Saturday, May 6, 2017

Quiz for Lessons 176 - 180 - Parts of the Sentence - Prepositional Phrases

A prepositional phrase may be used as an adjective telling which or what kind and modifying a noun or pronoun. An adjective prepositional phrase will come right after the noun or pronoun that it modifies. If there are two adjective phrases together, one will follow the other. A prepositional phrase may be used as an adverb telling how, when, where, how much, and why and modifying the verb and sometimes an adjective. Adverb prepositional phrases can come anywhere in the sentence and can be moved within the sentence without changing the meaning. Only adjective prepositional phrases modify the object of the preposition in another prepositional phrase.

Instructions: Pick out the prepositional phrases in these sentences and tell what they modify.

1. A tree with sharp thorns grew beside the wall.

2. The airplane soared above the people on the field.

3. My uncle, the owner of the ranch, rode his horse past the house.

4. We followed the cougar by its tracks in the snow.

5. The bear tumbled over the fence and into some bushes.

6. Tons of wreckage were left after the tornado.

7. The highway wound over a hill and through a beautiful valley.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. with sharp thorns modifies "tree"/ beside the wall modifies "grew"

2. above the people modifies "soared"/ on the field modifies "people"

3. of the ranch modifies "owner"/ past the house modifies "rode"

4. by its tracks modifies "followed"/ in the snow modifies either "tracks" (telling which tracks) or "followed" (telling where we followed it)

5. over the fence / into some bushes modify "tumbled"

6. of wreckage modifies "tons"/ after the tornado modifies "were left"

7. over a hill / through a beautiful valley modify "wound"

For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html. Our lessons are also available to purchase in an eBook and a Workbook format.

Friday, May 5, 2017

Lesson 180 - Parts of the Sentence - Prepositional Phrases

A preposition is a word that begins a prepositional phrase and shows the relationship between its object and another word in the sentence. A preposition must always have an object. A prepositional phrase starts with a preposition, ends with an object, and may have modifiers between the preposition and object of the preposition.

Here is a list of common words that can be used as prepositions: about, above, across, after, against, along, among, around, at, before, behind, below, beneath, beside, besides, between, beyond, but (when it means except), by, concerning, down, during, except, for, from, in, inside, into, like, near, of, off, on, out, outside, over, past, since, through, to, toward, under, until, up, upon, with, within, and without.

These words can be used as other parts of speech. What part of speech it is depends on how it is used in that sentence. Many of the common words used as prepositions can be used as adverbs. They are prepositions if they have an object to complete them. To decide which it is, say the preposition followed by whom or what. If a noun or a pronoun answers the question, the word is a preposition.

Example: The boy stood up and ran down the street. Up what? There is no object; therefore up is not a preposition. Down what? Street answers the question; therefore, down is a preposition. Down the street is the prepositional phrase starting with the preposition down and ending with the object street with a modifier the in between.

A prepositional phrase may be used as an adjective telling which or what kind and modifying a noun or pronoun. An adjective prepositional phrase will come right after the noun or pronoun that it modifies. If there are two adjective phrases together, one will follow the other. A prepositional phrase may be used as an adverb telling how, when, where, how much, and why and modifying the verb and sometimes an adjective. Adverb prepositional phrases can come anywhere in the sentence and can be moved within the sentence without changing the meaning. Only adjective prepositional phrases modify the object of the preposition in another prepositional phrase.

Instructions: Pick out the prepositional phrases in these sentences and tell what they modify.

1. A number of javalinas appeared at the edge of the forest.

2. In the cage we saw a huge jaguar from the jungles of Brazil.

3. Everyone in the class finished the test at the same time.

4. The children were awakened by a sudden clap of loud thunder.

5. You can go to the Jazz game with us.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. of javalinas modifies the subject "number"/ at the edge modifies the verb "appeared"/ of the forest modifies the object of the preposition "edge"

2. in on cage modifies the verb "saw"/ from the jungles modifies the direct object "jaguar"/ of Brazil modifies the object of the preposition "jungles"

3. in the class modifies the subject "everyone"/ at the same time modifies the verb "finished"

4. by a sudden clap modifies the verb "were awakened"/ of loud thunder modifies the object of the preposition "clap"

5. to the Jazz game/ with us modify the verb "can go"

For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html. Our lessons are also available to purchase in an eBook and a Workbook format.

Thursday, May 4, 2017

Lesson 179 - Parts of the Sentence - Prepositional Phrases

A preposition is a word that begins a prepositional phrase and shows the relationship between its object and another word in the sentence. A preposition must always have an object. A prepositional phrase starts with a preposition, ends with an object, and may have modifiers between the preposition and object of the preposition.

Here is a list of common words that can be used as prepositions: about, above, across, after, against, along, among, around, at, before, behind, below, beneath, beside, besides, between, beyond, but (when it means except), by, concerning, down, during, except, for, from, in, inside, into, like, near, of, off, on, out, outside, over, past, since, through, to, toward, under, until, up, upon, with, within, and without.

These words can be used as other parts of speech. What part of speech it is depends on how it is used in that sentence. Many of the common words used as prepositions can be used as adverbs. They are prepositions if they have an object to complete them. To decide which it is, say the preposition followed by whom or what. If a noun or a pronoun answers the question, the word is a preposition.

Example: The boy stood up and ran down the street. Up what? There is no object; therefore up is not a preposition. Down what? Street answers the question; therefore, down is a preposition. Down the street is the prepositional phrase starting with the preposition down and ending with the object street with a modifier the in between.

A prepositional phrase may be used as an adverb telling how, when, where, how much, and why and modifying the verb and sometimes an adjective. Adverb prepositional phrases can come anywhere in the sentence and can be moved within the sentence without changing the meaning. Only adjective prepositional phrases modify the object of the preposition in another prepositional phrase.

Instructions: Pick out the adverb prepositional phrases in these sentences and tell what they modify.

1. We are proud of the Jazz team and of their record.

2. The dark shadows stretched across the road and the park.

3. On the hill stands an old castle.

4. The employee came for his money.

5. Bill walked down the trail during the rain storm.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. of the Jazz team / of their record modify the predicate adjective "proud"

2. across the road and the park modifies the verb "stretched"

3. on the hill modifies the verb "stands"

4. for his money modifies the verb "came"

5. down the trail / during the rain storm modify the verb "walked"

For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html. Our lessons are also available to purchase in an eBook and a Workbook format.

Wednesday, May 3, 2017

Lesson 178 - Parts of the Sentence - Prepositional Phrases

A preposition is a word that begins a prepositional phrase and shows the relationship between its object and another word in the sentence. A preposition must always have an object. A prepositional phrase starts with a preposition, ends with an object, and may have modifiers between the preposition and object of the preposition.

Here is a list of common words that can be used as prepositions: about, above, across, after, against, along, among, around, at, before, behind, below, beneath, beside, besides, between, beyond, but (when it means except), by, concerning, down, during, except, for, from, in, inside, into, like, near, of, off, on, out, outside, over, past, since, through, to, toward, under, until, up, upon, with, within, and without.

These words can be used as other parts of speech. What part of speech it is depends on how it is used in that sentence. Many of the common words used as prepositions can be used as adverbs. They are prepositions if they have an object to complete them. To decide which it is, say the preposition followed by whom or what. If a noun or a pronoun answers the question, the word is a preposition.

Example: The boy stood up and ran down the street. Up what? There is no object; therefore up is not a preposition. Down what? Street answers the question; therefore, down is a preposition. Down the street is the prepositional phrase starting with the preposition down and ending with the object street with a modifier the in between.

A prepositional phrase may be used as an adverb telling how, when, where, how much, and why and modifying the verb and sometimes an adjective. Adverb prepositional phrases can come anywhere in the sentence and can be moved within the sentence without changing the meaning. Only adjective prepositional phrases modify the object of the preposition in another prepositional phrase.

Instructions: Pick out the adverb prepositional phrases in these sentences and tell what they modify.

1. The boys jumped quickly over the wall.

2. The old dog is troublesome in many ways.

3. The pirate map was hidden underneath a big rock.

4. The family was waiting for us at the rest stop.

5. In the morning I will come for the plans.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. over the wall modifies the verb "jumped"

2. in many ways modifies the predicate adjective "troublesome"

3. underneath a big rock modifies the verb "was hidden"

4. for us/ at the rest stop modify the verb "was waiting"

5. in the morning/ for the plans modify the verb "will come"

For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html. Our lessons are also available to purchase in an eBook and a Workbook format.

Tuesday, May 2, 2017

Lesson 177 - Parts of the Sentence - Prepositional Phrases

A preposition is a word that begins a prepositional phrase and shows the relationship between its object and another word in the sentence. A preposition must always have an object. A prepositional phrase starts with a preposition, ends with an object, and may have modifiers between the preposition and object of the preposition.

Here is a list of common words that can be used as prepositions: about, above, across, after, against, along, among, around, at, before, behind, below, beneath, beside, besides, between, beyond, but (when it means except), by, concerning, down, during, except, for, from, in, inside, into, like, near, of, off, on, out, outside, over, past, since, through, to, toward, under, until, up, upon, with, within, and without.

These words can be used as other parts of speech. What part of speech it is depends on how it is used in that sentence. Many of the common words used as prepositions can be used as adverbs. They are prepositions if they have an object to complete them. To decide which it is, say the preposition followed by whom or what. If a noun or a pronoun answers the question, the word is a preposition.

Example: The boy stood up and ran down the street. Up what? There is no object; therefore up is not a preposition. Down what? Street answers the question; therefore, down is a preposition. Down the street is the prepositional phrase starting with the preposition down and ending with the object street with a modifier the in between.

A prepositional phrase may be used as an adjective telling which or what kind and modifying a noun or pronoun. An adjective prepositional phrase will come right after the noun or pronoun that it modifies. If there are two adjective prepositional phrases together, one will follow the other. Only adjective prepositional phrases modify the object of the preposition in another prepositional phrase.

Instructions: Pick out the adjective prepositional phrases in these sentences and tell what they modify.

1. The book on the table in the English classroom is Barbara's book.

2. The girl in the neighboring house plays the flute every night.

3. Large blocks of the hardest granite formed the walls of the new building.

4. The roads of ancient Rome connected the cities of the empire.

5. I know that man in the gray suit and the suede shoes.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. on the table modifies "book"/ in the English classroom modifies "table"

2. in the neighboring house modifies "girl"

3. of the hardest granite modifies "blocks"/ of the new building modifies "walls"

4. of ancient Rome modifies "roads"/ of the empire modifies "cities"

5. in the gray suit and the suede shoes modifies "man"

For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html. Our lessons are also available to purchase in an eBook and a Workbook format.

Monday, May 1, 2017

Lesson 176 - Parts of the Sentence - Prepositional Phrases

A preposition is a word that begins a prepositional phrase and shows the relationship between its object and another word in the sentence. A preposition must always have an object. A prepositional phrase starts with a preposition, ends with an object, and may have modifiers between the preposition and object of the preposition.

Here is a list of common words that can be used as prepositions: about, above, across, after, against, along, among, around, at, before, behind, below, beneath, beside, besides, between, beyond, but (when it means except), by, concerning, down, during, except, for, from, in, inside, into, like, near, of, off, on, out, outside, over, past, since, through, to, toward, under, until, up, upon, with, within, and without.

These words can be used as other parts of speech. What part of speech it is depends on how it is used in that sentence. Many of the common words used as prepositions can be used as adverbs. They are prepositions if they have an object to complete them. To decide which it is, say the preposition followed by whom or what. If a noun or a pronoun answers the question, the word is a preposition.

Example: The boy stood up and ran down the street. Up what? There is no object; therefore up is not a preposition. Down what? Street answers the question; therefore, down is a preposition. Down the street is the prepositional phrase starting with the preposition down and ending with the object street with a modifier the in between.

A prepositional phrase may be used as an adjective telling which or what kind and modifying a noun or pronoun. An adjective prepositional phrase will come right after the noun or pronoun that it modifies. If there are two adjective prepositional phrases together, one will follow the other. Only adjective prepositional phrases modify the object of the preposition in another prepositional phrase.

Instructions: Pick out the adjective prepositional phrases in these sentences and tell what they modify.

1. Do you remember the title of the new book about morals?

2. Our work on the planning commission covers all kinds of ideas and concepts.

3. Those immense houses on the west side of town were built recently.

4. The man in the next room is the mayor.

5. Few of the citizens had ever seen that plan.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. of the new book modifies "title"/ about morals modifies "book"

2. on the planning commission modifies "work"/ of ideas and concepts modifies "kinds"

3. on the west side modifies "houses"/ of town modifies "side"

4. in the next room modifies "man"

5. of the citizens modifies "few"

For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html. Our lessons are also available to purchase in an eBook and a Workbook format.

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