Saturday, September 19, 2020

Quiz for Lessons 21-25 - Parts of Speech - Pronouns

View quiz on Daily Grammar

Instructions: Find the personal pronouns. Tell if they are intensive, reflexive, or possessive, and if they have an antecedent, name it.

1. I want you yourself to come tomorrow.

2. The decision itself is yours to make.

3. She gave herself up to the police.

4. My brother gave me his pet snake.

5. You can tie your shoe by yourself.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. I want you yourself to come tomorrow.
     yourself - intensive pronoun
     you is the antecedent for yourself

2. The decision itself is yours to make.
     itself - intensive pronoun
     yours - possessive pronoun
     decision is the antecedent for itself

3. She gave herself up to the police.
     herself - reflexive pronoun
     she is the antecedent for herself

4. My brother gave me his pet snake.
     My and his - possessive pronouns
     brother is the antecedent of his

5. You can tie your shoe by yourself.
     yourself - reflexive pronoun
     your - possessive pronoun
     you is the antecedent for your and yourself


For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html.

Friday, September 18, 2020

Lesson 25 - Parts of Speech - Pronouns

View lesson on Daily Grammar

The personal pronouns myself, yourself, yourselves, himself, herself, itself, ourselves, and themselves can also be used as intensive pronouns.

    Example:
    Carl himself won the race.

Instructions: Find the intensive pronouns in these sentences.

1. We ourselves went to the movie.

2. The man himself wrestled the alligator.

3. Jeanne herself gave us the gift.

4. They themselves had played until dark.


--For answers scroll down.












Answers:

1. We ourselves went to the movie.

2. The man himself wrestled the alligator.

3. Jeanne herself gave us the gift.

4. They themselves had played until dark.


For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html.

Thursday, September 17, 2020

Lesson 24 - Parts of Speech - Pronouns

View lesson on Daily Grammar

The personal pronouns myself, yourself, yourselves, himself, herself, itself, ourselves, and themselves are compound personal pronouns combining the personal pronoun with self or selves. They are used as reflexive pronouns.

    Example:
    Carl hurt himself.

Instructions: Find the reflexive pronouns in these sentences.

1. I should understand myself better.

2. Ann bought herself two new hamsters.

3. They can't help themselves.

4. The boy cut himself on the broken glass.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. I should understand myself better.

2. Ann bought herself two new hamsters.

3. They can't help themselves.

4. The boy cut himself on the broken glass.


For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html.

Wednesday, September 16, 2020

Lesson 23 - Parts of Speech - Pronouns

View lesson on Daily Grammar

Some personal pronouns are called possessives because they show whose something is. They are the following pronouns: my, mine, your, yours, his, her, hers, its, our, ours, their, and theirs.

    Example:
    The money is mine.
    (Mine tells whose money it is.)

Instructions: Find the possessive pronouns in the following sentences.

1. The new car is his.

2. Yours will be here tomorrow.

3. I like theirs best.

4. Should we go for a ride in his or hers.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. The new car is his.

2. Yours will be here tomorrow.

3. I like theirs best.

4. Should we go for a ride in his or hers.


For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html.

Tuesday, September 15, 2020

Lesson 22 - Parts of Speech - Pronouns

View lesson on Daily Grammar

The word for which the pronoun stands is called its antecedent. It may be in the same sentence, in a previous sentence, or not given at all.

    Example:
    The boy threw the football. He threw it over the fence.
     - boy is the antecedent for he
     - football is the antecedent for it

A pronoun can be an antecedent for another pronoun. The antecedent always comes before the pronoun for which it is the antecedent.

    Example:
    He likes his new car.
     - He is the antecedent for his

Instructions: Pick out the pronouns and their antecedents in these sentences.

1. He ran after his dad.

2. Jennie wanted her doll for bedtime.

3. The rabbit hopped into its hole.

4. They will help you with your work themselves.

5. The teacher gave us homework every day, and she made our lives miserable.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. He ran after his dad.
    - He is the antecedent for his

2. Jennie wanted her doll for bedtime.
    - Jennie is the antecedent for her

3. The rabbit hopped into its hole.
    - rabbit is the antecedent for its

4. They will help you with your work themselves.
    - They is the antecedent for themselves
    - you is the antecedent for your

5. The teacher gave us homework every day, and she made our lives miserable.
    - teacher is the antecedent for she
    - us is the antecedent for our


For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html.

Monday, September 14, 2020

Lesson 21 - Parts of Speech - Pronouns

View lesson on Daily Grammar

A pronoun is a word that replaces a noun or a group of words used as a noun. Pronouns are classified in five (5) different categories. They are personal pronouns, relative pronouns, demonstrative pronouns, indefinite pronouns, and interrogative pronouns. Some pronouns can appear in more than one classification. The way in which a pronoun is classified depends on how it is used in a sentence. In the next two weeks we will study the five kinds of pronouns.

Personal pronouns refer to (1) the speaker or speakers, which is called first person, and include the following pronouns: I, my, mine, me, myself, we, our, ours, us, ourselves; (2) those spoken to, which is called second person, and include the following pronouns: you, your, yours, yourself, yourselves; or (3) those spoken about, which is called third person, and includes the following pronouns: he, his, him, himself, she, her, hers, herself, it, its, itself, they, their, theirs, them, themselves. Personal pronouns can be singular (one) or plural (two or more) just as verbs and nouns.

Instructions: Find the personal pronouns in these sentences.

1. She hit him on his head.

2. I saw you at your store.

3. He himself will be our new friend.

4. It will be hard for me to see you.

5. They always get angry at her and me.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. She hit him on his head.

2. I saw you at your store.

3. He himself will be our new friend.

4. It will be hard for me to see you.

5. They always get angry at her and me.


For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html.

Saturday, September 12, 2020

Quiz for Lessons 16-20 - Parts of Speech - Nouns

View quiz on Daily Grammar

Instructions: Pick out the nouns in the following sentences and tell whether they are common or proper.

1. Mrs. Mills told the officer at the post office to weigh the package.

2. The principal at the school held Eric after the bell.

3. Sheep and horses eat grass shorter than cattle.

4. The Declaration of Independence and the Constitution are important to Americans.

5. War is a terrible thing that all nations should work to stop.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. Mrs. Mills told the officer at the post office to weigh the package.
      Mrs. Mills - proper noun
      officer, post office, package - common nouns

2. The principal at the school held Eric after the bell.
      Eric - proper noun
      principal, school, bell - common nouns

3. Sheep and horses eat grass shorter than cattle.
      Sheep, horses, grass, cattle - common nouns

4. The Declaration of Independence and the Constitution are important to Americans.
      Declaration of Independence, Constitution, Americans - proper nouns

5. War is a terrible thing that all nations should work to stop.
      War, thing, nations - common nouns


For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html.

Friday, September 11, 2020

Lesson 20 - Parts of Speech - Nouns

View lesson on Daily Grammar

Three other specific classifications for nouns are collective nouns, count nouns, and mass nouns.

Collective nouns name groups, such as team, class, and choir.

Count nouns can be counted. You can use a, an, many, or a number before count nouns. Examples include: one boy, six sheep, and many days.

Mass nouns are not countable and include words like gasoline, water, and dirt.

Instructions: Find the nouns in these sentences and classify them as collective nouns, count nouns, or mass nouns.

1. Get some gasoline, or the class will be late arriving.

2. The alien group should come by bus soon.

3. The orchestra will be playing in the arena in the evening.

4. The water at the beach was covered with oil.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. Get some gasoline, or the class will be late arriving.
      gasoline - mass noun
      class - collective noun

2. The alien group should come by bus soon.
      group - collective noun
      bus - count noun

3. The orchestra will be playing in the arena in the evening.
      orchestra - collective noun
      arena and evening - count nouns

4. The water at the beach was covered with oil.
      water and oil - mass nouns
      beach - count noun


For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html.

Thursday, September 10, 2020

Lesson 19 - Parts of Speech - Nouns

View lesson on Daily Grammar

Nouns can also be classified in specific ways. Concrete nouns, abstract nouns, and compound nouns are three such ways.

Concrete nouns name things that exist physically as sidewalk, bird, toy, hair, and rain.

Abstract nouns name ideas, characteristics, or qualities as courage, pride, goodness, and success.

Compound nouns are made up of more than one word as dining room, Bill of Rights, Jeff Hansen, and home run.

Instructions: In the following sentences find the nouns and classify them as concrete, abstract, or compound.

1. People like to see a home run hit over the wall.

2. My daughter works for the post office in Salt Lake City.

3. Rhode Island is a success although smaller than Texas.

4. Respect must be earned, but honesty should always be our policy.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. People like to see a home run hit over the wall.
      People and wall - concrete nouns
      home run - compound noun

2. My daughter works for the post office in Salt Lake City.
      daughter - concrete noun
      post office and Salt Lake City - compound nouns

3. Rhode Island is a success although smaller than Texas.
      Rhode Island - compound noun
      success - abstract noun
      Texas - concrete noun

4. Respect must be earned, but honesty should always be our policy.
      Respect, honesty, and policy - abstract nouns

Note: Compound nouns can also be concrete or abstract.


For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html.

Wednesday, September 9, 2020

Lesson 18 Parts of Speech - Nouns

View lesson on Daily Grammar

Nouns are classified into two general classifications, proper and common.  Proper nouns name a special person, place or thing and begin with capital letters.  All other nouns begin with small letters and are common nouns.

Examples of common nouns include: city, man, boat, and radio.  These could be changed into proper noun forms by naming specifics: Salt Lake City, Mr. Jones, Santa Maria, and Motorola.

Instructions: Pick out the nouns in these sentences and tell if they are common or proper.

1. Becky went with her sisters to Disneyland on Friday.

2. My youngest son is in Brazil until September.

3. Mr. Smith works with his wife in American Fork.

4. Love could bring marriage to Mark and Terri.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. Becky went with her sisters to Disneyland on Friday.
      Becky, Disneyland, Friday - proper nouns
      sisters - common noun

2. My youngest son is in Brazil until September.
      Brazil and September - proper nouns
      son - common noun

3. Mr. Smith works with his wife in American Fork.
      Mr. Smith and American Fork - proper nouns
      wife - common noun

4. Love could bring marriage to Mark and Terri.
      Mark and Terri - proper nouns
      love and marriage - common nouns
      (love is capitalized because it begins the sentence)


For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html.

Tuesday, September 8, 2020

Lesson 17 - Parts of Speech - Nouns

View lesson on Daily Grammar

Nouns can be singular (as in Lesson 16) or be plural in form.  Plural means two or more.  Plurals are formed by adding s, es, changing y to i and adding es, and with changes in spelling as in man becoming men.

      Examples:
      car, cars
      fox, foxes
      baby, babies
      man, men

Instructions: Find the nouns in the following sentences.  Some are plurals and some are not.

1. Computers are making work easier for secretaries.

2. Children always require great energies from parents.

3. Labors on farms take great effort by workers.

4. Alaina doesn't like puzzles or mathematics.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. Computers are making work easier for secretaries.

2. Children always require great energies from parents.

3. Labors on farms take great effort by workers.

4. Alaina doesn't like puzzles or mathematics.


For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html.

Monday, September 7, 2020

Lesson 16 - Parts of Speech - Nouns

View lesson on Daily Grammar

A noun is a word that names a person, place, thing, or idea.  It also one of the eight parts of speech.  Examples: man, city, book, and courage.  Nouns often follow words like a, an, and the.

Instructions: Pick out all the nouns in these sentences.

1. The teacher told the student that a person should always be loyal.

2. People with perseverance will be successful in life.

3. I bought a new pen at the drugstore across the street.

4. The man said to the policeman that he had not seen the accident.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. The teacher told the student that a person should always be loyal.

2. People with perseverance will be successful in life.

3. I bought a new pen at the drugstore across the street.

4. The man said to the policeman that he had not seen the accident.


For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html.

Saturday, September 5, 2020

Quiz for Lessons 1-15 - Parts of Speech - Verbs

View quiz on Daily Grammar

Instructions: Answer each question true or false.

1. Verbs never change form.

2. A verb is never just one word.

3. Verb phrases keep a definite order.

4. There are twenty-three helping verbs.

5. Helping verbs cannot be the main verb.

6. Helping verbs can be action verbs.

7. Verb phrases can have three helping verbs.

8, Verbs can be in contracted form.

9. State of being verbs show action.

10. Verbs are the most important words in a sentence.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. False (Lesson 13)

2. False (Lesson 4)

3. True (Lesson 12)

4. True (Lesson 4)

5. False (Lesson 5)

6. True (Lesson 5)

7. True (Lesson 4)

8. True (Lesson 8)

9. False (Lesson 1)

10. True (Lesson 1)


For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html.

Friday, September 4, 2020

Lesson 15 - Parts of Speech - Verbs

View lesson on Daily Grammar

It's time to review what we have learned. Remember that verbs either show action or state of being. Using helping verbs, we make verb phrases. Verb phrases may be separated by other words. Verb phrases follow a definite order and change form.

Instructions: Find the verb phrases and tell what kind of verbs they are.

1. I can understand your concern.

2. Is Mrs. Johanson going with you?

3. The rooms cannot be held any longer.

4. I haven't seen him for an hour.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. I can understand your concern.
     - action verbs

2. Is Mrs. Johanson going with you?
     - action verbs

3. The rooms cannot be held any longer.
     - action verbs

4. I haven't seen him for an hour.
     - action verbs


For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html.

Thursday, September 3, 2020

Lesson 14 - Parts of Speech - Verbs

View lesson on Daily Grammar

Instructions:  Find the verb phrases in each sentence. Then pick out the helping verbs used in the verb phrases.

1. He should have tried again.

2. The dog had suddenly come into the yard.

3. Has anyone taken out the trash?

4. Could they have been pointing at our car?

5. She's hoping for a call from her sister.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. He should have tried again.
      should have  -  helping verbs

2. The dog had suddenly come into the yard.
      had  -  helping verb

3. Has anyone taken out the trash?
      has  -  helping verb

4. Could they have been pointing at our car?
      could have been  -  helping verbs

5. She's hoping for a call from her sister.
      's (is)  -  helping verb


For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html.

Wednesday, September 2, 2020

Lesson 13 - Parts of Speech - Verbs

 View lesson on Daily Grammar

We can change the form of a verb. (These changes in form are used in conjugations. We will talk about conjugations in later lessons.) For example, a verb can have an s added to it as in eat, eats or run, runs. Other changes could be eating, ate, or eaten for the verb eat. Run could be changed to running, or ran. Irregular verbs which we will cover later have several confusing changes.

Instructions: Find the verb or verb phrases in these sentences. Take note of the different verb forms for come and sent.

1. I am coming in the morning.

2. I came as soon as possible.

3. She comes by every day.

4. Send me the package in the mail.

5. The new part was sent to me.

6. I am sending Jeff with the neighbors.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. I am coming in the morning.

2. I came as soon as possible.

3. She comes by every day.

4. Send me the package in the mail.

5. The new part was sent to me.

6. I am sending Jeff with the neighbors.


For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html.

Tuesday, September 1, 2020

Lesson 12 - Parts of Speech - Verbs

View lesson on  Daily Grammar

Verb phrases with two or more helping verbs always keep a definite order.  Most helping verbs can combine with other helping verbs but will not combine with all of them.

     Examples of good combinations: 
        has been said 
        will be said
        could have been said
        may have said 
        had been said

Instructions: Arrange the following helping verbs with the word in parentheses into a verb phrase. One of the helping verbs will not combine and must be left out.

     Example:
     was, have, may (gone) = may have gone
      - "was" will not combine in this group

1. am, will, being (fired)

2. been, could, does, have (learning)

3. might, do, have, been (sleeping)

4. must, were, be (discovered)

5. be, has, should (sold)


--For answers scroll down.












Answers:

1. am being fired

2. could have been learning

3. might have been sleeping

4. must be discovered

5. should be sold


For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html.

Monday, August 31, 2020

Lesson 11 - Parts of Speech - Verbs

View lesson on Daily Grammar

Not and its contracted form n't are never part of the verb phrase.

Instructions: Pick out the verb phrases in these sentences.

1. The game will not be finished for another hour.

2. The horse shouldn't have been worked so much.

3. Wouldn't you give me another chance?


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. The game will not be finished for another hour.

2. The horse shouldn't have been worked so much.

3. Wouldn't you give me another chance?

Hint: Verb phrases can have one, two, or three helping verbs in them.

Saturday, August 29, 2020

Quiz for Lessons 6-10 - Parts of Speech - Verbs

View quiz on Daily Grammar

Instructions: List the verb phrases in the following sentences.

1. My wife is reading in the hammock under the tree.

2. The message can't be altered.

3. Somewhere a party is being planned.

4. Shouldn't I be a clown for Halloween?

5. I've run out of time.

6. Write down as many of the twenty-three helping verbs as you can.


Extra Credit:

1. What are the 5 helping verbs that can be used alone as state of being verbs?

2. What are the 6 helping verbs that always show action when used alone?

3. What are the 3 helping verbs that can show action or state of being?

4. Name the remaining helping verbs that cannot be used alone. Hint: Group 5 & 6.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. My wife is reading in the hammock under the tree.

2. The message can't be altered.

3. Somewhere a party is being planned.

4. Shouldn't I be a clown for Halloween?

5. I've (have) run out of time.

6. is, am, are, was, were
    be, being, been
    has, have, had
    do, does, did
    shall, will, should, would
    may, might, must, can, could

Extra Credit Answers:

1. is, am, are, was, and were

2. has, have, had, do, does, and did

3. be, being, and been

4. shall, will, should, would, may, might, must, can, and could


All of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html.

Friday, August 28, 2020

Lesson 10 - Parts of Speech - Verbs

View lesson on Daily Grammar 

Sometimes verb phrases are separated by words called adverbs (we will learn more about adverbs in later lessons).  Adverbs are often used with verbs; however, they are not considered part of the verb phrase.

Instructions: Find the verb phrases in the following sentences.  Are the verbs action verbs or state of being verbs?

1. You have not helped your father today.

2. I will soon be home.

3. The child had suddenly choked on the food. 


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. You have not helped your father today.
    - action verbs

2. I will soon be home.
    - state of being verbs

3. The child had suddenly choked on the food. 
    - action verbs

All of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html

Thursday, August 27, 2020

Lesson 9 - Parts of Speech - Verbs

View lesson on Daily Grammar

In sentences that are questions, the verb phrase is often separated by another word.

Instructions: Find the verb phrases in these sentences. Be sure to watch for another word separating the helping verb from the main verb.

1. Have you been driving long?

2. Where was the car parked?

3. Can I be of assistance?


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. Have you been driving long?
    - action verbs

2. Where was the car parked?
    - action verbs

3. Can I be of assistance?
    - linking verbs

Note: The words separating the verb phrases are nouns and pronouns. This is very common in sentences that are questions.



All of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html.