Friday, October 24, 2014

Lesson 35 - Parts of Speech - Adjectives

Adjectives are not limited in how many can be used with a noun to modify it as in the big black frightening curly bear. These adjectives follow an order pattern when two or more are used together. There is no written rule but just common usage.

Examples: the second three days, both his friends. You would not say three second the days or his both friends.

Instructions: Because many words can be both pronouns and adjectives depending on how they are used in a sentence, decide if the italicized words are pronouns or adjectives in the following sentences. Remember that pronouns stand alone, but adjectives are used to modify nouns.

1. Do either of you have any of this material. Any amount would help.

2. Each girl did her chores, and their mother gave each a hug.

3. This is our answer, and no one disagrees.

4. Both have many chances to play, but neither one is better.

5. What is your name because neither of us knows it?


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. Either and the first any are pronouns, this and the second any are adjectives.

2. The first each and their are adjectives, and the second each is a pronoun.

3. This and no one are pronouns.

4. Both and one are pronouns, and many and neither are adjectives.

5. What and neither are pronouns, and your is an adjective.

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Thursday, October 23, 2014

Lesson 34 - Parts of Speech - Adjectives

Verb forms can also be used as adjectives. They are called participial adjectives.

Examples: the lost mine, the howling wolf.

Instructions: Pick out the adjectives in these sentences.

1. The soaking rain caused much damage.

2. The broken dish cut the crying girl.

3. A great work was done by the person with a giving spirit.

4. The laughing hyena was sleeping in its cage.

5. The eager student found the torn book.


--For answers scroll down.












Answers:

1. The, soaking, much

2. The, broken, the, crying

3. A, great, the, a, giving

4. The, laughing, its

5. The, eager, the, torn

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Wednesday, October 22, 2014

Lesson 33 - Parts of Speech - Adjectives

Proper nouns, possessives and modifiers made from them, and common nouns can be adjectives. Examples: July storms, winter weather, Jim's boat, boy's bed.

Some authorities call nouns used to described another noun noun adjuncts. They tell us whose or what kind.

Instructions: Find the adjectives in these sentences..

1. Dan's new hat blew down the man's stairway.

2. Stormy spring weather can cause many flash floods.

3. Pam's new suitcase was ready for the Canadian trip.

4. December winds can make a dangerous Christmas trip.

5. The student's hope was the teacher's happiness.


--For answers scroll down.












Answers:

1. Dan's, new, the, man's

2. Stormy, spring, many, flash

3. Pam's, new, the, Canadian

4. December, a, dangerous, Christmas

5. The, student's, the, teacher's

For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html. Our lessons are also available to purchase in an eBook, a FlipBook, and a Workbook format.

Tuesday, October 21, 2014

Lesson 32 - Parts of Speech - Adjectives

Other pronouns can also be used as adjectives, but they are not always adjectives as the seven mentioned in Lesson 31. Demonstrative pronouns, this, that, these, those; interrogative pronouns, whose, which, what; and indefinite pronouns, another, any, both, each, either, many, neither, one, other, some; when used with a noun become adjectives. Cardinal and ordinal numbers can be adjectives. Examples: ten students (cardinal), the tenth student (ordinal). Pronouns used as adjectives are called pronominal adjectives.

Instructions: List the adjectives in these sentences.

1, Whose car is that red one in the driveway?

2. Those drapes go well with this brown carpet.

3. The two men were wondering what signal had brought many people to their rescue.

4. The third person entering the city park won another prize.

5. That tie is a good one for this suit.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. Whose, that, red, the

2. Those, this, brown

3. The, two, what, many, their

4. The, third, the, city, another

5. That, a, good, this

For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html. Our lessons are also available to purchase in an eBook, a FlipBook, and a Workbook format.

Monday, October 13, 2014

Lesson 31 - Parts of Speech - Adjectives

Adjectives, another part of speech, give us a great deal of terminology. I will share it with you, but all that is really important is that adjectives modify or affect the meaning of nouns and pronouns and tell us which, whose, what kind, and how many about the nouns or pronouns they modify. They generally come before the noun or pronoun they modify, but there are exceptions to that rule. How and why they are different will be explained in later lessons. They still tell us which, whose, what kind, and how many.

There are seven (7) words in the English language that are always adjectives. They are the articles a, an, and the and the possessives my, our, your, and their. (The possessives are from the possessive pronoun list but are always used with nouns as adjectives.) Being only seven in number, one should memorize them so they are immediately recognized as adjectives.

Examples: The neighbor girl likes chocolate ice cream. Mr. Johanson is tall, dark and handsome.

Some authorities like to distinguish between what they call true adjectives and determiners, but both still just tell which, whose, what kind, and how many. Those words are the key to adjectives and should be memorized to make adjectives easy.

Instructions: Pick out the adjectives in the following sentences.

1. The heavy, red dress of Queen Elizabeth weighed over fifty pounds.

2. My sister chose two shirts for my graduation present.

3. That small Mexican restaurant in the next block serves fresh meals.

4. The little black dog barked at the well-dressed stranger.

5. An old wood fence had caught several discarded candy wrappers.

--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. The, heavy, red, fifty.

2. My, two, my, graduation

3. That, small, Mexican, the, next, fresh

4. The, little, black, the, well-dressed

5. An, old, wood, several, discarded, candy

For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html. Our lessons are also available to purchase in an eBook, a FlipBook, and a Workbook format.

Saturday, October 11, 2014

Quiz for Lessons 21-30 - Parts of Speech - Pronouns

Instructions: Find each pronoun. Tell if it is personal, relative, demonstrative, indefinite, or interrogative. List the antecedent if there is one. For each personal pronoun tell if it is possessive, intensive, or reflexive.

1. He himself had helped my mother do something.

2. Which is the right room for this?

3. These are mine. Whose are these?

4. This is the book that I would recommend to you.

5. Everyone has talents. Some have many. No one has none.

6. He found himself lost in his dream.

7. I myself heard him blame himself in front of everybody.

8. Neither of them has anyone who will help us.

9. Who would have guessed that that was wrong?

--For answers scroll down.












Answers:

1. he - personal, himself - personal, intensive, my - personal, possessive. He is the antecedent for himself. (something is a noun)

2. Which - interrogative, this - demonstrative

3. These - demonstrative, mine - personal, possessive, Whose - interrogative, these - demonstrative

4. this - demonstrative, that - relative, I - personal, you - personal

5. everyone, some, many, no one, none - all are indefinite

6. he - personal, himself - personal, reflexive, his - personal. He is the antecedent for himself and his.

7. I - personal, myself - personal, intensive, him - personal, himself - personal, reflexive, everybody - indefinite. I is the antecedent for myself, and him is the antecedent for himself.

8. neither - indefinite, them - personal, anyone - indefinite, who - relative, us - personal

9. who - interrogative, that - relative, that - demonstrative

For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html. Our lessons are also available to purchase in an eBook, a FlipBook, and a Workbook format.

Friday, October 10, 2014

Lesson 30 - Parts of Speech - Pronouns

This lesson is a review of the five kinds of pronouns.

Instructions: Find each pronoun and tell what kind it is. It is either personal, relative, demonstrative, indefinite, or interrogative.

1. From whom did you get that?

2. Neither of my brothers would read me the story.

3. You need someone who will be kind to others.

4. What does this have to do with me?

5. I liked the play that you hated.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. whom - interrogative, you - personal, that - demonstrative

2. neither - indefinite, my - personal, me - personal

3. you - personal, someone - indefinite, who - relative, others - indefinite

4. what - interrogative, this - demonstrative, me - personal

5. I - personal, that - relative, you - personal

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Thursday, October 9, 2014

Lesson 29 - Parts of Speech - Pronouns

Interrogative pronouns ask questions. Who, whom, whose, which, and what are interrogative pronouns.

Instructions: Find the interrogative pronouns in these sentences.

1. What is that?

2. Who is going with me?

3. Which is the right answer?

4. Whose was right?

5. To whom did you want to speak?


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. what

2. who

3. which

4. whose

5. whom

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Wednesday, October 8, 2014

Lesson 28 - Parts of Speech - Pronouns

Indefinite pronouns are pronouns that do not point out specifically. They point out generally. They include such words as another, any, anybody, anyone, anything, both, each, either, everybody, everyone, everything, many, neither, nobody, none, no one, one, other, others, some, somebody, and someone.

Instructions: Find the indefinite pronouns in the following sentences.

1. Everybody loves someone sometime.

2. Both of the students should hand in everything they have completed.

3. I didn't see anyone I knew.

4. If no one helps others, nothing gets done.

5. Somebody said that one should touch neither of them.


--For answers scroll down.












Answers:

1. everybody, someone

2. both, everything

3. anyone

4. no one, others

5. somebody, one, neither

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Tuesday, October 7, 2014

Lesson 27 - Parts of Speech - Pronouns

Demonstrative pronouns are pronouns that point out. They are this, that, these, and those. That is my hat. I like these not those.

Instructions: Find the demonstrative pronouns in these sentences.

1. That is a great idea.

2. I will take those.

3. How much money do you want for this?

4. These are the shoes I want.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. that

2. those

3. this

4. these

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Monday, October 6, 2014

Lesson 26 - Parts of Speech - Pronouns

Relative pronouns join dependent clauses to independent clauses. They are who, whose, whom, which, and that. For example, He found his money that he had lost. That joins the two clauses together into one sentence. Clauses will be taught in detail later.

Instructions: Find the relative pronouns in the sentences, and see how many other pronouns you can find as a bonus.

1. I want the house, which is brick.

2. Jack ordered the meal that we picked up.

3. Freddie is the girl who won the contest.

4. Jon is a man on whom I can rely.

5. The student whose answer was wrong turned bright red.


 --For answers scroll down.












Answers:

1. Which is the relative pronoun, and I is also a pronoun.

2. That is the relative pronoun, and we is also a pronoun.

3. Who is the relative pronoun.

4. Whom is the relative pronoun, and I is also a pronoun.

5. Whose is the relative pronoun.

For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html. Our lessons are also available to purchase in an eBook, a FlipBook, and a Workbook format.

Saturday, October 4, 2014

Quiz for Lessons 21-25 - Parts of Speech - Pronouns

Instructions: Find the personal pronouns. Tell if they are intensive, reflexive, or possessive, and if they have an antecedent, name it.

1. I want you yourself to come tomorrow.

2. The decision itself is yours to make.

3. She gave herself up to the police.

4. My brother gave me his pet snake.

5. You can tie your shoe by yourself.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. I, you and yourself are pronouns. Yourself is intensive and you is its antecedent.

2. Itself and yours are pronouns. Itself is intensive, and yours is possessive.  Decision is the antecedent for itself.

3. She and herself are pronouns. Herself is reflexive and has she as the antecedent.

4. My, me and his are pronouns. My and his are possessives, and brother is the antecedent of his.

5. You, your and yourself are pronouns. Yourself is a reflexive pronoun, and you is the antecedent for your and yourself. Your is possessive.

For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html. Our lessons are also available to purchase in an eBook, a FlipBook, and a Workbook format.

Friday, October 3, 2014

Lesson 25 - Parts of Speech - Pronouns

The personal pronouns myself, yourself, yourselves, himself, herself, itself, ourselves, and themselves can also be used as intensive pronouns. An example would be Carl himself won the race.

Instructions: Find the intensive pronouns in these sentences.

1. We ourselves went to the movie.

2. The man himself wrestled the alligator.

3. Jeanne herself gave us the gift.

4. They themselves had played until dark.


--For answers scroll down.












Answers:

1. ourselves

2. himself

3. herself

4. themselves

For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html. Our lessons are also available to purchase in an eBook, a FlipBook, and a Workbook format.

Thursday, October 2, 2014

Lesson 24 - Parts of Speech - Pronouns

The personal pronouns myself, yourself, yourselves, himself, herself, itself, ourselves, and themselves are compound personal pronouns combining the personal pronoun with self or selves. They are used as reflexive pronouns. Carl hurt himself is an example of a reflexive pronoun.

Instructions: Find the reflexive pronouns in these sentences.

1. I should understand myself better.

2. Ann bought herself two new hamsters.

3. They can't help themselves.

4. The boy cut himself on the broken glass.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. myself

2. herself

3. themselves

4. himself 

For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html. Our lessons are also available to purchase in an eBook, a FlipBook, and a Workbook format.

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