Wednesday, April 24, 2019

Lesson 178 - Parts of the Sentence - Prepositional Phrases

View lesson on Daily Grammar

A preposition is a word that begins a prepositional phrase and shows the relationship between its object and another word in the sentence. A preposition must always have an object. A prepositional phrase starts with a preposition, ends with an object, and may have modifiers between the preposition and object of the preposition.

Here is a list of common words that can be used as prepositions: about, above, across, after, against, along, among, around, at, before, behind, below, beneath, beside, besides, between, beyond, but (when it means except), by, concerning, down, during, except, for, from, in, inside, into, like, near, of, off, on, out, outside, over, past, since, through, to, toward, under, until, up, upon, with, within, and without.

These words can be used as other parts of speech. What part of speech it is depends on how it is used in that sentence. Many of the common words used as prepositions can be used as adverbs. They are prepositions if they have an object to complete them. To decide which it is, say the preposition followed by whom or what. If a noun or a pronoun answers the question, the word is a preposition.

Example: The boy stood up and ran down the street. Up what? There is no object; therefore up is not a preposition. Down what? Street answers the question; therefore, down is a preposition. Down the street is the prepositional phrase starting with the preposition down and ending with the object street with a modifier the in between.

A prepositional phrase may be used as an adverb telling how, when, where, how much, and why and modifying the verb and sometimes an adjective. Adverb prepositional phrases can come anywhere in the sentence and can be moved within the sentence without changing the meaning. Only adjective prepositional phrases modify the object of the preposition in another prepositional phrase.

Instructions: Pick out the adverb prepositional phrases in these sentences and tell what they modify.

1. The boys jumped quickly over the wall.

2. The old dog is troublesome in many ways.

3. The pirate map was hidden underneath a big rock.

4. The family was waiting for us at the rest stop.

5. In the morning I will come for the plans.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. over the wall modifies the verb "jumped"

2. in many ways modifies the predicate adjective "troublesome"

3. underneath a big rock modifies the verb "was hidden"

4. for us/ at the rest stop modify the verb "was waiting"

5. in the morning/ for the plans modify the verb "will come"


For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html.

Tuesday, April 23, 2019

Lesson 177 - Parts of the Sentence - Prepositional Phrases

View lesson on Daily Grammar

A preposition is a word that begins a prepositional phrase and shows the relationship between its object and another word in the sentence. A preposition must always have an object. A prepositional phrase starts with a preposition, ends with an object, and may have modifiers between the preposition and object of the preposition.

Here is a list of common words that can be used as prepositions: about, above, across, after, against, along, among, around, at, before, behind, below, beneath, beside, besides, between, beyond, but (when it means except), by, concerning, down, during, except, for, from, in, inside, into, like, near, of, off, on, out, outside, over, past, since, through, to, toward, under, until, up, upon, with, within, and without.

These words can be used as other parts of speech. What part of speech it is depends on how it is used in that sentence. Many of the common words used as prepositions can be used as adverbs. They are prepositions if they have an object to complete them. To decide which it is, say the preposition followed by whom or what. If a noun or a pronoun answers the question, the word is a preposition.

Example: The boy stood up and ran down the street. Up what? There is no object; therefore up is not a preposition. Down what? Street answers the question; therefore, down is a preposition. Down the street is the prepositional phrase starting with the preposition down and ending with the object street with a modifier the in between.

A prepositional phrase may be used as an adjective telling which or what kind and modifying a noun or pronoun. An adjective prepositional phrase will come right after the noun or pronoun that it modifies. If there are two adjective prepositional phrases together, one will follow the other. Only adjective prepositional phrases modify the object of the preposition in another prepositional phrase.

Instructions: Pick out the adjective prepositional phrases in these sentences and tell what they modify.

1. The book on the table in the English classroom is Barbara's book.

2. The girl in the neighboring house plays the flute every night.

3. Large blocks of the hardest granite formed the walls of the new building.

4. The roads of ancient Rome connected the cities of the empire.

5. I know that man in the gray suit and the suede shoes.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. on the table modifies "book"/ in the English classroom modifies "table"

2. in the neighboring house modifies "girl"

3. of the hardest granite modifies "blocks"/ of the new building modifies "walls"

4. of ancient Rome modifies "roads"/ of the empire modifies "cities"

5. in the gray suit and the suede shoes modifies "man"


For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html.

Monday, April 22, 2019

Lesson 176 - Parts of the Sentence - Prepositional Phrases

View lesson on Daily Grammar

A preposition is a word that begins a prepositional phrase and shows the relationship between its object and another word in the sentence. A preposition must always have an object. A prepositional phrase starts with a preposition, ends with an object, and may have modifiers between the preposition and object of the preposition.

Here is a list of common words that can be used as prepositions: about, above, across, after, against, along, among, around, at, before, behind, below, beneath, beside, besides, between, beyond, but (when it means except), by, concerning, down, during, except, for, from, in, inside, into, like, near, of, off, on, out, outside, over, past, since, through, to, toward, under, until, up, upon, with, within, and without.

These words can be used as other parts of speech. What part of speech it is depends on how it is used in that sentence. Many of the common words used as prepositions can be used as adverbs. They are prepositions if they have an object to complete them. To decide which it is, say the preposition followed by whom or what. If a noun or a pronoun answers the question, the word is a preposition.

Example: The boy stood up and ran down the street. Up what? There is no object; therefore up is not a preposition. Down what? Street answers the question; therefore, down is a preposition. Down the street is the prepositional phrase starting with the preposition down and ending with the object street with a modifier the in between.

A prepositional phrase may be used as an adjective telling which or what kind and modifying a noun or pronoun. An adjective prepositional phrase will come right after the noun or pronoun that it modifies. If there are two adjective prepositional phrases together, one will follow the other. Only adjective prepositional phrases modify the object of the preposition in another prepositional phrase.

Instructions: Pick out the adjective prepositional phrases in these sentences and tell what they modify.

1. Do you remember the title of the new book about morals?

2. Our work on the planning commission covers all kinds of ideas and concepts.

3. Those immense houses on the west side of town were built recently.

4. The man in the next room is the mayor.

5. Few of the citizens had ever seen that plan.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. of the new book modifies "title"/ about morals modifies "book"

2. on the planning commission modifies "work"/ of ideas and concepts modifies "kinds"

3. on the west side modifies "houses"/ of town modifies "side"

4. in the next room modifies "man"

5. of the citizens modifies "few"


For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html.

Saturday, April 20, 2019

Quiz for Lessons 171 - 175 - Parts of the Sentence - Review

View quiz on Daily Grammar

Instructions: Using all the knowledge learned in the previous lessons, find the verb, subjects, predicate nominatives, direct objects, appositives, nouns of address, adjectives, and adverbs in the following sentences.

1. Soon John will be too big and will need far more time.

2. The city council usually runs this city fairly efficiently.

3. Unfortunately all people are not free.

4. The boat owner started the engine up and cast off the lines.

5. Mom, can I go and watch the game?

6. How can you be so slovenly?

7. Yogurt is almost completely nonfattening.

8. Mrs. Carter, that is my cousin David.

9. Art Buchwald, a humorous writer, has a really good column.

10. Did anyone call, Ann?


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. will be/will need = verbs; John = subject; big = predicate adjective; time = direct object; more = adjective modifying time; far = adverb modifying more; too = adverb modifying big; soon = adverb modifying both verbs

2. runs = verbs; city council = subject; city = direct object; the = adjective modifying subject; this = adjective modifying city; usually/ efficiently = adverbs modifying verb; fairly = adverb modifying efficiently

3. are = verb; people = subject; free = predicate adjective; all = adjective modifying subject; unfortunately/not = adverbs modifying verb

4. started/cast = verbs; owner = subject; engine = direct object to verb started; lines = direct object to verb cast; the/boat = adjectives modifying owner; the = adjective modifying engine; the = adjective modifying lines; up = adverb modifying started; off = adverb modifying cast

5. can go/(can) watch = verbs; I = subject; game = direct object to verb (can) watch; Mom = noun of address; the = adjective modifying game

6. can be = verb; you = subject; slovenly = predicate adjective modifying verb; how = adverb modifying verb; so = adverb modifying slovenly

7. is = verb; yogurt = subject; nonfattening = predicate adjective modifying subject; completely = adverb modifying nonfattening; almost = adverb modifying completely

8. is = verb; that = subject; cousin = predicate nominative; David = appositive; Mrs. Carter = noun of address; my = adjective modifying cousin

9. has = verb; Art Buchwald = subject; column = direct object; writer = appositive; a/humorous = adjectives modifying writer; a/good = adjectives modifying column; really = adverb modifying good

10. did call = verb; anyone = subject; Ann = noun of address


For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html.

Friday, April 19, 2019

Lesson 175 - Parts of the Sentence - Review

View lesson on Daily Grammar

Instructions: Using all the knowledge learned in the previous lessons, find the verb, subjects, predicate nominatives, direct objects, appositives, nouns of address, adjectives, and adverbs in the following sentences.

1. My friend called me once or twice yesterday.

2. Pam left the market slowly and very unhappily.

3. Collette, did you just have your sixth birthday?

4. Happy children never become really unhappy grownups.

5. Have you taken often that trip, an Alaskan cruise?


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. called = verb; friend = subject; me = direct object; my = adjective modifying friend; once/twice/yesterday = adverbs modifying verb

2. left = verb; Pam = subject; market = direct object; the = adjective modifying market;
slowly/unhappily = adverbs modifying verb; very = adverb modifying unhappily

3. did have = verb; you = subject; Collette = noun of address; birthday = direct object; your/sixth = adjectives modifying birthday; just = adverb modifying verb

4. become = verb; children = subject; grownups = predicate nominative; happy = adjective modifying subject; unhappy = adjective modifying grownups; never = adverb modifying verb; really = adverb modifying unhappy

5. have taken = verb; you = subject; trip = direct object; cruise = appositive; that = adjective modifying trip; an/Alaskan = adjectives modifying cruise; often = adverb modifying verb


For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html. Our lessons are also available to purchase in an eBook and a Workbook format.

Thursday, April 18, 2019

Lesson 174 - Parts of the Sentence - Review

View lesson on Daily Grammar

Instructions: Using all the knowledge learned in the previous lessons, find the verb, subjects, predicate nominatives, direct objects, appositives, nouns of address, adjectives, and adverbs in the following sentences.

1. The small children stumbled clumsily and tumbled down.

2. Shortly the weather could be bitterly cold again.

3. Wait here patiently and remain perfectly silent.

4. The chipmunk darted in quickly and instantly grabbed the fallen acorn.

5. The new friend was the tall, handsome boy.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. stumbled/tumbled = verbs; children = subject; the/small = adjectives modifying children; clumsily = adverb modifying stumbled; down = adverb modifying tumbled

2. could be = verb; weather = subject; cold = predicate adjective; shortly/again = adverbs modifying verb; bitterly = adverb modifying cold; the = adjective modifying subject

3. wait/remain = verbs; you (understood) = subject; silent = predicate adjective to verb remain; here/patiently = adverbs modifying wait; perfectly = adverb modifying silent

4. darted/grabbed = verbs; chipmunk = subject; acorn = direct object to verb grabbed; the = adjective modifying chipmunk; the/fallen = adjectives modifying acorn; in/quickly = adverbs modifying darted; instantly = adverb modifying grabbed

5. was = verb; friend = subject; boy = predicate nominative; the/new = adjective modifying friend; the/tall/handsome = adjectives modifying boy


For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html.

Wednesday, April 17, 2019

Lesson 173 - Parts of the Sentence - Review

View lesson on Daily Grammar

Instructions: Using all the knowledge learned in the previous lessons, find the verb, subjects, predicate nominatives, direct objects, appositives, nouns of address, adjectives, and adverbs in the following sentences.

1. Ila and I diligently prepared the garden and planted carefully the corn seeds.

2. The legislators are heatedly debating the gun issue.

3. Have you ever seen that beautiful butterfly bush?

4. Eric looked around rather hastily and ran away quickly.

5. Suddenly the siren sounded loudly and sharply.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. prepared/planted = verbs; Ila/I = subjects; garden = direct object to verb prepared; seeds = direct object to verb planted; the = adjective modifying garden; the/corn = adjectives modifying seeds; diligently = adverb modifying prepared; carefully = adverb modifying planted

2. are debating = verb; legislators = subject; issue = direct object; the = adjective modifying legislators; the/gun = adjectives modifying issue; heatedly = adverb modifying verb

3. have seen = verb; you = subject; bush = direct object; that/beautiful/butterfly = adjectives modifying bush; ever = adverb modifying verb

4. looked/ran = verbs; Eric = subject; around/hastily = adverbs modifying looked; rather = adverb modifying hastily; away/quickly = adverbs modifying ran

5. sounded = verb; siren = subject; the = adjective modifying siren; suddenly/loudly/sharply = adverbs modifying sounded



For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html.

Tuesday, April 16, 2019

Lesson 172 - Parts of the Sentence - Review

View lesson on Daily Grammar

Instructions: Using all the knowledge learned in the previous lessons, find the verb, subjects, predicate nominatives, direct objects, appositives, nouns of address, adjectives, and adverbs in the following sentences.

1. Jerry, I arrived back just now.

2. This building has never seemed especially high before.

3. Today we ate an extremely good grapefruit, our breakfast.

4. A raccoon was busily washing its food.

5. The winding path had become somewhat steep and slightly uneven.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. arrived = verb; I = subject; Jerry = noun of address; back/now = adverbs modifying the verb; just = adverb modifying adverb now

2. has seemed = verb; building = subject; high = predicate adjective modifying subject; this = adjective modifying subject, never/before = adverb modifying verb; especially = adverb modifying adjective high

3. ate = verb; we = subject; grapefruit = direct object; breakfast = appositive; an/good = adjectives modifying grapefruit; our = adjective modifying breakfast; today = adverb modifying verb; extremely = adverb modifying adjective good

4. was washing = verb; raccoon = subject; food = direct object; a = adjective modifying raccoon; its = adjective modifying food; busily = adverb modifying verb

5. had become = verb; path = subject; steep/uneven = predicate adjectives modifying subject; the/winding = adjectives modifying path; somewhat = adverb modifying predicate adjective steep; slightly = adverb modifying predicate adjective uneven



For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html.

Monday, April 15, 2019

Lesson 171 - Parts of the Sentence - Review

View lesson on Daily Grammar

Instructions: Using all the knowledge learned in the previous lessons, identify the words in bold as a verb, noun, pronoun, adjective, or adverb in the following sentences.

1. Did you see the oil well in Canada? Most of us have not been there.

2. I do my assignments well. Jeff is also fast and efficient.

3. Mother drives too fast. Surely she should drive better.

4. This isn't a long diet. Maybe you should fast more often.

5. Have you been here long? Did you come by the back way?

6. I often long for the good old days of the '50's.

7. State Street heads south, the most direct route.

8. Citizens, on most summer days we have a south wind each evening.

9. I once lived in the South. Our family still goes back for visits.

10. This highway is a better road than the dirt one.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. well = noun, most = pronoun

2. well = adverb. fast = adjective

3. fast = adverb, better = adverb

4. this = pronoun, long = adjective, fast = verb

5. long = adverb, back = adjective

6. long = verb

7. south = adverb, most = adverb

8. most = adjective, south = adjective

9. South = noun, back = adverb

10. this = adjective, better = adjective


For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html.

Saturday, April 13, 2019

Quiz for Lessons 166-170 - Parts of the Sentence - Adverbs

View quiz on Daily Grammar

Instructions: Find the adverbs in the following sentences and tell what word they modify.

1. You are almost always the leader.

2. Please turn around slowly, Ted.

3. Now we will try this totally complicated case.

4. Again and again he had been warned about the very extreme weather.

5. Certainly he looks decidedly older in that somewhat dim light.

6. The missing document reappeared suddenly and rather mysteriously.

7. I will never come here again.

8. Pavarotti sings very well.

9. Today you surely will tell a totally truthful story.

10. Almost every answer has been quickly and assuredly given.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. almost modifies the adverb always telling how much, always modifies the verb are telling when

2. please/around/slowly modify the verb turn telling how

3. now modifies the verb will try telling when, totally modifies the adjective complicated telling how much

4. again/again modify the verb had been warned telling when, very modifies the adjective extreme telling how much

5. certainly modifies the verb looks telling how, decidedly modifies the adjective older telling how much, somewhat modifies the adjective dim telling how much

6. suddenly/mysteriously modify the verb reappeared telling how, rather modifies the adverb mysteriously telling how much

7. never/again modify the verb will come telling when, here modifies the verb will come telling where

8, well modifies the verb sings telling how, very modifies the adverb well telling how much

9. today modifies the verb will tell telling when, surely modifies the verb will tell telling how, totally modifies the adjective truthful telling how much

10. quickly/assuredly modify the verb has been given telling how, almost modifies the adjective every telling how much


For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html.

Friday, April 12, 2019

Lesson 170 - Parts of the Sentence - Adverbs

View lesson on Daily Grammar

Adverbs are words that modify (1) verbs, (2) adjectives, and (3) other adverbs. They tell how (manner), when (time), where (place), how much (degree), and why (cause). Why is a common one-word adverb that tells why. Adverbs that tell us how, when, where, and why always modify the verb. These adverbs can shift location in the sentence without changing meaning or what they modify. Adverbs that tell us how much modify adjectives or other adverbs. Adverbs that tell how much will come just before the adjectives or adverbs that they modify. These adverbs are also called qualifiers because they strengthen or weaken the words they modify. Examples: He kicked the ball solidly (how). He kicked the ball immediately (when). He kicked the ball forward (where). He kicked the ball too hard (how much).

Not and its contraction n't are adverbs. They really modify the entire sentence, but we will have them modify the verb as it is the most important word in the sentence. This is a common practice in grammar books.

Instructions: Find the adverbs in the following sentences and tell what word they modify.

1. The completely exhausted boater was quickly pulled aboard.

2. The manager has called me once or twice about policy.

3. Usually these antibiotics work rather slowly.

4. The Christmas decorations surely weren't very expensive.

5. Harry greedily had too much candy.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. completely modifies the adjective exhausted telling how much, quickly modifies the verb was pulled telling how, aboard modifies the verb was pulled telling where

2. once/twice modify the verb has called telling when

3. usually/slowly modify the verb work telling how, rather modifies the adverb slowly telling how much

4. surely/n't modify the verb were telling how, very modifies the predicate adjective expensive telling how much

5. greedily modifies the verb had telling how, too modifies the adjective much telling how much


For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html.

Thursday, April 11, 2019

Lesson 169 - Parts of the Sentence - Adverbs

View lesson on Daily Grammar

Adverbs are words that modify (1) verbs, (2) adjectives, and (3) other adverbs. They tell how (manner), when (time), where (place), how much (degree), and why (cause). Why is a common one-word adverb that tells why. Adverbs that tell us how, when, where, and why always modify the verb. These adverbs can shift location in the sentence without changing meaning or what they modify. Adverbs that tell us how much modify adjectives or other adverbs. Adverbs that tell how much will come just before the adjectives or adverbs that they modify. These adverbs are also called qualifiers because they strengthen or weaken the words they modify. Examples: He kicked the ball solidly (how). He kicked the ball immediately (when). He kicked the ball forward (where). He kicked the ball too hard (how much).

Not and its contraction n't are adverbs. They really modify the entire sentence, but we will have them modify the verb as it is the most important word in the sentence. This is a common practice in grammar books.

Instructions: Find the adverbs in the following sentences and tell what word they modify.

1. I am too tired to play.

2. I am very sorry about your extremely sore leg.

3. The storm was almost completely over at noon.

4. You look so much better.

5. Your father looks rather feeble.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. too modifies the predicate adjective tired telling how much

2. very modifies the predicate adjective sorry telling how much, extremely modifies the adjective sore telling how much

3. almost modifies the adverb completely telling how much, completely modifies the predicate adjective over telling how much

4. so modifies the adverb much telling how much, much modifies the predicate adjective better telling how much

5. rather modifies the predicate adjective feeble telling how much


For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html.

Wednesday, April 10, 2019

Lesson 168 - Parts of the Sentence - Adverbs

View lesson on Daily Grammar

Adverbs are words that modify (1) verbs, (2) adjectives, and (3) other adverbs. They tell how (manner), when (time), where (place), how much (degree), and why (cause). Why is a common one-word adverb that tells why. Adverbs that tell us how, when, where, and why always modify the verb. These adverbs can shift location in the sentence without changing meaning or what they modify. Adverbs that tell us how much modify adjectives or other adverbs. Adverbs that tell how much will come just before the adjectives or adverbs that they modify. These adverbs are also called qualifiers because they strengthen or weaken the words they modify. Examples: He kicked the ball solidly (how). He kicked the ball immediately (when). He kicked the ball forward (where). He kicked the ball too hard (how much).

Not and its contraction n't are adverbs. They really modify the entire sentence, but we will have them modify the verb as it is the most important word in the sentence. This is a common practice in grammar books.

Instructions: Find the adverbs in the following sentences and tell what word they modify.

1. Do you live here?

2. Should we play inside or outside?

3. Where is your coat, young man?

4. From the sound the bears must be nearby.

5. There he goes.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. here modifies the verb do live telling where

2. inside/outside modify the verb should play telling where

3. where modifies the verb is telling where

4. nearby modifies the verb must be telling where

5. there modifies the verb goes telling where


For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html.

Tuesday, April 9, 2019

Lesson 167 - Parts of the Sentence - Adverbs

View lesson on Daily Grammar

Adverbs are words that modify (1) verbs, (2) adjectives, and (3) other adverbs. They tell how (manner), when (time), where (place), how much (degree), and why (cause). Why is a common one-word adverb that tells why. Adverbs that tell us how, when, where, and why always modify the verb. These adverbs can shift location in the sentence without changing meaning or what they modify. Adverbs that tell us how much modify adjectives or other adverbs. Adverbs that tell how much will come just before the adjectives or adverbs that they modify. These adverbs are also called qualifiers because they strengthen or weaken the words they modify. Examples: He kicked the ball solidly (how). He kicked the ball immediately (when). He kicked the ball forward (where). He kicked the ball too hard (how much).

Not and its contraction n't are adverbs. They really modify the entire sentence, but we will have them modify the verb as it is the most important word in the sentence. This is a common practice in grammar books.

Instructions: Find the adverbs in the following sentences and tell what word they modify.

1. Now and then I become creative.

2. Soon you will see that sight again.

3. He made the corrections on the computer immediately.

4. Sometimes you make unnecessary statements.

5. Lately I take walks often.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. now/then modify the verb become telling when

2. soon/again modify the verb will see telling when

3. immediately modifies the verb made telling when

4. sometimes modifies the verb make telling when

5. lately/often modify the verb take telling when


For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html.