson 132 - Parts of the Sentence - Nouns of Address

View lesson on Daily Grammar

Nouns or nominatives of address are the persons or things to which you are speaking. They are set off from the rest of the sentence by a comma or commas, may have modifiers, and are not related to the rest of the sentence grammatically. You can remove them and a complete sentence remains. They may be first, last or in the middle of the sentence. 
 
Examples: 
John, where are you going? 
Where are you going, John
Where, John, are you going?

Instructions: Find the verbs, subjects, predicate nominatives, direct objects, and nouns of address in these sentences and tell whether the verb is transitive active (ta), transitive passive (tp), intransitive linking (il), or intransitive complete (ic).

1. Here, Mary, is a glass of water.

2. My fellowmen, there is no need for worry.

3. What happened to my car, Dad?

4. You, my friends, are so kind!

5. We have no more candy, Jeanne.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. is = verb (ic), glass = subject, Mary = noun of address

2. is = verb (ic), need = subject, fellowmen = noun of address

3. happened = verb (ic), what = subject, Dad = noun of address

4. are = verb (il), you = subject, friends = noun of address

5. have = verb (ta), we = subject, candy = direct object, Jeanne = noun of address


For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html.

Monday, February 15, 2021

Lesson 131 - Parts of the Sentence - Nouns of Address

View lesson on Daily Grammar

Nouns or nominatives of address are the persons or things to which you are speaking. They are set off from the rest of the sentence by a comma or commas, may have modifiers, and are not related to the rest of the sentence grammatically. You can remove them and a complete sentence remains. They may be first, last or in the middle of the sentence. 
 
Examples: 
John, where are you going? 
Where are you going, John
Where, John, are you going?

Because I use diagramming to teach in the classroom and can't on the internet, I will be asking you to find various parts of the sentence for the repetition. The repetition should help you remember the parts of the sentence.

Instructions: Find the verbs, subjects, predicate nominatives, direct objects, and nouns of address in these sentences and tell whether the verb is transitive active (ta), transitive passive (tp), intransitive linking (il), or intransitive complete (ic).

1. Sir, may I speak with you for a moment?

2. Jeff, are you leaving tomorrow?

3. Listen carefully to the instructions, boys and girls.

4. Fred, Anna needs your assistance for the afternoon.

5. Please, Mr. President, accept our apologies.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. may speak = verb (ic), I = subject, sir = noun of address

2. are leaving = verb (ic), you = subject, Jeff = noun of address

3. listen = verb (ic), you (understood) = subject, boys and girls = nouns of address

4. needs = verb (ta), Anna = subject, assistance = direct object, Fred = noun of address

5. accept = verb (ta), you (understood) = subject, apologies = direct object, Mr. President = noun of address


For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html.

Saturday, February 13, 2021

Quiz for Lessons 126 -130 - Parts of the Sentence - Appositives

View lesson on Daily Grammar

Instructions: Identify the appositives in the following sentences and tell whether they are appositives to subjects, direct objects, or predicate nominatives.

1. Rome, the capital of Italy, is a very large city.

2. Have you ever visited Lagoon, our biggest amusement park?

3. The woman with the hat, the viola player, is my sister-in-law.

4. Those women are Elaine and Marilyn, my two sisters.

5. Mr. Gayle, our sponsor, will show you around.


Instructions: Combine the following sentences by using an appositive.

6. Mrs. Karren is greeting the guests. They are possible buyers.

7. Have you met our new foreman? He is the tall man in the coveralls.

8. Watch out for Main Street. It is a very slick road.

9. The Lewises provided the entertainment. They showed home movies.

10. The cargo was very precious. It was gold and silver.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. capital = appositive to the subject, Rome

2. amusement park = appositive to direct object, Lagoon

3. player = appositive to subject, woman

4. sisters = appositive to predicate nominatives. Elaine/Marilyn

5. sponsor = appositive to subject, Mr. Gayle

6. Mrs. Karren is greeting the guests, possible buyers.

7. Have you met our new foreman, the tall man in the coveralls.

8. Watch out for Main Street, a very slick road.

9. The Lewises provided the entertainment, home movies.

10. The cargo, gold and silver, was very precious.


For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html.

Friday, February 12, 2021

Lesson 130 - Parts of the Sentence - Appositives

View lesson on Daily Grammar
 
An appositive is a word or group of words that identifies or renames the noun or pronoun that it follows. It is set off by commas unless closely tied to the word that it identifies or renames. ("Closely tied" means that it is needed to identify the word.) 
 
Appositives should not be confused with predicate nominatives. A verb will separate the subject from the predicate nominative. An appositive can follow any noun or pronoun including the subject, direct object, or predicate nominative.
 
Examples: 
My son Carl is a medical technician. (no commas) 
Badger, our dog with a missing leg, has a love for cats. (commas needed)

Appositives may be compound. 
 
Example: 
The two children, Wendy and Sam, are excellent students.

You can make one smooth sentence from two short, choppy sentences by using an appositive
 
Example: 
Ila won the prize. It was a trip to Hawaii. 
Ila won the prize, a trip to Hawaii.

Instructions: Combine the following sentences by using an appositive.

1. Sonja sits beside me in English class. She is a girl from Poland.

2. On the deck are many plants. They are very colorful flowers.

3. There goes David. He is the owner of many businesses.

4. For dinner we had my favorite desserts. We had strawberry pie and cherry nut cake.

5. Last night I talked with Leon. He is my neighbor. He is my business partner.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. Sonja, a girl from Poland, sits beside me in English class.

2. On the deck are many plants, very colorful flowers.
        - or -
    On the deck are very colorful flowers, many plants.

3. There goes David, the owner of many businesses.

4. For dinner we had my favorite desserts, strawberry pie and cherry nut cake.
        - or -
    For dinner we had strawberry pie and cherry nut cake, my favorite desserts.

5. Last night I talked with Leon, my neighbor and business partner.


For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html.

Thursday, February 11, 2021

Lesson 129 - Parts of the Sentence - Appositives

View lesson on Daily Grammar
 
An appositive is a word or group of words that identifies or renames the noun or pronoun that it follows. It is set off by commas unless closely tied to the word that it identifies or renames. ("Closely tied" means that it is needed to identify the word.) 
 
Appositives should not be confused with predicate nominatives. A verb will separate the subject from the predicate nominative. An appositive can follow any noun or pronoun including the subject, direct object, or predicate nominative.
 
Examples: 
My son Carl is a medical technician. (no commas) 
Badger, our dog with a missing leg, has a love for cats. (commas needed)

Appositives may be compound. 
 
Example: 
The two children, Wendy and Sam, are excellent students.

You can make one smooth sentence from two short, choppy sentences by using an appositive
 
Example: 
Ila won the prize. It was a trip to Hawaii. 
Ila won the prize, a trip to Hawaii.

Instructions: Combine the following sentences by using an appositive.

1. Yesterday I saw an exciting movie. It was called Goldeneye.

2. Mr. Jones will be with you shortly. He is the plant manager.

3. That woman is my neighbor. She is a well-known author.

4. Luis can do almost anything. He is a talented person.

5. Do you want to meet Barbara Jean? She is my lab assistant.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. Yesterday I saw an exciting movie, Goldeneye.
        - or -
    Yesterday I saw Goldeneye, an exciting movie.

2. Mr. Jones, the plant manager, will be with you shortly.
        - or -
    The plant manager Mr. Jones will be with you shortly.

3. That woman, a well-known author, is my neighbor.
        - or -
    That woman, my neighbor, is a well-known author.
        - or -
    That woman is my neighbor, a well-known author.

4. Luis, a talented person, can do almost anything.

5. Do you want to meet Barbara Jean, my lab assistant?
       - or -
    Do you want to meet my lab assistant Barbara Jean?


For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html.

Wednesday, February 10, 2021

Lesson 128 - Parts of the Sentence - Appositives

View lesson on Daily Grammar
 
An appositive is a word or group of words that identifies or renames the noun or pronoun that it follows. It is set off by commas unless closely tied to the word that it identifies or renames. ("Closely tied" means that it is needed to identify the word.) 
 
Appositives should not be confused with predicate nominatives. A verb will separate the subject from the predicate nominative. An appositive can follow any noun or pronoun including the subject, direct object, or predicate nominative.
 
Examples: 
My son Carl is a medical technician. (no commas) 
Badger, our dog with a missing leg, has a love for cats. (commas needed)

Appositives may be compound. 
 
Example: 
The two children, Wendy and Sam, are excellent students.

Instructions: Identify the appositives in the following sentences and tell whether they are appositives to subjects, direct objects, or predicate nominatives.

1. Our leading scorer is Michael, the center and captain of the team.

2. These two students, Kay and Eric, are new to our school.

3. The doctor helped two patients, the boy with the broken leg and the girl with a burned arm.

4. Our neighbors, the Smiths and the Fehers, are moving next week.

5. James loves two games, checkers and chess.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. center/captain = appositives to predicate nominative, Michael

2. Kay/Eric = appositives to subject, students

3. boy/girl = appositives to direct objects, patients

4. Smiths/Fehers = appositives to subject, neighbors

5. checkers/chess = appositives to direct object, games


For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html.