Tuesday, March 26, 2019

Lesson 157 - Parts of the Sentence - Review

View lesson on Daily Grammar

Instructions: Using all the knowledge learned in the previous lessons, find the verb, subjects, predicate nominatives, direct objects, appositives, nouns of address, and adjectives in the following sentences.

1. The dog became noisy.

2. Are many women famous athletes?

3. Both girls have been enjoying their vacation, a trip to Disneyland.

4. These black shoes are my favorite ones.

5. Ann, did you see Chris's new camera?


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. became = verb; dog = subject; noisy = predicate adjective; the = adjective

2. are = verb; women = subject; athletes = predicate nominative; many, famous = adjectives

3. have been enjoying = verb; girls = subject; vacation = direct object; trip = appositive; both, their, a = adjectives

4. are = verb; shoes = subject; ones = predicate nominative; these, black, my, favorite = adjectives

5. did see = verb; you = subject; camera = direct object; Ann = noun of address; Chris's, new = adjectives


For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html.

Monday, March 25, 2019

Lesson 156 - Parts of the Sentence - Review

View lesson on Daily Grammar

Instructions: Using all the knowledge learned in the previous lessons, find the verb, subjects, predicate nominatives, direct objects, appositives, nouns of address, and adjectives in the following sentences.

1. The two little boys wore their new suits.

2. Audrey, your new house has many beautiful features.

3. The howling wind frightened the small children.

4. That idea is brilliant, John.

5. George Washington, our first President, was also a great general.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. wore = verb; boys = subject; suits = direct object; the, two, little, their, new = adjectives

2. has = verb; house = subject; features = direct object; Audrey = noun of address; your, new, many, beautiful = adjectives

3. frightened = verb; wind = subject; children = direct object; the, howling, the, small = adjectives

4. is = verb; idea = subject; John = noun of address; brilliant = predicate adjective; that = adjective

5. was = verb; George Washington = subject; general = predicate nominative; President = appositive; our, first, a, great = adjectives


For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html.

Saturday, March 23, 2019

Quiz for Lessons 151 - 155 - Parts of the Sentence - Adjectives

View quiz on Daily Grammar

Instructions: Find all the adjectives in these sentences, tell what they modify, and what they tell.

1. Grandpa's low growl was a quick warning to us.

2. The largest spaceship in the world stood ready for launch.

3. His lost vision was still not clear.

4. Many young people feel uneasy before a crowd.

5. Pink and blue flowers bloomed in the neighbor's garden.

6. Several gray clouds blocked the radiant sunlight.

7. There were no visible signs of activity at the old mill.

8. Five little speckled eggs were seen in the bird's nest.

9. Mother planted those yellow and white irises.

10. Soft, cool breezes blew off the beautiful silver lake.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. Grandpa's/whose, low/what kind modify growl, a/which, quick/what kind modify warning

2. the/which, largest/what kind modify spaceship, the/which modifies world

3. his/whose, lost/what kind modify vision, clear/what kind (predicate adjective) modifies vision

4. many/how many, young/what kind modify people, uneasy/what kind (pred. adj.) modifies people, a/which modifies crowd

5. pink/what kind, blue/what kind modify flowers, the/which, neighbor's/whose modify garden

6. several/how many, gray/what kind modify clouds, the/which, radiant/what kind modify sunlight

7. no/how many, visible/what kind modify signs, the/which, old/what kind modify mill

8. five/how many, little/what kind, speckled/what kind modify eggs, the/which, bird's/whose modify nest

9. those/which, yellow/what kind, white/what kind modify irises

10. soft/what kind, cool/what kind modify breezes, the/which, beautiful/what kind, silver/what kind modify lake



For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html.

Friday, March 22, 2019

Lesson 155 - Parts of the Sentence - Adjectives

View lesson on Daily Grammar

Adjectives modify or affect the meaning of nouns and pronouns and tell us which, whose, what kind, and how many about the nouns or pronouns they modify. They come before the noun or pronoun they modify except for the predicate adjective which comes after a linking verb and modifies the subject.

There are seven (7) words in the English language that are always adjectives. They are the articles a, an, and the and the possessives my, our, your, and their. (The possessives are from the possessive pronoun list but are always used with nouns as adjectives.) One should memorize them so they are immediately recognized as adjectives.

Example of adjectives: The big brown bear grabbed the scared small man. The, big and brown modify the subject bear and the, scared and small modify the direct object man. Examples of a predicate adjective: The big bear is brown. The brown bear was big. Brown and big come after the linking verbs is and was and modify the subject bear.

Instructions: Find the predicate adjectives in these sentences, tell what they modify, and what they tell us.

1. The performance was hilarious.

2. The two girls were tired and exhausted.

3. My father is old but strong.

4. This fish tastes too salty.

5. Has she been sick recently?


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. hilarious modifies the subject performance and tells what kind

2. tired/exhausted modify the subject girls and tell what kind

3. old/strong modify the subject father and tell what kind

4. salty modifies the subject fish and tells what kind

5. sick modifies the subject she and tells what kind



For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html.

Thursday, March 21, 2019

Lesson 154 - Parts of the Sentence - Adjectives

View lesson on Daily Grammar

Adjectives modify or affect the meaning of nouns and pronouns and tell us which, whose, what kind, and how many about the nouns or pronouns they modify. They come before the noun or pronoun they modify except for the predicate adjective which comes after a linking verb and modifies the subject.

There are seven (7) words in the English language that are always adjectives. They are the articles a, an, and the and the possessives my, our, your, and their. (The possessives are from the possessive pronoun list but are always used with nouns as adjectives.) One should memorize them so they are immediately recognized as adjectives.

Example of adjectives: The big brown bear grabbed the scared small man. The, big and brown modify the subject bear and the, scared and small modify the direct object man. Examples of a predicate adjective: The big bear is brown. The brown bear was big. Brown and big come after the linking verbs is and was and modify the subject bear.

Adjectives that point out how many are indefinite pronouns like many, several, both, and numbers.

Instructions: Find the adjectives that tell how many in these sentences and tell what they modify.

1. Both companies need twenty-four workers by tomorrow.

2. Several citizens protested the many cars on the two lots.

3. Seventy-six trombones led the few drummers and some tubas.

4. Three people tried out for one part in the play.

5. Each train needed another car and more passengers.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. both modifies companies, twenty-four modifies workers

2. several modifies citizens, many modifies cars, two modifies lots

3. seventy-six modifies trombones, few modifies drummers, some modifies tubas

4. three modifies people, one modifies part

5. each modifies train, another modifies car, more modifies passengers


For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html.

Wednesday, March 20, 2019

Lesson 153 - Parts of the Sentence - Adjectives

View lesson on Daily Grammar

Adjectives modify or affect the meaning of nouns and pronouns and tell us which, whose, what kind, and how many about the nouns or pronouns they modify. They come before the noun or pronoun they modify except for the predicate adjective which comes after a linking verb and modifies the subject.

There are seven (7) words in the English language that are always adjectives. They are the articles a, an, and the and the possessives my, our, your, and their. (The possessives are from the possessive pronoun list but are always used with nouns as adjectives.) One should memorize them so they are immediately recognized as adjectives.

Example of adjectives: The big brown bear grabbed the scared small man. The, big and brown modify the subject bear and the, scared and small modify the direct object man. Examples of a predicate adjective: The big bear is brown. The brown bear was big. Brown and big come after the linking verbs is and was and modify the subject bear.

Adjectives used often that point out whose are possessive pronouns my, your, our, his, her, their, its and possessive nouns like Joe's, Pete's, etc.

Instructions: Find the adjectives that tell whose in these sentences and tell what they modify.

1. Badger's bark is my signal for food.

2. The sky's clouds are our shade trees.

3. Alaina's brother is also Pam's son.

4. Their hope was our arrival in time.

5. Her hair was a spider's web.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. Badger's modifies bark, my modifies signal

2. sky's modifies clouds, our modifies trees

3. Alaina's modifies brother, Pam's modifies son

4. their modifies hope, our modifies arrival

5. her modifies hair, spider's modifies web


For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html.

Tuesday, March 19, 2019

Lesson 152 - Parts of the Sentence - Adjectives

View lesson on Daily Grammar

Adjectives modify or affect the meaning of nouns and pronouns and tell us which, whose, what kind, and how many about the nouns or pronouns they modify. They come before the noun or pronoun they modify except for the predicate adjective which comes after a linking verb and modifies the subject.

There are seven (7) words in the English language that are always adjectives. They are the articles a, an, and the and the possessives my, our, your, and their. (The possessives are from the possessive pronoun list but are always used with nouns as adjectives.) One should memorize them so they are immediately recognized as adjectives.

Example of adjectives: The big brown bear grabbed the scared small man. The, big and brown modify the subject bear and the, scared and small modify the direct object man. Examples of a predicate adjective: The big bear is brown. The brown bear was big. Brown and big come after the linking verbs is and was and modify the subject bear.

Adjectives that point out what kind are most common and too numerous to list. Big, brown, scared, and small above are examples.

Instructions: Find the adjectives that tell what kind in these sentences and tell what they modify.

1. The tall man is a professional baseball player.

2. That lovely old lady wrote realistic short plays.

3. A loud and noisy group greeted the returned missionary.

4. The small but strong man helped the cute little girl.

5. A tall slender girl won the beauty contest.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. tall modifies man, professional and baseball modify player

2. lovely and old modify lady, realistic and short modify plays

3. loud and noisy modify group, returned modifies missionary

4. small and strong modify man, cute and little modify girl

5. tall and slender modify girl, beauty modifies contest


For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html.

Monday, March 18, 2019

Lesson 151 - Parts of the Sentence - Adjectives

View lesson on Daily Grammar

Adjectives modify or affect the meaning of nouns and pronouns and tell us which, whose, what kind, and how many about the nouns or pronouns they modify. They come before the noun or pronoun they modify except for the predicate adjective which comes after a linking verb and modifies the subject.

There are seven (7) words in the English language that are always adjectives. They are the articles a, an, and the and the possessives my, our, your, and their. (The possessives are from the possessive pronoun list but are always used with nouns as adjectives.) One should memorize them so they are immediately recognized as adjectives.

Examples of adjectives: The big brown bear grabbed the scared small man. The, big and brown modify the subject bear and the, scared and small modify the direct object man. Examples of a predicate adjective: The big bear is brown. The brown bear was big. Brown and big come after the linking verbs is and was and modify the subject bear.

Adjectives that point out which include that, this, those, these, and the articles a, an, and the.

Instructions: Find the adjectives that tell which in these sentences and tell what they modify.

1. These first apples have been stepped on.

2. This money had been lost at the races.

3. That cat had those kittens.

4. A mouse can scare an elephant.

5. An answer will be found in the dictionary or a thesaurus.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. these and first modify apples

2. this modifies money, the modifies races

3. that modifies cat, those modifies kittens

4. a modifies mouse, an modifies elephant

5. an modifies answer, the modifies dictionary, a modifies thesaurus


For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html.

Saturday, March 16, 2019

Quiz for Lessons 146 -150 - Parts of the Sentence - Noun/Pronoun Review

View quiz on Daily Grammar

Instructions: Find the verbs, subjects, predicate nominatives, direct objects, appositives, and nouns of address in these sentences and tell whether the verb is transitive active (ta), transitive passive (tp), intransitive linking (il), or intransitive complete (ic).

1. Curtis, has Jay found his lost keys?

2. There on the porch stood Badger, our lost dog.

3. Sunday, Ila, will be our anniversary.

4. Those two boys, Ivan and he, argue incessantly.

5. He needs more helpers, you and me.

6. Rebecca, why haven't you practiced your music?

7. Your car has been sold today, Todd.

8. In the plowed field some corn was planted.

9. Joe, my uncle, Al Brim, is a famous skater.

10. This matter should not be decided without much thought.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. has found = verb (ta), Jay = subject, keys = direct object, Curtis = noun of address

2. stood = verb (ic), Badger = subject, dog = appositive

3. will be = verb (il), Sunday = subject, anniversary = predicate nominative, Ila = noun of address

4. argue = verb (ic), boys = subject, Ivan/he = appositives

5. needs = verb (ta), he = subject, helpers = direct object, you/me = appositives

6. have practiced = verb (ta), you = subject, music = direct object, Rebecca = noun of address

7. has been sold = verb (tp), car = subject, Todd = noun of address

8. was planted = verb (tp), corn = subject

9. is = verb (il), uncle = subject, skater = predicate nominative, Al Brim = appositive, Joe = noun of address

10. should be decided = verb (tp), matter = subject


For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html.

Friday, March 15, 2019

Lesson 150 - Parts of the Sentence - Noun/Pronoun Review

View lesson on Daily Grammar

A simple sentence is a group of words expressing a complete thought, and it must have a subject and a verb. A predicate nominative or predicate noun completes a linking verb and renames the subject. A direct object receives the action performed by the subject. An appositive is a word or group of words that identifies or renames the noun or pronoun that it follows. Nouns or nominatives of address are the persons or things to which you are speaking.

Transitive active verbs are the verbs in sentences with a direct object. Transitive passive verbs have the subject receiving the action with the doer in a prepositional phrase or omitted in the sentence. Intransitive linking are sentences with a predicate nominative or predicate adjective. Intransitive complete are all the verbs that don't fit one of the other kinds of transitive or intransitive verbs.

Instruction: Find the verbs, subjects, predicate nominatives, direct objects, appositives, and nouns of address in these sentences and tell whether the verb is transitive active (ta), transitive passive (tp), intransitive linking (il), or intransitive complete (ic).

1. Eric and I were expecting someone, you.

2. She found them in New York, Colette.

3. Do you like her best, Justin?

4. The author might have been anyone.

5. Two people, you and he, must assist us in this effort.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. were expecting = verb (ta), Eric/I = subject, someone = direct object, you = appositive

2. found = verb (ta), she = subject, them = direct object, Colette = noun of address

3. do like = verb (ta), you = subject, her = direct object, Justin = noun of address

4. might have been = verb (il), author = subject, anyone = predicate nominative

5. must assist = verb (ta), people = subject, us = direct object, you/he = appositives


For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html.

Thursday, March 14, 2019

Lesson 149 - Parts of the Sentence - Noun/Pronoun Review

View lesson on Daily Grammar

A simple sentence is a group of words expressing a complete thought, and it must have a subject and a verb. A predicate nominative or predicate noun completes a linking verb and renames the subject. A direct object receives the action performed by the subject. An appositive is a word or group of words that identifies or renames the noun or pronoun that it follows. Nouns or nominatives of address are the persons or things to which you are speaking.

Transitive active verbs are the verbs in sentences with a direct object. Transitive passive verbs have the subject receiving the action with the doer in a prepositional phrase or omitted in the sentence. Intransitive linking are sentences with a predicate nominative or predicate adjective. Intransitive complete are all the verbs that don't fit one of the other kinds of transitive or intransitive verbs.

Instructions: Find the verbs, subjects, predicate nominatives, direct objects, appositives, and nouns of address in these sentences and tell whether the verb is transitive active (ta), transitive passive (tp), intransitive linking (il), or intransitive complete (ic).

1. Neither the electrician nor his assistant had the right parts.

2. On the golf course Jim hit two trees and a sand trap.

3. For most people, life is a struggle.

4. The bus driver could hardly see the edge of the road.

5. Barbara, two groups, they and we, stayed to the end.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. had = verb (ta), electrician/assistant = subject, parts = direct object

2. hit = verb (ta), Jim = subject, trees/sand trap = direct objects

3. is = verb (il), life = subject, struggle = predicate nominative

4. could see = verb (ta), driver = subject, edge = direct object

5. stayed = verb (ic), groups = subject, they/we = appositives, Barbara = noun of address


For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html.

Wednesday, March 13, 2019

Lesson 148 - Parts of the Sentence - Noun/Pronoun Review

View lesson on Daily Grammar

A simple sentence is a group of words expressing a complete thought, and it must have a subject and a verb. A predicate nominative or predicate noun completes a linking verb and renames the subject. A direct object receives the action performed by the subject. An appositive is a word or group of words that identifies or renames the noun or pronoun that it follows. Nouns or nominatives of address are the persons or things to which you are speaking.

Transitive active verbs are the verbs in sentences with a direct object. Transitive passive verbs have the subject receiving the action with the doer in a prepositional phrase or omitted in the sentence. Intransitive linking are sentences with a predicate nominative or predicate adjective. Intransitive complete are all the verbs that don't fit one of the other kinds of transitive or intransitive verbs.

Instructions: Find the verbs, subjects, predicate nominatives, direct objects, appositives, and nouns of address in these sentences and tell whether the verb is transitive active (ta), transitive passive (tp), intransitive linking (il), or intransitive complete (ic).

1. Mr. Hoyle introduced the speaker, a famous French educator.

2. Please answer the door, Fred.

3. Phil Clintock should not have been elected President.

4. No one enters my territory without permission and lives.

5. The rehearsal has been changed, Jessica.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. introduced = verb (ta), Mr. Hoyle = subject, speaker = direct object, educator = appositive

2. answer = verb (ta), you (understood) = subject, door = direct object, Fred = noun of address

3. should have been elected = verb (il), Bill Clintock = subject, President = predicate nominative

4. enters = verb (ta) / lives = verb (ic), no one = subject, territory = direct object

5. has been changed = verb (tp), rehearsal = subject, Jessica = noun of address


For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html.

Tuesday, March 12, 2019

Lesson 147 - Parts of the Sentence - Noun/Pronoun Review

View lesson on Daily Grammar

A simple sentence is a group of words expressing a complete thought, and it must have a subject and a verb. A predicate nominative or predicate noun completes a linking verb and renames the subject. A direct object receives the action performed by the subject. An appositive is a word or group of words that identifies or renames the noun or pronoun that it follows. Nouns or nominatives of address are the persons or things to which you are speaking.

Transitive active verbs are the verbs in sentences with a direct object. Transitive passive verbs have the subject receiving the action with the doer in a prepositional phrase or omitted in the sentence. Intransitive linking are sentences with a predicate nominative or predicate adjective. Intransitive complete are all the verbs that don't fit one of the other kinds of transitive or intransitive verbs.

Instructions: Find the verbs, subjects, predicate nominatives, direct objects, appositives, and nouns of address in these sentences and tell whether the verb is transitive active (ta), transitive passive (tp), intransitive linking (il), or intransitive complete (ic).

1. He signaled Rulon, his son-in-law in New Jersey, and informed him.

2. The alarm clock had been set in the evening.

3. Our special guest for tonight is Mr. McMillan, our honored mayor.

4. There will be a surprise present for the family.

5. A box of gold coins and precious jewels was recently found in our back yard.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. signaled/informed = verbs (ta), he = subject, Rulon/him = direct objects, son-in-law = appositive

2. had been set = verb (tp), clock = subject

3. is = verb (il), guest = subject, Mr. McMillan = predicate nominative, mayor = appositive

4. will be = verb (ic), present = subject

5. was found = verb (tp), box = subject


For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html.

Monday, March 11, 2019

Lesson 146 - Parts of the Sentence - Noun/Pronoun Review

View lesson on Daily Grammar

A simple sentence is a group of words expressing a complete thought, and it must have a subject and a verb (predicate - some grammar books use the word predicate, but I will use verb). When finding the subject and the verb in a sentence, always find the verb first and then say who or what followed by the verb.

A predicate nominative or predicate noun completes a linking verb and renames the subject. Predicate nominatives complete only linking verbs. That is such verbs as the helping verbs: is, am, are, was, were, be, being, been; the sense verbs: look, taste, smell, feel, sound; and verbs like become, seem, appear, grow, continue, stay, turn.

A direct object receives the action performed by the subject. The verb is always an action verb. To find the direct object, say the subject and verb followed by whom or what. If nothing answers the question whom or what, you know that there is no direct object. The direct object must be a noun or pronoun. The predicate nominative or the direct object will never be in a prepositional phrase.

An appositive is a word or group of words that identifies or renames the noun or pronoun that it follows. It is set off by commas unless closely tied to the word that it identifies or renames. Appositives should not be confused with predicate nominatives. A verb will separate the subject from the predicate nominative. An appositive can follow any noun or pronoun including the subject, direct object or predicate nominative.

Nouns or nominatives of address are the persons or things to which you are speaking. They are set off from the rest of the sentence by a comma or commas, may have modifiers, and are not related to the rest of the sentence grammatically. You can remove them and a complete sentence remains.

Transitive active verbs are the verbs in sentences with a direct object. Transitive passive verbs have the subject receiving the action with the doer in a prepositional phrase or omitted in the sentence. The verb in the transitive passive voice always has is, am, are, was, were, be, being, or been as an auxiliary or helping verb. Intransitive verbs have no receiver of the action. They are classified as intransitive complete or intransitive linking. Intransitive linking are sentences with a predicate nominative or predicate adjective.

Instructions: Find the verbs, subjects, predicate nominatives, direct objects, appositives, and nouns of address in these sentences and tell whether the verb is transitive active (ta), transitive passive (tp), intransitive linking (il), or intransitive complete (ic).

1. The man with an armful of presents tripped and fell.

2. Into the clearing staggered the wounded soldier.

3. The company president, Mr. Mabey, lost his temper.

4. Wilma, where did you put my book?

5. Shelley, Keats, and Byron are famous poets.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. tripped / fell = verbs (ic), man = subject

2. staggered = verb (ic), soldier = subject

3. lost = verb (ta), president = subject, temper = direct object, Mr. Mabey = appositive (possibly noun of address)

4. did put = verb (ta), you = subject, book = direct object, Wilma = noun of address

5. are = verb (il), Shelley/Keats/Byron = subjects, poets = predicate nominative


For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html.