Tuesday, January 28, 2020

Lesson 377 - Mechanics - Punctuation - Quotation Marks

View lesson on Daily Grammar

Use single quotation marks for a quotation within a quotation. Example: "Dad always says, 'Maybe,'" cried Pam.

Instructions: Use quotation marks where needed in these sentences.

1. Have you read The Scarlet Ibis, a very good short story? asked the teacher.

2. He replied, I know she said, I am not sure.

3. Everyone will read the chapter entitled Africa for tomorrow, commanded the substitute teacher.

4. The witness answered, I heard the officer say Put down the gun!

5. This famous painting Square Sunlight has won many awards, stated the guide.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. "Have you read 'The Scarlet Ibis,' a very good short story?" asked the teacher.

2. He replied, "I know she said, 'I am not sure.'"

3. "Everyone will read the chapter entitled 'Africa' for tomorrow," commanded the substitute teacher.

4. The witness answered, "I heard the officer say 'Put down the gun!'"

5. "This famous painting 'Square Sunlight' has won many awards," stated the guide.



For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html.

Monday, January 27, 2020

Lesson 376 - Mechanics - Punctuation - Quotation Marks

View lesson on Daily Grammar

Use quotation marks around the titles of short stories, short plays, short poems and short musical compositions; of art works, articles, chapters, essays, and speeches; of radio and television programs. Example: My favorite painting is "Blue Boy."

Instructions: Use quotation marks where needed in these sentences.

1. I was very interested in the article Our Missing President.

2. I loved the old television program Maverick.

3. Have you read Miniver Cheevy, the short narrative poem?

4. At Christmas time I love to read The Gift of the Magi, a short story by O. Henry.

5. That song playing is Greensleeves, isn't it?


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. I was very interested in the article "Our Missing President."

2. I loved the old television program "Maverick."

3. Have you read "Miniver Cheevy," the short narrative poem?

4. At Christmas time I love to read "The Gift of the Magi," a short story by O. Henry.

5. That song playing is "Greensleeves," isn't it?



 For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html.

Saturday, January 25, 2020

Quiz for Lessons 371 - 375 - Mechanics - Punctuation - Quotation Marks

View quiz on Daily Grammar

Instructions: Use quotation marks and capitals where needed in these sentences.

1. That is an interesting story, said Sarah.

2. Could you, asked Jack, tell us some more stories?

3. I like old stories from long ago, remarked Jane. My mother used to read them to me.

4. Joe said that he had heard the story before.

5. I doubt that you know what your are talking about, stated Charlie. Well, replied Joe, you are incorrect this time. Charlie looking at Joe then said, I apologize for my unkind remark.

6. The children said that they would look for more books with interesting old stories.

7. Have you ever been to Persia? asked Henry. No, I haven't, said Bill, and it is not called Persia now. What is is called now, inquired Jane.

8. Look, cried Sarah, Mom is bringing refreshments!

9. This sure has been a fun day, guys, giggled Jack.

10. I hope we can do this again soon, said Bill. There is so much to learn from good stories.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. "That is an interesting story," said Sarah.

2. "Could you," asked Jack, "tell us some more stories?"

3. "I like old stories from long ago," remarked Jane. "My mother used to read them to me."

4. Joe said that he had heard the story before.


5. "I doubt that you know what you are talking about," stated Charlie.

"Well," replied Joe, "you are incorrect this time."

Charlie looking at Joe then said, "I apologize for my unkind remark."


6. The children said that they would look for more books with interesting old stories.


7. "Have you ever been to Persia?" asked Henry.

"No, I haven't," said Bill, "and it is not called Persia now."

"What is is called now?" inquired Jane.


8. "Look," cried Sarah, "Mom is bringing refreshments!"

9. "This sure has been a fun day, guys," giggled Jack.

10. "I hope we can do this again soon," said Bill. "There is so much to learn from good stories."



For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html.

Friday, January 24, 2020

Lesson 375 - Mechanics - Punctuation - Quotation Marks

View lesson on Daily Grammar

If a quotation has more than one paragraph, use quotation marks at the beginning of each paragraph and at the end of the last paragraph of the quotation.

Instructions: Use quotation marks where needed in these sentences.

1. This is one person's quoted idea about happiness.

Happiness is the object and design of our existence; and will be the end thereof, if we pursue the path that leads to it.

Pleasure is often confused with happiness but is by no means synonymous with it. Pleasure, unlike happiness, is that which pleases us or gives us gratification. Usually it endures for only a short time.

We are enticed daily to pursue worldly pleasures that may divert us from the path to happiness. But the path to true happiness is virtue, uprightness, faithfulness, holiness, and keeping all the commandments of God.

2. This is a quoted story about Ali Hafed.

Ali Hafed was a wealthy ancient Persian who owned much land and many productive fields, orchards, and gardens, and loaned money out at interest.

One day an old priest came to him and told him that if he had a diamond the size of his thumb, he could purchase a dozen farms like his. He told Ali Hafed where to find such a diamond.

Ali Hafed sold his farm, collected his money that was at interest, and left his family in the charge of a neighbor. He left in search of diamonds. After years of searching, his money was spent, and he passed away in rags and wretchedness.

The man who purchased Ali Hafed's farm one day led his camel out into the garden to drink, and as the animal put his nose into the shallow waters, the farmer noticed a curious flash of light in the white sands of the stream. Reaching in, he pulled out a black stone which proved to be a diamond. This marked the discovery of the diamond mines of Golconda, the most valuable diamond mines in the history of the ancient world.

Had Ali Hafed remained at home and dug in his own cellar, or anywhere in his own fields, rather than traveling in strange lands where he eventually faced starvation and ruin, he would have had acres of diamonds.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. "Happiness is the object and design of our existence; and will be the end thereof, if we pursue the path that leads to it.

"Pleasure is often confused with happiness but is by no means synonymous with it. Pleasure, unlike happiness, is that which pleases us or gives us gratification. Usually it endures for only a short time.

"We are enticed daily to pursue worldly pleasures that may divert us from the path to happiness. But the path to true happiness is virtue, uprightness, faithfulness, holiness, and keeping all the commandments of God."


2. "Ali Hafed was a wealthy ancient Persian who owned much land and many productive fields, orchards, and gardens, and loaned money out at interest.

"One day an old priest came to him and told him that if he had a diamond the size of his thumb, he could purchase a dozen farms like his. He told Ali Hafed where to find such a diamond.

"Ali Hafed sold his farm, collected his money that was at interest, and left his family in the charge of a neighbor. He left in search of diamonds. After years of searching, his money was spent, and he passed away in rags and wretchedness.

"The man who purchased Ali Hafed's farm one day led his camel out into the garden to drink, and as the animal put his nose into the shallow waters, the farmer noticed a curious flash of light in the white sands of the stream. Reaching in, he pulled out a black stone which proved to be a diamond. This marked the discovery of the diamond mines of Golconda, the most valuable diamond mines in the history of the ancient world.

"Had Ali Hafed remained at home and dug in his own cellar, or anywhere in his own fields, rather than traveling in strange lands where he eventually faced starvation and ruin, he would have had acres of diamonds."



For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html.

Thursday, January 23, 2020

Lesson 374 - Mechanics - Punctuation - Quotation Marks

View lesson on Daily Grammar

Begin a new paragraph with each change of speaker in dialogue.

Example:

"Can I count on you?" asked Carl.

"Yes, you can," said Matthew.

"You cannot fail us," replied Claudia.

Instructions: Make new paragraphs and place quotation marks where needed in the following dialogues.

1. Knock on the door. I will be right behind you, said John. I am afraid, said James. You are bigger and older so you knock. I will do it. Why are you worried about it? It is just Halloween, interrupted Matthew, and there is nothing scary about this house.

2. Chantelle said, I never get to be the mother when we play. You can be the mother today, replied Hayley. When will I get to be the mother? asked Alise. You are too little, replied Hayley and Chantelle.

3. We are going to have a new baby, said Ann. I hope it is a boy, said Chris. We need a boy in the family. I want it to be a girl, remarked Rebecca. I don't care, said Allison. I just hope it hurries up.

4. Do you want to play on the computer with me, Mark? asked Todd. I am too little, said Mark. Mommy won't let me. Todd, you wouldn’t let him play very much if he could, stated Stephanie. Todd said, I am going to change and let him now.

5. Lindsay asked, Do we have everything for the trip? I hope so, replied Boyd. Did you get everything for Celeste? I have had it ready all day, said Lindsay.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. "Knock on the door. I will be right behind you," said John.

"I am afraid," said James. "You are bigger and older so you knock."

"I will do it. Why are you worried about it? It is just Halloween," interrupted Matthew, "and there is nothing scary about this house."


2. Chantelle said, "I never get to be the mother when we play."

"You can be the mother today," replied Hayley.

"When will I get to be the mother?" asked Elise.

"You are too little," replied Hayley and Chantelle.


3. "We are going to have a new baby," said Ann.

"I hope it is a boy," said Chris. "We need a boy in the family."

"I want it to be a girl," remarked Rebecca.

"I don't care," said Allison. "I just hope it hurries up."


4. "Do you want to play on the computer with me, Mark?" asked Todd.

"I am too little," said Mark. "Mommy won't let me."

"Todd, you wouldn’t let him play very much if he could," stated Stephanie.

Todd said, "I am going to change and let him now."


5. Lindsay asked, "Do we have everything for the trip?"

"I hope so," replied Boyd. "Did you get everything for Celeste?"

"I have had it ready all day," said Lindsay.



For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html.

Wednesday, January 22, 2020

Lesson 373 - Mechanics - Punctuation - Quotation Marks

View lesson on Daily Grammar

Use no quotation marks with indirect quotations. An indirect quotation often begins with the word that. Example: Betty said that she wished the election was final.

Instructions: Use quotation marks where needed in these sentences.

1. James stated that he had won the race.

2. Richard said, I was in second place until I fell.

3. Mom said that she was worried when she saw it happen.

4. Sue said, that was too bad.

5. I hope that you had fun, anyway, said his dad.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. James stated that he had won the race.

2. Richard said, "I was in second place until I fell."

3. Mom said that she was worried when she saw it happen.

4. Sue said, "That was too bad."

5. "I hope that you had fun, anyway," said his dad.



For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html.

Tuesday, January 21, 2020

Lesson 372 - Mechanics - Punctuation - Quotation Marks

View lesson on Daily Grammar

Use quotation marks around the exact words of a speaker. When the words identifying the speaker come between the parts of the quotation, put quotation marks around each part. Example: "Yes," said Jack, "I will be there."

Use one set of quotation marks for two or more sentences not broken by explanatory material. Example: "I know that. He has known for several days," said Jim. If part of the quotation is a new sentence use a capital letter. Example: "I know that," said Jim. "He has known for several days."

Instructions: Use quotation marks and capitals where needed in these sentences.

1. We will be in town tomorrow night. Don't wait up. We will come by the next day, said Jeanne.

2. We want you to stay with us, answered Barbara. we'll meet you at the station.

3. Okay, replied Chris, bring the car around.

4. Are the girls ready to go? asked Ann. they need to leave now.

5. Yes, replied Ila, that play was really enjoyable.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. "We will be in town tomorrow night. Don't wait up. We will come by the next day," said Jeanne.

2. "We want you to stay with us," answered Barbara. "We'll meet you at the station."

3. "Okay," replied Chris, "bring the car around."

4. "Are the girls ready to go?" asked Ann. "They need to leave now."

5. "Yes," replied Ila, "that play was really enjoyable."



For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html.

Monday, January 20, 2020

Lesson 371 - Mechanics - Punctuation - Quotation Marks

View lesson on Daily Grammar

Use quotation marks around the exact words of a speaker. Example: He said, "I saw that." "I saw it too," she said.

Instructions: Use quotation marks where needed in these sentences.

1. I wish the election were over, said Fred.

2. Will they finish this week? asked Frida.

3. Willard added, It is becoming a joke.

4. We can now see that every vote counts, concluded Sara.

5. Yes, we know that we should vote every time, commented Jeff.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. "I wish the election was over," said Fred.

2. "Will they finish this week?" asked Frida.

3. Willard added, "It is becoming a joke!"

4. "We can now see that every vote counts," concluded Sara.

5. "Yes, we know that we should vote every time," commented Jeff.



For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html.

Saturday, January 18, 2020

Quiz for Lessons 366 - 370 - Mechanics - Punctuation - Commas

View quiz on Daily Grammar

Instructions: Place commas or other punctuation where they are needed.

1. "Is it time to go " asked Irene.

2. "I did not do it " said the convict "I wasn't even here yesterday."

3. He wanted to go to the party but no one would give him a ride.

4. He had read all the trilogy; consequently he didn't have a new book to read.

5. He exclaimed "Don't go that way!"

6. "You didn't " she said "tell me that you felt that way."

7. "You will do what I asked or you will not get your allowance."

8. "Will you repair my car today " he asked "I need it for tomorrow."

9. "I will do my best " answered the mechanic "but I cannot guarantee that I will be finished."

10. He didn't know the final answer; thus he lost all the money.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. "Is it time to go?" asked Irene.

2. "I did not do it," said the convict. "I wasn't even here yesterday."

3. He wanted to go to the party, but no one would give him a ride.

4. He had read all the trilogy; consequently, he didn't have a new book to read.

5. He exclaimed, "Don't go that way!"

6. "You didn't," she said, "tell me that you felt that way."

7. "You will do what I asked, or you will not get your allowance."

8. "Will you repair my car today?" he asked. "I need it for tomorrow."

9. "I will do my best," answered the mechanic, "but I cannot guarantee that I will be finished."

10. He didn't know the final answer; thus, he lost all the money.



For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html.

Friday, January 17, 2020

Lesson 370 - Mechanics - Punctuation - Commas

View lesson on Daily Grammar

Use a comma or commas to separate the exact words of the speaker from the rest of the sentence unless the sense of the sentence requires some other punctuation. (In quoted words, the comma always goes inside the quotation marks.) Examples: "I can help you now," said the clerk. The clerk said, "I can help you now." You do not use a comma when you start a new sentence after the explanatory words. Example: "I did it," he said. "Leave me alone."

Instructions: Place commas or other punctuation where they are needed.

1. "I will comply with the rules " he said "Then I will work to change them."

2. "Will the rain continue " the woman asked "I need to work outdoors."

3. "I am glad I missed the game " Jim said "They played so poorly."

4. "Are you going next week " she asked "I will not be here then."

5. "When you finish your projects " the teacher remarked "put them in the basket for grading."


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. "I will comply with the rules," he said. "Then I will work to change them."

2. "Will the rain continue?" the woman asked. "I need to work outdoors."

3. "I am glad I missed the game," Jim said. "They played so poorly."

4. "Are you going next week?" she asked. "I will not be here then."

5. "When you finish your projects," the teacher remarked, "put them in the basket for grading."



For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html.

Thursday, January 16, 2020

Lesson 369 - Punctuation - Commas

View lesson on Daily Grammar

Use a comma or commas to separate the exact words of the speaker from the rest of the sentence unless the sense of the sentence requires some other punctuation. (In quoted words, the comma always goes inside the quotation marks.) Examples: "I can help you now," said the clerk. The clerk said, "I can help you now."

Instructions: Place commas or other punctuation where they are needed.

1. "I think" Marie answered "that I can help you tomorrow."

2. "I know" she replied "the answer to that question."

3. "No" he called after her "I won't forget the appointment!"

4. "Come with me" pleaded the teacher "and you will not be disappointed."

5. "Did you see" Curtis asked "the plane go down?"


--For answers scroll down.












Answers:

1. "I think," Marie answered, "that I can help you tomorrow."

2. "I know," she replied, "the answer to that question."

3. "No," he called after her, "I won't forget the appointment!"

4. "Come with me," pleaded the teacher, "and you will not be disappointed."

5. "Did you see," Curtis asked, "the plane go down?"



For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html.

Wednesday, January 15, 2020

Lesson 368 - Mechanics - Punctuation - Commas

View lesson on Daily Grammar

Use a comma or commas to separate the exact words of the speaker from the rest of the sentence unless the sense of the sentence requires some other punctuation. (In quoted words, the comma always goes inside the quotation marks.) Examples: "I can help you now," said the clerk. The clerk said, "I can help you now."

Instructions: Place commas or other punctuation where they are needed.

1. "What time is it " she asked.

2. "Come with me " said the guide.

3. "Don't leave me " shouted the little girl.

4. The man replied "I believe you."

5. The passenger inquired "What time is it?"


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. "What time is it?" she asked.

2. "Come with me," said the guide.

3. "Don't leave me!" shouted the little girl.

4. The man replied, "I believe you."

5. The passenger inquired, "What time is it?"



For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html.

Tuesday, January 14, 2020

Lesson 367 - Mechanics - Punctuation - Commas

View lesson on Daily Grammar

Use a comma after a conjunctive adverb or phrases like for example, in fact, or for instance used to join two main clauses. Common conjunctive adverbs are therefore, nevertheless, moreover, consequently, furthermore, besides, then, thus, instead, accordingly, otherwise, so, yet, still, hence, however. Example: Jill knew she could not win; nevertheless, she kept running.

Instructions: Place commas where they are needed.

1. The trip was wonderful; in fact everyone raved about it.

2. Will wants a promotion; therefore he is working overtime.

3. I do not believe a word he says; otherwise I would listen to his presentation.

4. You seem to be well-qualified; however your price is too high.

5. Your goals are unclear to me; so I will not vote for you.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. The trip was wonderful; in fact, everyone raved about it.

2. Will wants a promotion; therefore, he is working overtime.

3. I do not believe a word he says; otherwise, I would listen to his presentation.

4. You seem to be well-qualified; however, your price is too high.

5. Your goals are unclear to me; so, I will not vote for you.



For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html.

Monday, January 13, 2020

Lesson 366 - Mechanics - Punctuation - Commas

View lesson on Daily Grammar

Use a comma before the coordinate conjunctions that join independent clauses in a compound sentence. (Very short clauses joined by and may omit the comma.) Examples: Harry will leave on the next flight, but you will join him in a week. You wash and I will dry.

Instructions: Place commas where they are needed.

1. She walked and he ran.

2. I went to New York by train but I returned by plane.

3. I neither like you nor will I assist you in your request.

4. He will have to help or the project will not be completed.

5. The boss will be here tomorrow and we will ask for a raise.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. She walked and he ran. (no comma needed, but you would not be wrong to use one after walked)

2. I went to New York by train, but I returned by plane.

3. I neither like you, nor will I assist you in your request.

4. He will have to help, or the project will not be completed.

5. The boss will be here tomorrow, and we will ask for a raise.



For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html.

Saturday, January 11, 2020

Quiz for Lessons 361 - 365 - Mechanics - Punctuation - Commas

View quiz on Daily Grammar

Instructions: Place commas where they are needed.

1. Within the business was in turmoil.

2. Matthew is going to law school; John to the Air Force.

3. To Jim Ryan is a hero.

4. I like Halloween; Mother Thanksgiving; Barbara Christmas.

5. The antique which avoided being broken for many years was given to my grandmother by George Washington.

6. An apple not an orange keeps the doctor away.

7. We are still going on the hike aren't we?

8. The letter sent through the mail changed the course of the war.

9. You really like her don't you!

10. A person's personality not his looks really is important in a husband.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. Within, the business was in turmoil.

2. Matthew is going to law school; John, to the Air Force.

3. To Jim, Ryan is a hero.

4. I like Halloween; Mother, Thanksgiving; Barbara, Christmas.

5. The antique, which avoided being broken for many years, was given to my grandmother by George Washington.

6. An apple, not an orange, keeps the doctor away.

7. We are still going on the hike, aren't we?

8. The letter, sent through the mail, changed the course of the war.

9. You really like her, don't you!

10. A person's personality, not his looks, really is important in a husband.



For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html.

Friday, January 10, 2020

Lesson 365 - Mechanics - Punctuation - Commas

View lesson on Daily Grammar

Use a comma wherever necessary for clarity to prevent misreading. Example: Beneath, the water sparkled brilliantly. (clear) Beneath the water sparkled brilliantly. (Confusing)

Instructions: Place commas where they are needed.

1. To write one must spend much time revising and proofreading.

2. After washing the boy left for the game.

3. Although a real diamond mine is rather small.

4. Inside the store contained many beautiful statues.

5. When eating a person should use good manners.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. To write, one must spend much time revising and proofreading.

2. After washing, the boy left for the game.

3. Although a real diamond, mine is rather small.

4. Inside, the store contained many beautiful statues.

5. When eating, a person should use good manners.



For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html.

Thursday, January 9, 2020

Lesson 364 - Mechanics - Punctuation - Commas

View lesson on Daily Grammar

Use commas to set off nonrestrictive clauses and phrases. Nonrestrictive clauses and phrases are modifiers that can be omitted without changing the meaning of the main clause. Example: Our new boat, which we bought last week, is a pleasure to use. (The adjective clause "which we bought last week" is not needed to understand the meaning of the main clause.)

Instructions: Place commas where they are needed.

1. The Jazz which is a much different team from last year start the season next week.

2. The waiter balancing two trays of food saw our signal for the check.

3. Ads which are essential to our economy are very annoying much of the time.

4. For this job we need a person who is very creative.

5. The new baby delivered in the taxi changed our lives completely.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. The Jazz, which is a much different team from last year, start the season next week.

2. The waiter, balancing two trays of food, saw our signal for the check.

3. Ads, which are essential to our economy, are very annoying much of the time.

4. For this job we need a person who is very creative. (The clause "who is very creative" is needed for the meaning of the main sentence so we would not use any comma.)

5. The new baby, delivered in the taxi, changed our lives completely.



For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html.

Wednesday, January 8, 2020

Lesson 363 - Mechanics - Punctuation - Commas

View lesson on Daily Grammar

Use commas to set off contrasted expressions. Example: His mother, not his father, is in charge.

Instructions: Place commas where they are needed.

1. Your car not your truck is the better vehicle to use.

2. My aunt not my uncle used to live here before.

3. You need to talk to the man at the end of the table not the one near the window.

4. Our track team not our baseball team won the championship.

5. Be sure to see the owner not the manager about the job.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. Your car, not your truck, is the better vehicle to use.

2. My aunt, not my uncle, used to live here before.

3. You need to talk to the man at the end of the table, not the one near the window.

4. Our track team, not our baseball team, won the championship.

5. Be sure to see the owner, not the manager, about the job.



For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html.

Tuesday, January 7, 2020

Lesson 362 - Mechanics - Punctuation - Commas

View lesson on Daily Grammar

Use a comma when words are omitted from parallel clauses in a compound sentence. Example: Mother baked an apple pie, and Aunt Gayle, a chocolate cake.

Instructions: Place commas where they are needed.

1. Fred asked the question; Sarah the answer.

2. I like classical music; my wife country music.

3. Ann graduated from Utah State University, and Boyd Arizona State University.

4. This box has the books, and that box the recordings.

5. Stephanie told a funny story; Alaina a scary one.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. Fred asked the question; Sarah, the answer.

2. I like classical music; my wife, country music.

3. Ann graduated from Utah State University, and Boyd, Arizona State University.

4. This box has the books, and that box, the recordings.

5. Stephanie told a funny story; Alaina, a scary one.



For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html.

Monday, January 6, 2020

Lesson 361 - Mechanics - Punctuation - Commas

View lesson on Daily Grammar

Use a comma to set off a short clause at the end of the sentence to change a statement into a question or an exclamatory sentence. Example: You are going to town, aren't you?

Instructions: Place commas where they are needed.

1. That should make them take notice shouldn't it!

2. This is a beautiful location isn't it?

3. Becky is a living miracle isn't she!

4. Joe was here this morning wasn't he?

5. The new player really tries doesn't he!


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. That should make them take notice, shouldn't it!

2. This is a beautiful location, isn't it?

3. Becky is a living miracle, isn't she!

4. Joe was here this morning, wasn't he?

5. The new player really tries, doesn't he!



For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html.

Saturday, January 4, 2020

Quiz for Lessons 356 - 360 - Mechanics - Punctuation - Comma

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Instructions: Place commas where they are needed.

1. When you return the opportunity will still await you.

2. Having done my best I sat down to see the results.

3. To get the job done you will need to pace yourself.

4. During the last game of the World Series a riot took place.

5. His face stern and set told me that I was in trouble.

6. The answer without doubt will make all the difference.

7. After you finish doing the dishes the floor needs mopping.

8. To get the correct results you must follow the proper order of adding ingredients.

9. Trying to secure the boat the man fell haplessly into the water.

10. In view of the recent events in the Middle East peace does not seem likely.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. When you return, the opportunity will still await you.

2. Having done my best, I sat down to see the results.

3. To get the job done, you will need to pace yourself.

4. During the last game of the World Series, a riot took place.

5. His face, stern and set, told me that I was in trouble.

6. The answer, without doubt, will make all the difference.

7. After you finish doing the dishes, the floor needs mopping.

8. To get the correct results, you must follow the proper order of adding ingredients.

9. Trying to secure the boat, the man fell haplessly into the water.

10. In view of the recent events in the Middle East, peace does not seem likely.



For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html.

Friday, January 3, 2020

Lesson 360 - Mechanics - Punctuation - Commas

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Use a comma or commas to set off transposed (out of their natural order) words, phrases, or other modifiers.

Example: This woman, without question, is too weak. These transposed items are very much like the introductory items, but they do not come at the beginning of the sentence.

Instructions: Place commas where they are needed.

1. Turn to increase the volume the knob to the right.

2. Very quietly the intruder closed the door.

3. Her hand cut and bruised showed the ordeal undertaken by her.

4. Sam although he likes drama seldom ever attends a play.

5. All the contestants eager and well-prepared required a good night's rest.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. Turn, to increase the volume, the knob to the right.

2. Very quietly, the intruder closed the door.

3. Her hand, cut and bruised, showed the ordeal undertaken by her.

4. Sam, although he likes drama, seldom ever attends a play.

5. All the contestants, eager and well-prepared, required a good night's rest.



For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html.

Thursday, January 2, 2020

Lesson 359 - Mechanics - Punctuation - Commas

View lesson on Daily Grammar

Use a comma after long introductory prepositional phrases or two or more consecutive prepositional phrases. Examples: At the entrance to the cave, the guide gave us instructions. During those hot, boring summer days, time passed very slowly.

Instructions: Place commas where they are needed.

1. After the wreck into the pine tree the car was towed away.

2. Into the woods during the shower ran the black horse.

3. After the long and exhausting trip we finally arrived at our destination.

4. In the hall closet on the top shelf you will find the material I need.

5. Through the vast expanse of space the astronauts traveled continuously.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. After the wreck into the pine tree, the car was towed away.

2. Into the woods during the shower, ran the black horse.

3. After the long and exhausting trip, we finally arrived at our destination.

4. In the hall closet on the top shelf, you will find the material I need.

5. Through the vast expanse of space, the astronauts traveled continuously.



For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html.