Friday, September 22, 2017

Lesson 270 - Parts of the Sentence - Adverb Clauses

Adverb clauses like adjective clauses can give variety to your sentences. Sometimes we find adverb clauses that have left some words out. They are called reduced adverb clauses. Example: While (she was) speaking to the timid student, the teacher spoke slowly.

Instructions: Find the adverb clauses in these sentences and tell what word they modify. If it is a reduced adverb clause or elliptical adverb clause add the missing words.

1. You act as if I enjoy punishing you.

2. The contractor roughened the concrete while it was still wet.

3. My sister is smarter than I.

4. The manager talked with the workers after listening to their suggestions.

5. Before returning to work, he ate his lunch.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. as if I enjoy punishing you modifies the verb act

2. while it was still wet modifies the verb roughened

3. than I (am smart) modifies the predicate adjective smarter

4. after (he had listened) to their suggestions modifies the verb talked

5. Before (he returned) to work modifies the verb ate

For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html. Our lessons are also available to purchase in eBook and Workbook format.

Thursday, September 21, 2017

Lesson 269 - Parts of the Sentence - Adverb Clauses

Adverb clauses like adjective clauses can give variety to your sentences. Sometimes we find adverb clauses that have left some words out. They are called reduced adverb clauses. Example: While (she was) speaking to the timid student, the teacher spoke slowly.

Instructions: Rewrite the following reduced adverb clauses adding the missing words.

1. After hearing the terrible noise, they ran for their lives.

2. The customer paid for his groceries when passing through the check out stand.

3. Allen is only happy while participating in an argument.

4. Before leaving for the hike, the boy scouts were warned about snakes.

5. Until watering the lawn in the morning, he didn't see the dandelions in it.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. After they had heard the terrible noise, they ran for their lives.

2. The customer paid for his groceries when he passed through the check out stand.

3. Allen is only happy while he is participating in an argument.

4. Before they left for the hike, the boy scouts were warned about snakes.

5. Until he had watered the lawn in the morning, he didn't see the dandelions in it.

For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html. Our lessons are also available to purchase in an eBook and a Workbook format.

Wednesday, September 20, 2017

Lesson 268 - Parts of the Sentence - Adverb Clauses

Adverb clauses like adjective clauses can give variety to your sentences. Sometimes we find adverb clauses that have left some words out. They are called reduced adverb clauses. Example: While (she was) speaking to the timid student, the teacher spoke slowly.

Instructions: Reduce the adverb clauses in these sentences.

1. While he was watching the geese, he saw the fox.

2. Richard got a thorn in his finger when he was pruning the roses.

3. The cat meowed loudly after it searched for a way into the house.

4. Although the man feared being ostracized, he continued helping everyone.

5. Will measured the board again before he made his final cut.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. While watching the geese, he saw the fox.

2. Richard got a thorn in his finger when pruning the roses.

3. The cat meowed loudly after searching for a way into the house.

4. Although fearing being ostracized, the man continued helping everyone.

5. Will measured the board again before making his final cut.

For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html. Our lessons are also available to purchase in an eBook and a Workbook format.

Tuesday, September 19, 2017

Lesson 267 - Parts of the Sentence - Adverb Clauses

Adverb clauses like adjective clauses can give variety to your sentences.

Instructions: Combine the following sentences using adverb clauses at the beginning of the sentence.

1. Frank started medical training. He drove a forklift for a living.

2. The rains had started the mud slides. The homes were not safe to live in.

3. Older people love to sit in the park. They feed the birds and visit.

4. I enjoyed camping out. I was much younger.

5. Joe recognized the man. The man had stopped his car to help.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

Several different subordinate conjunctions can be used to combine adverb clauses with independent clauses, but I will only show one possibility.

1. Before Frank started medical training, he drove a forklift for a living.

2. Because the rains had started the mud slides, the homes were not safe to live in.

3. While they feed the birds and visit, older people love to sit in the park.

4. When I was much younger, I enjoyed camping out.

5. After the man had stopped his car to help, Joe recognized him.

For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html. Our lessons are also available to purchase in eBook and Workbook format.

Monday, September 18, 2017

Lesson 266 - Parts of the Sentence - Adverb Clauses

Adverb clauses like adjective clauses can give variety to your sentences.

Instructions: Combine the following sentences using adverb clauses at the end of the sentence.

1. We watched the robins. They raised their young in our apple tree.

2. Becky read the book. It was recommended by a friend.

3. Dad donates his suits to charity. He has worn them a year.

4. The policemen delayed the drivers. The wrecks were cleared.

5. Ann ate an apple. She studied her vocabulary.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

Several different subordinate conjunctions can be used to combine adverb clauses with independent clauses, but I will only show one possibility.

1. We watched the robins while they raised their young in our apple tree.

2. Becky read the book since it was recommended by a friend.

3. Dad donates his suits to charity after he has worn them a year.

4. The policemen delayed the drivers until the wrecks were cleared.

5. Ann ate an apple as she studied her vocabulary.

For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html. Our lessons are also available to purchase in an eBook and a Workbook format.

Saturday, September 16, 2017

Quiz for Lessons 261 - 265 - Parts of the Sentence - Adverb Clauses

Instructions: Find the adverb clauses in the following sentences and tell what they modify.

1. I am hungrier than I thought.

2. We left before the game was over.

3. Lee is older than Bill.

4. While I was waiting for the phone call, I read a book.

5. If you don't believe me, ask my wife.

6. Are you upset because I didn't call?

7. The alarm rang while I was in the shower.

8. Open the window so that we can have some fresh air.

9. Paul will take you home when you are ready.

10. You shouldn't say those things unless you are certain about their validity.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. than I thought modifies the predicate adjective hungrier

2. before the game was over modifies the verb left

3. than Bill (is old) modifies the predicate adjective older

4. While I was waiting for the phone call modifies the verb read

5. If you don't believe me modifies the verb ask

6. because I didn't call modifies the predicate adjective upset

7. while I was in the shower modifies the verb rang

8. so that we can have some fresh air modifies the verb open

9. when you are ready modifies the verb will take

10. unless you are certain about their validity modifies the verb should say

For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html. Our lessons are also available to purchase in an eBook and a Workbook format.

Friday, September 15, 2017

Lesson 265 - Parts of the Sentence - Adverb Clauses

A complex sentence is made up of an independent clause and a dependent clause. Example: The television was playing (independent clause which can stand alone and make sense) as I left the room (dependent clause which must be attached to the independent clause to make sense). There are three kinds of dependent clauses: adjective clause, adverb clause and noun clause.

An adverb clause is a dependent clause that modifies a verb, adjective, or another adverb. It usually modifies the verb.

Adverb clauses are introduced by subordinate conjunctions including after, although, as, as if, before, because, if, since, so that, than, though, unless, until, when, where, and while. These are just some of the more common ones.

Example: They arrived before the game had ended. ("before the game had ended" is the adverb clause modifying the verb arrived telling when.)

Sometimes the adverb clause is placed at the beginning of the sentence. When it introduces the sentence, it is always set off with a comma. Example: Before the game had ended, they arrived.

Than and as introduce clauses that are called elliptical clauses. That is they have some of their parts understood but not stated. Example: You are smarter than I. (am smart.) They always modify the comparative word (smarter).

Instructions: Find the adverb clauses in the following sentences and tell what they modify.

1. Ila reads music better than Becky.

2. The dog whined sadly as I walked into the house.

3. If you have time, finish doing the dishes for me.

4. Many operations are unsuccessful because the patient is not careful afterwards.

5. Whenever I go out the door, the dog barks to go also.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. than Becky (can read music well) modifies the adverb better

2. as I walked into the house modifies the verb whined

3. If you have time modifies the verb finish

4. because the patient in not careful afterwards modifies the predicate adjective unsuccessful

5. Whenever I go out the door modifies the verb barks

For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html. Our lessons are also available to purchase in eBook and Workbook format.

Thursday, September 14, 2017

Lesson 264 - Parts of the Sentence - Adverb Clauses

A complex sentence is made up of an independent clause and a dependent clause. Example: The television was playing (independent clause which can stand alone and make sense) as I left the room (dependent clause which must be attached to the independent clause to make sense). There are three kinds of dependent clauses: adjective clause, adverb clause and noun clause.

An adverb clause is a dependent clause that modifies a verb, adjective, or another adverb. It usually modifies the verb.

Adverb clauses are introduced by subordinate conjunctions including after, although, as, as if, before, because, if, since, so that, than, though, unless, until, when, where, and while. These are just some of the more common ones.

Example: They arrived before the game had ended. ("before the game had ended" is the adverb clause modifying the verb arrived telling when.)

Sometimes the adverb clause is placed at the beginning of the sentence. When it introduces the sentence, it is always set off with a comma. Example: Before the game had ended, they arrived.

Than and as introduce clauses that are called elliptical clauses. That is they have some of their parts understood but not stated. Example: You are smarter than I. (am smart.) They always modify the comparative word (smarter).

Instructions: Find the adverb clauses in the following sentences and tell what they modify.

1. Although I became tired, I enjoyed the hike.

2. You cannot become an expert driver until you drive for several years.

3. Buy that coat now because it might be sold tomorrow.

4. I cannot reach the top window unless I have a ladder.

5. After you have eaten lunch, we will leave for New York.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. Although I became tired modifies the verb enjoyed

2. until you drive for several years modifies the verb can become

3. because it might be sold tomorrow modifies the verb buy

4. unless I have a ladder modifies the verb can reach

5. After you have eaten lunch modifies the verb will leave

For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html. Our lessons are also available to purchase in an eBook and a Workbook format.

Wednesday, September 13, 2017

Lesson 263 - Parts of the Sentence - Adverb Clauses

A complex sentence is made up of an independent clause and a dependent clause. Example: The television was playing (independent clause which can stand alone and make sense) as I left the room (dependent clause which must be attached to the independent clause to make sense). There are three kinds of dependent clauses: adjective clause, adverb clause and noun clause.

An adverb clause is a dependent clause that modifies a verb, adjective, or another adverb. It usually modifies the verb.

Adverb clauses are introduced by subordinate conjunctions including after, although, as, as if, before, because, if, since, so that, than, though, unless, until, when, where, and while. These are just some of the more common ones.

Example: They arrived before the game had ended. ("before the game had ended" is the adverb clause modifying the verb arrived telling when.)

Sometimes the adverb clause is placed at the beginning of the sentence. When it introduces the sentence, it is always set off with a comma. Example: Before the game had ended, they arrived.

Than and as introduce clauses that are called elliptical clauses. That is they have some of their parts understood but not stated. Example: You are smarter than I. (am smart.) They always modify the comparative word (smarter).

Instructions: Complete the elliptical adverb clauses in the following sentences and tell what they modify.

1. My dog is older than I.

2. Jim can run faster than Jeff.

3. Pam spells more accurately than she keyboards.

4. He is trying as hard as James.

5. Barbara is a better tennis player than Jeanne.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. My dog is older than I am old. than I am old modifies the predicate adjective older

2. Jim can run faster than Jeff can run fast. than Jeff can run fast modifies the adverb faster

3. Pam spells more accurately than she keyboards accurately. than she keyboards accurately modifies the adverb accurately

4. He is trying as hard as James is trying hard. as James is trying hard modifies the adverb hard

5. Barbara is a better tennis player than Jeanne is a good tennis player. than Jeanne is a good tennis player modifies the adjective better

For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html. Our lessons are also available to purchase in an eBook and a Workbook format.

Tuesday, September 12, 2017

Lesson 262 - Parts of the Sentence - Adverb Clauses

A complex sentence is made up of an independent clause and a dependent clause. Example: The television was playing (independent clause which can stand alone and make sense) as I left the room (dependent clause which must be attached to the independent clause to make sense). There are three kinds of dependent clauses: adjective clause, adverb clause and noun clause.

An adverb clause is a dependent clause that modifies a verb, adjective, or another adverb. It usually modifies the verb.

Adverb clauses are introduced by subordinate conjunctions including after, although, as, as if, before, because, if, since, so that, than, though, unless, until, when, where, and while. These are just some of the more common ones.

Example: They arrived before the game had ended. ("before the game had ended" is the adverb clause modifying the verb arrived telling when.)

Sometimes the adverb clause is placed at the beginning of the sentence. When it introduces the sentence, it is always set off with a comma. Example: Before the game had ended, they arrived.

Instructions: Find the adverb clauses in the following sentences and tell what they modify.

1. When you came from the garage, did you see the mower there?

2. Because the field was muddy, the game had to be cancelled.

3. Although you should return to class, just wait here for me.

4. As I sat motionless, the two squirrels came closer and closer.

5. Since I can spare only a few minutes, please be brief with your presentation.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. When you came from the garage modifies the verb did see

2. Because the field was muddy modifies the verbal to be cancelled

3. Although you should return to class modifies the verb wait

4. As I sat motionless modifies the verb came

5. Since I can spare only a few minutes modifies the predicate adjective brief

For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html. Our lessons are also available to purchase in eBook and Workbook format.

Monday, September 11, 2017

Lesson 261 - Parts of the Sentence - Adverb Clauses

A complex sentence is made up of an independent clause and a dependent clause. Example: The television was playing (independent clause which can stand alone and make sense) as I left the room (dependent clause which must be attached to the independent clause to make sense). There are three kinds of dependent clauses: adjective clause, adverb clause and noun clause.

An adverb clause is a dependent clause that modifies a verb, adjective, or another adverb. It usually modifies the verb.

Adverb clauses are introduced by subordinate conjunctions including after, although, as, as if, before, because, if, since, so that, than, though, unless, until, when, where, and while. These are just some of the more common ones.

Example: They arrived before the game had ended. ("before the game had ended" is the adverb clause modifying the verb arrived telling when.)

Instructions: Find the adverb clauses in the following sentences and tell what they modify.

1. You clean the bathroom while I clean the carpet.

2. Ann was confident that she would play the best.

3. Bring in the toys before they get destroyed.

4. I stood on the box so that I could see the top of the shelf.

5. Your face becomes red when you are angry.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. while I clean the carpet modifies the verb clean

2. that she would play the best modifies the predicate adjective confident

3. before they get destroyed modifies the verb bring

4. so that I could see the top of the shelf modifies the verb stood

5. when you are angry modifies the verb becomes

For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html. Our lessons are also available to purchase in an eBook and a Workbook format.

Saturday, September 9, 2017

Quiz for Lessons 256 - 260 - Parts of the Sentence - Adjective Clauses

Instructions: Combine the following sentences using an adjective clause using the introductory words who, whose, whom, which, that, when, and where.

1. The occasion was a momentous one for all. All the family were together at last.

2. The site has several steep slopes. The million-dollar home will be built there.

3. The time was very exciting. Our team won the championship.

4. The author wrote the novel. He received a Pulitzer Prize.

5. I recall the time. There was no freeway to Salt Lake City then.

Instructions: Rewrite the following sentences placing the adjective clause in the correct place.

6. The little dog was running behind the boy that was growling and barking fiercely.

7. The trunk of the passenger was placed on the train which was covered with travel stickers.

8. A dog ran onto the football field which looked like the team mascot.

9. The car is now in our garage that was in a wreck yesterday.

10. The crickets were the targets of our poison bait which were destroying our crops.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. The occasion when all the family were together at last was a momentous one for all.

2. The site where the million-dollar home will be built has several steep slopes.

3. The time when our team won the championship was very exciting.

4. The author who received a Pulitzer Prize wrote the novel.

5. I recall the time when there was no freeway to Salt Lake City.

6. The little dog that was growling and barking fiercely was running behind the boy.

7. The passenger's trunk which was covered with travel stickers was placed on the train.

8. A dog which looked like the team mascot ran onto the football field.

9. The car that was in a wreck yesterday is now in our garage.

10. The crickets which were destroying our crops were the targets of our poison bait.

For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html. Our lessons are also available to purchase in an eBook and a Workbook format.

Friday, September 8, 2017

Lesson 260 - Parts of the Sentence - Adjective Clauses

In using an adjective clause, you should always place it as near to the word it modifies as possible. If you misplace the adjective clause, it makes a ridiculous sentence or one that is unclear. Examples: (incorrect) = I waved to my dog from the car that had just licked my face. (The car did not lick my face; the dog did.) (correct) = From the car I waved to my dog that had just licked my face. (Now the clause is as close as it can be to the word it modifies. That is next to dog.)

Instructions: Rewrite the following sentences placing the adjective clause in the correct place.

1. The tall man was stopped by a police officer who had been acting suspiciously.

2. We found the key under the couch that had been lost.

3. She took the letter to the post office which she had written earlier.

4. The rosebush is next to a weedy lot that is very beautiful.

5. The tanker sailed into the harbor which was carrying a load of oil.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. The tall man who had been acting suspiciously was stopped by a police officer.

2. We found the key that had been lost under the couch.

3. She took the letter which she had written earlier to the post office.

4. The rosebush that is very beautiful is next to a weedy lot.

5. The tanker which was carrying a load of oil sailed into the harbor.

For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html. Our lessons are also available to purchase in eBook and Workbook format.

Thursday, September 7, 2017

Lesson 259 - Parts of the Sentence - Adjective Clauses

In using an adjective clause, you should always place it as near to the word it modifies as possible. If you misplace the adjective clause, it makes a ridiculous sentence or one that is unclear. Examples: (incorrect) = I waved to my dog from the car that had just licked my face. (The car did not lick my face; the dog did.) (correct) = From the car I waved to my dog that had just licked my face. (Now the clause is as close as it can be to the word it modifies. That is next to dog.)

Instructions: Rewrite the following sentences placing the adjective clause in the correct place.

1. They drove to the lake in their new car where they love to fish for bass.

2. The large limousine pulled up to the curb which was loaded with students for the prom.

3. The new tricycle was smashed on the driveway that had been delivered yesterday.

4. We showed the pictures to our friends that we had taken at the wedding.

5. We caught several fish with the new bait which we cooked for dinner.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. They drove in their new car to the lake where they love to fish for bass.

2. The large limousine which was loaded with students for the prom pulled up to the curb.

3. The new tricycle that had been delivered yesterday was smashed on the driveway.

4. We showed to our friends the pictures that we had taken at the wedding.

5. We caught with the new bait several fish which we cooked for dinner.

For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html. Our lessons are also available to purchase in an eBook and a Workbook format.

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