Thursday, October 19, 2017

Lesson 289 - Parts of the Sentence - Sentence Variety

Having learned about phrases and clauses, let's now use the following phrases and clauses to give variety to our writing: participial phrases, adverb clauses, adjective clauses, compound sentences or verbs.

First identify which of the above ways is used in the sentence, and then rewrite it using the three other ways identifying each of the methods used.

Example: Having finished my lessons, I sat back and gloried in my effort. = participial phrase

You must rewrite it using an adverb clause, adjective clause, and either a compound sentence or a simple sentence with compound verbs.

I finished my lessons, sat back, and gloried in my effort. = compound verbs

After I had finished my lessons, I sat back and gloried in my effort. = adverb clause

I who had finished my lessons sat back and gloried in my effort. = adjective clause

Instructions: Identify the written sentence and rewrite it the other three ways.

1. Standing nervously in the wings of the theater, Jeanne practiced her lines quietly and waited to go on stage.

2. The detective searched carefully through the old desk as he recounted in his mind the importance of the will.

3. The small black dog which looked weak and harmless leaped suddenly at the stranger.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. participial phrase

Jeanne stood nervously in the wings of the theater and practiced her lines quietly while she waited to go on stage. = adverb clause

Jeanne stood nervously in the wings of the theater, practiced her lines quietly, and waited to go on stage. = compound verbs

Jeanne who practiced her lines quietly stood nervously in the wings of the theater and waited to go on stage. = adjective clause

2. adverb clause

The detective searched carefully through the old desk, and he recounted in his mind the importance of the will. = compound sentence

Recounting in his mind the importance of the will, the detective searched carefully through the old desk. = participial phrase

The detective who searched carefully through the old desk recounted in his mind the importance of the will. = adjective clause

3. adjective clause

Looking weak and harmless, the small black dog leaped suddenly at the stranger. = participial phrase

Although he looked weak and harmless, the small black dog leaped suddenly at the stranger. = adverb clause

The small black dog looked weak and harmless but leaped suddenly at the stranger. = compound verbs

For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html. Our lessons are also available to purchase in an eBook and a Workbook format.

Wednesday, October 18, 2017

Lesson 288 - Parts of the Sentence - Sentence Variety

Having learned about phrases and clauses, let's now use the following phrases and clauses to give variety to our writing: participial phrases, adverb clauses, adjective clauses, compound sentences or verbs.

First identify which of the above ways is used in the sentence, and then rewrite it using the three other ways identifying each of the methods used.

Example: Having finished my lessons, I sat back and gloried in my effort. = participial phrase

You must rewrite it using an adverb clause, adjective clause, and either a compound sentence or a simple sentence with compound verbs.

I finished my lessons, sat back, and gloried in my effort. = compound verbs

After I had finished my lessons, I sat back and gloried in my effort. = adverb clause

I who had finished my lessons sat back and gloried in my effort. = adjective clause

Instructions: Identify the written sentence and rewrite it the other three ways.

1. The engineer knew the train was on time, leaned against the side, and sighed with relief.

2. Hoping to have the seating in place by evening, the committee for the Olympics hurriedly set up bleachers along the main road.

3. Mark took a quick, refreshing swim in the mountain lake before he returned to the cabin for breakfast.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. compound verbs

Knowing the train was on time, the engineer leaned against the side and sighed with relief. = participial phrase

The engineer that knew the train was on time leaned against the side and sighed with relief. = adjective clause

When the engineer leaned against the side and sighed with relief, he knew the train was on time. = adverb clause

2. participial phrase

The committee for the Olympics hoped to have the seating in place by evening and hurriedly set up bleachers along the main road. = compound verb

The committee for the Olympics that hoped to have the seating in place by evening hurriedly set up bleachers along the main road. = adjective clause

Because they hoped to have the seating in place by evening, the committee for the Olympics hurriedly set up bleachers along the main road. = adverb clause

3. adverb clause

Having taken a quick, refreshing swim in the mountain lake, Mark returned to the cabin for breakfast. = participial phrase

Mark who had taken a quick, refreshing swim in the mountain lake returned to the cabin for breakfast. = adjective clause

Mark took a quick, refreshing swim in the mountain lake and returned to the cabin for breakfast. = compound verbs

For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html. Our lessons are also available to purchase in an eBook and a Workbook format.

Tuesday, October 17, 2017

Lesson 287 - Parts of the Sentence - Sentence Variety

Having learned about phrases and clauses, let's now use the following phrases and clauses to give variety to our writing: participial phrases, adverb clauses, adjective clauses, compound sentences or verbs.

First identify which of the above ways is used in the sentence, and then rewrite it using the three other ways identifying each of the methods used.

Example: Having finished my lessons, I sat back and gloried in my effort. = participial phrase

You must rewrite it using an adverb clause, adjective clause, and either a compound sentence or a simple sentence with compound verbs.

I finished my lessons, sat back, and gloried in my effort. = compound verbs

After I had finished my lessons, I sat back and gloried in my effort. = adverb clause

I who had finished my lessons sat back and gloried in my effort. = adjective clause

Instructions: Identify the written sentence and rewrite it the other three ways.

1. At dusk the manager threw the electrical switch, and the amusement park lit up like a star-studded galaxy.

2. As he walked out on the wire and completed his various routines, the acrobat carefully demonstrated his intricate ability.

3. The people who saw the basketball star surged against the restraints and called out compliments and greetings.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. compound sentence

Throwing the electrical switch at dusk, the manager lit up the amusement park like a star-studded galaxy. = participial phrase

At dusk the manager who threw the electrical switch lit up the amusement park like a star-studded galaxy. = adjective clause

After the manager threw the electrical switch, the amusement park lit up like a star-studded galaxy at dusk. = adverb clause

2. participial phrase

When he had demonstrated his intricate ability, the acrobat carefully walked out on the wire and completed his various routines. = adverb clause

The acrobat demonstrated his intricate ability, carefully walked out on the wire, and completed his various routines. = compound verbs

The acrobat who carefully walked out on the wire and completed his various routines demonstrated his intricate ability. = adjective clause

3. adjective clause

Seeing the basketball star, the people surged against the restraints and called out compliments and greetings. = participial phrase

When the people saw the basketball star, they surged against the restraints and called out compliments and greetings. = adverb clause

The people saw the basketball star, and they surged against the restraints and called out compliments and greetings. = compound sentence

For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html. Our lessons are also available to purchase in eBook and Workbook format.

Monday, October 16, 2017

Lesson 286 - Parts of the Sentence - Sentence Variety

Having learned about phrases and clauses, let's now use the following phrases and clauses to give variety to our writing: participial phrases, adverb clauses, adjective clauses, compound sentences, or verbs.

First identify which of the above ways is used in the sentence, and then rewrite it using the three other ways identifying each of the methods used.

Example: Having finished my lessons, I sat back and gloried in my effort. = participial phrase

You must rewrite it using an adverb clause, adjective clause, and either a compound sentence or a simple sentence with compound verbs.

I finished my lessons, sat back, and gloried in my effort. = compound verbs

After I had finished my lessons, I sat back and gloried in my effort. = adverb clause

I who had finished my lessons sat back and gloried in my effort. = adjective clause

Instructions: Identify the written sentence and rewrite it the other three ways.

1. Watching the sunset above the mountain, John noticed the colors blending softly into one another.

2. The excited horse pawed the ground rapidly while it chewed on its bit and neighed continually.

3. The pilot climbed into his jet plane, adjusted his helmet, and attached his oxygen pack.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

(My rewrites are only one way that can be used. Other ways may be possible.)

1. participial phrase

John watched the sunset above the mountain, and he noticed the colors blending softly into one another. = compound sentence

While he watched the sunset above the mountain, John noticed the colors blending softly into one another. = adverb clause

John who was watching the sunset above the mountain noticed the colors blending softly into one another. = adjective clause

2. adverb clause

The excited horse which pawed the ground rapidly chewed on its bit and neighed continually. = adjective clause

Pawing the ground rapidly, the excited horse chewed on its bit and neighed continually. = participial phrase

The excited horse pawed the ground rapidly, chewed its bit, and neighed continually = compound verbs

3. compound verbs

Climbing into his jet plane, the pilot adjusted his helmet and attached his oxygen pack. = participial phrase

After he climbed into his jet plane, the pilot adjusted his helmet and attached his oxygen pack. = adverb clause

The pilot who climbed into his jet plane adjusted his helmet and attached his oxygen pack. = adjective clause

For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html. Our lessons are also available to purchase in an eBook and a Workbook format.

Saturday, October 14, 2017

Quiz for Lessons 281 - 285 - Parts of the Sentence - Clauses Review

Instructions: Using all the knowledge learned in the previous lessons, find the verb (v), subjects (subj), predicate nominatives (pn), direct objects (do), appositives (app), nouns of address (na), adjectives (adj), predicate adjectives (pa), adverbs (adv), prepositions (prep), objects of the preposition (op), prepositional phrases (p ph), indirect objects (io), and objective complements (oc) in the following sentences.

If the word is verbal, tell whether it is a gerund, participle, noun infinitive, adjective infinitive, or adverb infinitive. Tell which word the adjective, adverb, prepositional phrase, verbal, or verbal phrase modify.

If the sentence has a dependent clause, tell whether it is a noun clause, adverb clause, or adjective clause. Tell which word the adverb and adjective clause modify. Tell how the noun clause is used.

1. We offered whoever caused the accident a chance to confess.

2. The man whose leg was amputated was glad to be alive.

3. The judge is the person to whom you should talk.

4. When the mayor explained his plan, the citizens were pleased.

5. It is unfortunate that you do not agree.

6. The news that thousands had been killed was correct.

7. This house is where your grandmother lived.

8. Why you don't like him is hard to understand.

9. If you are unable to find it, call me at home.

10. The manager said that everyone would get a raise.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. offered = verb, we = subject, chance = direct object, a = adjective modifying chance, to confess = adjective infinitive used as object complement; (whoever caused the accident) = noun clause used as an indirect object, caused = verb, whoever = noun clause introductory word used as the subject, accident = direct object, the = adjective modifying accident

2. was = verb, man = subject, the = adjective modifying man, glad = predicate adjective modifying man, to be = adverb infinitive modifying glad, alive = predicate adjective to the infinitive to be; (whose leg was amputated) = adjective clause modifying man, was amputated = verb, leg = subject, whose = adjective modifying leg

3. is = verb, judge = subject, person = predicate nominative, the = adjective modifying judge, the = adjective modifying person; to whom you should talk = adjective prepositional phrase modifying person, (whom you should talk) = noun clause used as the object of the preposition, should talk = verb, you = subject, whom = noun clause introductory word used as the direct object

4. were pleased = verb, citizens = subject, the = adjective modifying citizens; (when the mayor explained his plan) = adverb clause modifying were pleased, explained = verb, mayor = subject, plan = direct object, the = adjective modifying mayor, his = adjective modifying plan, when = subordinate conjunction introducing the adverb clause

5. is = verb, it = subject, unfortunate = predicate adjective modifying it; (that you do not agree) = adverb clause modifying unfortunate, do agree = verb, you = subject, not = adverb modifying do agree, that = subordinate conjunction introducing the adverb clause

6. was = verb, news = subject, correct = predicate adjective modifying news, the = adjective modifying news; (that thousands had been killed) = noun clause used as an appositive, had been killed = verb, thousands = subject, that = noun introductory word that does not fit grammatically with the sentence

7. is = verb, house = subject, this = adjective modifying house; (where your grandmother lived) = noun clause used as a predicate nominative, lived = verb, grandmother = subject, your = adjective modifying grandmother, where = noun clause introductory word used as an adverb modifying lived

8. is = verb; (why you don't like him) = noun clause used as the subject, do like = verb, you = subject, him = direct object, n't = adverb modifying do like, why = noun clause introductory word used as an adverb modifying do like; hard = predicate adjective modifying the noun clause, to understand = adverb infinitive modifying hard

9. call = verb, (you understood) = subject, me = direct object, at home = adverb prepositional phrase modifying call, at = preposition, home = object of the preposition; (if you are unable to find it) = adverb clause modifying call, are = verb, you = subject, unable = predicate adjective modifying you, to find = adverb infinitive modifying unable, it = direct object to the infinitive, if = subordinate conjunction introducing the adverb clause

10. said = verb, manager = subject, the = adjective modifying manager; (that everyone would get a raise) = noun clause used as the direct object, would get = verb, everyone = subject, raise = direct object, a = adjective modifying raise, that = noun clause introductory word that does not fit grammatically with the sentence

For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html. Our lessons are also available to purchase in an eBook and a Workbook format.

Friday, October 13, 2017

Lesson 285 - Parts of the Sentence - Clauses Review

Instructions: Using all the knowledge learned in the previous lessons, find the verb (v), subjects (subj), predicate nominatives (pn), direct objects (do), appositives (app), nouns of address (na), adjectives (adj), predicate adjectives (pa), adverbs (adv), prepositions (prep), objects of the preposition (op), prepositional phrases (p ph), indirect objects (io), and objective complements (oc) in the following sentences.

If the word is verbal, tell whether it is a gerund, participle, noun infinitive, adjective infinitive, or adverb infinitive. Tell which word the adjective, adverb, prepositional phrase, verbal, or verbal phrase modify.

If the sentence has a dependent clause, tell whether it is a noun clause, adverb clause, or adjective clause. Tell which word the adverb and adjective clause modify. Tell how the noun clause is used.

1. Now I understand why you didn't tell me.

2. Whenever you do well, you will be rewarded.

3. The instrument that he plays is not the French horn.

4. Sam explained how you could save money daily.

5. The man whom I met at the store knew my father.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. understand = verb, I = subject, now = adverb modifying understand; (why you didn't tell me) = noun clause used as the direct object, did tell = verb, you = subject, me = direct object, n't = adverb modifying did tell, why = noun clause introductory word used as an adverb modifying did  tell

2. will be rewarded = verb, you = subject; (whenever you do well) = adverb clause modifying will be rewarded, do = verb, you = subject, well = adverb modifying do, whenever = subordinate conjunction introducing the adverb clause

3. is = verb, instrument = subject, the = adjective modifying instrument, horn = predicate nominative, the/French = adjectives modifying horn; (that he plays) = adjective clause modifying instrument, plays = verb, he = subject, that = adjective clause introductory word used as a direct object

4. explained = verb, Sam = subject; (how you could save money daily) = noun clause used as the direct object, could save = verb, you = subject, money = direct object, how/daily = adverbs modifying could save

5. knew = verb, man = subject, father = direct object, my = adjective modifying father, the = adjective modifying man; (whom I met at the store) = adjective clause modifying man, met = verb, I = subject, whom = adjective clause introductory word used as the direct object to met, at the store = adverb prepositional phrase modifying met, at = preposition, store = object of the preposition, the = adjective modifying store

For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html. Our lessons are also available to purchase in eBook and Workbook format.

Thursday, October 12, 2017

Lesson 284 - Parts of the Sentence - Clauses Review

Instructions: Using all the knowledge learned in the previous lessons, find the verb (v), subjects (subj), predicate nominatives (pn), direct objects (do), appositives (app), nouns of address (na), adjectives (adj), predicate adjectives (pa), adverbs (adv), prepositions (prep), objects of the preposition (op), prepositional phrases (p ph), indirect objects (io), and objective complements (oc) in the following sentences.

If the word is verbal, tell whether it is a gerund, participle, noun infinitive, adjective infinitive, or adverb infinitive. Tell which word the adjective, adverb, prepositional phrase, verbal, or verbal phrase modify.

If the sentence has a dependent clause, tell whether it is a noun clause, adverb clause, or adjective clause. Tell which word the adverb and adjective clause modify. Tell how the noun clause is used.

1. Joe thinks he can win at the slots.

2. That one should always do his best is certain to bring success.

3. The fact was that I was not in town.

4. The girl ran more quickly to her mother than her brother.

5. Although a skilled person will be better prepared, he may not find work.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. thinks = verb, Joe = subject; (he can win at the slots) = noun clause used as the direct object with an understood introductory word that, can win = verb, he = subject, at the slots = adverb prepositional phrase modifying can win, at = preposition, slots = object of the preposition, the = adjective modifying slots

2. is = verb, (that one should always do his best) = noun clause used as the subject, should do = verb, one = subject, best = direct object, his = adjective modifying best, always = adverb modifying should do, that = noun clause introductory word that does not fit grammatically with the sentence; certain = predicate adjective modifying (that one should always do his best) the subject, to bring = adverb infinitive modifying certain, success = direct object to the infinitive to bring

3. was = verb, fact = subject, the = adjective modifying fact; (that I was not in town) = noun clause used as the predicate nominative, was = verb, I = subject, not = adverb modifying was, in town = adverb prepositional phrase modifying was, in = preposition, town = object of the preposition, that = noun clause introductory word that does not fit grammatically with the  sentence

4. ran = verb, girl = subject, the = adjective modifying girl, quickly = adverb modifying ran, more = adverb modifying quickly, to her mother = adverb prepositional phrase modifying ran, to = preposition, mother = object of the preposition, her = adjective modifying mother; (than her brother [ran quickly to his mother] understood part of the clause) = adverb elliptical clause modifying more, ran = understood verb, brother = subject, her = adjective modifying brother, quickly = understood adverb modifying understood ran, to his mother = understood prepositional phrase modifying ran, to = understood preposition, mother = understood object of the preposition, his = understood adjective modifying mother, than = subordinate conjunction introducing the adverb clause

5. may find = verb, he = subject, work = direct object, not = adverb modifying may find; (although a skilled person will be better prepared) = adverb clause modifying may find, will be = verb, person = subject, a = adjective modifying person, skilled = participle modifying person, prepared = participle modifying person used as the predicate adjective, better = adverb modifying prepared, although = subordinate conjunction introducing the adverb clause

For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html. Our lessons are also available to purchase in an eBook and a Workbook format.

Wednesday, October 11, 2017

Lesson 283 - Parts of the Sentence - Clauses Review

Instructions: Using all the knowledge learned in the previous lessons, find the verb (v), subjects (subj), predicate nominatives (pn), direct objects (do), appositives (app), nouns of address (na), adjectives (adj), predicate adjectives (pa), adverbs (adv), prepositions (prep), objects of the preposition (op), prepositional phrases (p ph), indirect objects (io), and objective complements (oc) in the following sentences.

If the word is verbal, tell whether it is a gerund, participle, noun infinitive, adjective infinitive, or adverb infinitive. Tell which word the adjective, adverb, prepositional phrase, verbal, or verbal phrase modify.

If the sentence has a dependent clause, tell whether it is a noun clause, adverb clause, or adjective clause. Tell which word the adverb and adjective clause modify. Tell how the noun clause is used.

1. The woman had several broken bones because her bones were weak.

2. What the man wanted was a free ride through life.

3. I hope that I can learn to use the computer.

4. Do not eat the fruit that has fallen on the ground.

5. We waited until the doctor reported the operation a success.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. had = verb, woman = subject, bones = direct object, the = adjective modifying woman, several = adjective modifying bones, broken = participle modifying bones; (because her bones were weak) = adverb clause modifying the verb had, were = verb, bones = subject, weak = predicate adjective modifying bones, her = adjective modifying bones, because = subordinate conjunction introducing the adverb clause

2. was = verb, (what the man wanted) = noun clause used as the subject, wanted = verb, man = subject, what = noun introductory word used as the direct object, the = adjective modifying man; ride = predicate nominative, a/free = adjectives modifying ride, through life = adjective prepositional phrase modifying ride, through = preposition, life = object of the preposition

3. hope = verb, I = subject; (that I can learn to use the computer) = noun clause used as the direct object, can learn = verb, I = subject, to use the computer = infinitive phrase used as the direct object, to use = infinitive, computer = direct object of the infinitive to use, the = adjective modifying computer, that = noun clause introductory word that does not fit grammatically with the sentence

4. do eat = verb, (you understood) = subject, fruit = direct object, the = adjective modifying fruit, not = adverb modifying do eat; (that has fallen on the ground) = adjective clause modifying fruit, has fallen = verb, that = adjective clause introductory word used as the subject equaling fruit, on the ground = adverb prepositional phrase modifying has fallen, on = preposition, ground = object of the preposition, the = adjective modifying ground

5. waited = verb, we = subject; (until the doctor reported the operation a success) = adverb clause modifying waited, reported = verb, doctor = subject, operation = direct object, the = adjective modifying doctor, the = adjective modifying operation, success = object complement modifying operation, a = adjective modifying success, until = subordinate conjunction introducing an adverb clause

For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html. Our lessons are also available to purchase in an eBook and a Workbook format.

Tuesday, October 10, 2017

Lesson 282 - Parts of the Sentence - Clauses Review

Instructions: Using all the knowledge learned in the previous lessons, find the verb (v), subjects (subj), predicate nominatives (pn), direct objects (do), appositives (app), nouns of address (na), adjectives (adj), predicate adjectives (pa), adverbs (adv), prepositions (prep), objects of the preposition (op), prepositional phrases (p ph), indirect objects (io), and objective complements (oc) in the following sentences.

If the word is verbal, tell whether it is a gerund, participle, noun infinitive, adjective infinitive, or adverb infinitive. Tell which word the adjective, adverb, prepositional phrase, verbal, or verbal phrase modify.

If the sentence has a dependent clause, tell whether it is a noun clause, adverb clause, or adjective clause. Tell which word the adverb and adjective clause modify. Tell how the noun clause is used.

1. This is the driest year that we have had recently.

2. Jim wondered why we hadn't called him.

3. It is evident that you didn't listen.

4. I gave whoever asked the directions to the camp.

5. Texas is where the flooding occurred.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. is = verb, this = subject, year = predicate nominative, the/driest = adjectives modifying year; (that we have had recently) = adjective clause modifying year, have had = verb, we = subject, that = adjective clause introductory word equaling year used as the direct object, recently = adverb modifying have had

2. wondered = verb, Jim = subject; (why we hadn't called him) = noun clause used as the direct object, had called = verb, we = subject, him = direct object, n't = adverb modifying had called, why = noun clause introductory word used as an adverb modifying had called

3. is = verb, it = subject, evident = predicate adjective modifying it; (that you didn't listen) = adverb clause modifying the predicate adjective evident, did listen = verb, you = subject, n't = adverb modifying did listen, that = subordinate conjunction introducing the adverb clause

4. gave = verb, I = subject, directions = direct object, the = adjective modifying directions; (whoever asked) = noun clause used as the indirect object modifying gave, asked = verb, whoever = noun clause introductory word used as the subject, to the camp = adjective prepositional phrase modifying directions, to = preposition, camp = object of the preposition, the = adjective modifying camp

5. is = verb, Texas = subject; (where the flooding occurred) = noun clause used as the predicate nominative, occurred = verb, flooding = gerund used as the subject, the = adjective modifying flooding, where = noun clause introductory word used as an adverb modifying occurred

For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html. Our lessons are also available to purchase in eBook and Workbook format.

Monday, October 9, 2017

Lesson 281 - Parts of the Sentence - Clauses Review

Instructions: Using all the knowledge learned in the previous lessons, find the verb (v), subjects (subj), predicate nominatives (pn), direct objects (do), appositives (app), nouns of address (na), adjectives (adj), predicate adjectives (pa), adverbs (adv), prepositions (prep), objects of the preposition (op), prepositional phrases (p ph), indirect objects (io), and objective complements (oc) in the following sentences.

If the word is verbal, tell whether it is a gerund, participle, noun infinitive, adjective infinitive, or adverb infinitive. Tell which word the adjective, adverb, prepositional phrase, verbal, or verbal phrase modify.

If the sentence has a dependent clause, tell whether it is a noun clause, adverb clause, or adjective clause. Tell which word the adverb and adjective clause modify. Tell how the noun clause is used.

1. Becky is my daughter whom I have not seen for a year.

2. I will make a playhouse for the kids from whatever material is not used in the house.

3. Then I learned a good lesson, that you should always be kind.

4. If the price is right, we will own the car.

5. Whoever returned my wallet is an honest person.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. is =verb, Becky = subject, daughter = predicate nominative, my = adjective modifying daughter; (whom I have not seen for a year) = adjective clause modifying daughter, have seen = verb, I = subject, whom = noun clause introductory word used as a direct object, not = adverb modifying have seen, for a year = adverb prepositional phrase modifying have seen, for = preposition, year = object of the preposition, a = adjective modifying year

2. will make = verb, I = subject, playhouse = direct object, a = adjective modifying playhouse, for the kids = adverb prepositional phrase modifying will make, from whatever material is not used in the house = adverb prepositional phrase modifying will make, from = preposition; (whatever material is not used in the house) = noun clause used as the object of the preposition, is used = verb, material = subject, whatever = noun clause introductory word used as an adjective modifying material, not = adverb modifying is used, in the house = adverb prepositional phrase modifying is used, in = preposition, house = object of the preposition, the = adjective modifying house

3. learned = verb, I = subject, lesson = direct object, a, good = adjectives modifying lesson, then = adverb modifying learned; (that you should always be kind) = noun clause used as an appositive, should be = verb, you = subject, kind = predicate adjective modifying you, always = adverb modifying should be, that = clause introductory word that does not fit grammatically with the rest of the sentence. (That is the only introductory word used to introduce noun clauses that will not fit grammatically with the rest of the sentence.)

4. will own = verb, we = subject, car = direct object, the = adjective modifying car; (if the price is right) = adverb clause modifying will own, is = verb, price = subject, right = predicate adjective modifying price, the = adjective modifying price, if = subordinate conjunction introducing the adverb clause

5. is = verb, (whoever returned my wallet) = noun clause used as the subject, returned = verb, whoever = noun clause introductory word used as a subject, wallet = direct object, my = adjective modifying wallet, person = predicate nominative, an/honest = adjectives modifying person

For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html. Our lessons are also available to purchase in an eBook and a Workbook format.

Saturday, October 7, 2017

Quiz for Lessons 276 - 280 - Parts of the Sentence - Adjective, Adverb, and Noun Clauses

Instructions: Find the adjective, adverb, or noun clauses in these sentences. If it is an adjective or adverb clause, tell which word it modifies, and if it is a noun clause, tell how if it is used as the subject, predicate nominative, direct object, appositive, indirect object, or object of the preposition.

1. If the manager is unable to help, try the assistant manager.

2. The mayor is the person to whom you should write the letter.

3. The man whose neck was broken has recovered completely.

4. The scientist said that the ozone levels were dangerous.

5. The city council objected when the mayor changed his mind.

6. It is unfortunate that Mr. Jones will not return.

7. Why you don't do your work is ridiculous to me.

8. This cemetery is where your Grandfather is buried.

9. The report that the island is under water is very misleading.

10. We offered whoever told the truth clemency.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. If the manager is unable to help = adverb clause modifying the verb try

2. whom you should write the letter = noun clause used as the object of the preposition

3. whose neck was broken = adjective clause modifying the subject man

4. that the ozone levels were dangerous = noun clause used as the direct object

5. when the mayor changed his mind = adverb clause modifying the verb objected

6. that Mr. Jones will not return = adverb clause modifying the predicate adjective unfortunate

7. Why you don't do your work = noun clause used as the subject

8. where your Grandfather is buried = noun clause used as the predicate nominative

9. that the island is under water = noun clause used as the appositive

10. whoever told the truth = noun clause used as the indirect object

For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html. Our lessons are also available to purchase in an eBook and a Workbook format.

Friday, October 6, 2017

Lesson 280 - Parts of the Sentence - Adjective, Adverb, and Noun Clauses

The adjective clause is used to modify a noun or a pronoun. It will begin with a relative pronoun (who, whose, whom, which, and that) or a subordinate conjunction (when and where). Those are the only words that can be used to introduce an adjective clause. The introductory word will always rename the word that it follows and modifies except when used with a preposition which will come between the introductory word and the word it renames. Examples: The student whose hand was up gave the wrong answer. Whose hand was up is the adjective clause with whose, the relative pronoun, renaming and modifying student. Jane is a person in whom I can place my confidence. Whom I can place my confidence is the adjective clause with whom, the relative pronoun, with the preposition in between it and person the word that whom renames and
modifies.

An adverb clause is a dependent clause that modifies a verb, adjective or another adverb. It usually modifies the verb.

Adverb clauses are introduced by subordinate conjunctions including after, although, as, as if, before, because, if, since, so that, than, though, unless, until, when, where, and while. These are just some of the more common ones.

Example: They arrived before the game had ended. ("before the game had ended" is the adverb clause modifying the verb arrived telling when.)

A noun clause is a dependent clause that can be used the same ways as a noun or pronoun. It can be a subject, predicate nominative, direct object, appositive, indirect object, or object of the preposition. Some of the words that introduce noun clauses are that, whether, who, why, whom, what, how, when, whoever, where, and whomever. Notice that some of these words also introduce adjective and adverb clauses. (To check a noun clause substitute the pronoun it or the proper form of the pronouns he or she for the noun clause.) Examples: I know who said that. (I know it.) Whoever said it is wrong. (He is wrong.) Sometimes a noun clause is used without the introductory word. Example: I know that he is here. (I know he is here.)

Instructions: Find the adjective, adverb or noun clauses in these sentences. If it is an adjective or adverb clause, tell which word it modifies, and if it is a noun clause, tell if it is used as the subject, predicate nominative, direct object, appositive, indirect object, or object of the preposition.

1. This year was the warmest year that we have had.

2. We waited for hours until we received word of his rescue.

3. The hiker whom I saw on Mount Timpanogos was eighty years old.

4. Mike thinks that he will win the lottery.

5. Who lost this wallet is a mystery to me.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. that we have had = adjective clause modifying the predicate nominative year

2. until we received word of his rescue = adverb clause modifying the verb waited

3. whom I saw on Mount Timpanogos = adjective clause modifying the subject hiker

4. that he will win the lottery = noun clause used as the direct object

5. Who lost this wallet = noun clause used as the subject

For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html. Our lessons are also available to purchase in eBook and Workbook format.

Thursday, October 5, 2017

Lesson 279 - Parts of the Sentence - Adjective, Adverb, and Noun Clauses

The adjective clause is used to modify a noun or a pronoun. It will begin with a relative pronoun (who, whose, whom, which, and that) or a subordinate conjunction (when and where). Those are the only words that can be used to introduce an adjective clause. The introductory word will always rename the word that it follows and modifies except when used with a preposition which will come between the introductory word and the word it renames. Examples: The student whose hand was up gave the wrong answer. Whose hand was up is the adjective clause with whose, the relative pronoun, renaming and modifying student. Jane is a person in whom I can place my confidence. Whom I can place my confidence is the adjective clause with whom, the relative pronoun, with the preposition in between it and person the word that whom renames and modifies.

An adverb clause is a dependent clause that modifies a verb, adjective or another adverb. It usually modifies the verb.

Adverb clauses are introduced by subordinate conjunctions including after, although, as, as if, before, because, if, since, so that, than, though, unless, until, when, where, and while. These are just some of the more common ones.

Example: They arrived before the game had ended. ("before the game had ended" is the adverb clause modifying the verb arrived telling when.)

A noun clause is a dependent clause that can be used the same ways as a noun or pronoun. It can be a subject, predicate nominative, direct object, appositive, indirect object, or object of the preposition. Some of the words that introduce noun clauses are that, whether, who, why, whom, what, how, when, whoever, where, and whomever. Notice that some of these words also introduce adjective and adverb clauses. (To check a noun clause substitute the pronoun it or the proper form of the pronouns he or she for the noun clause.) Examples: I know who said that. (I know it.) Whoever said it is wrong. (He is wrong.) Sometimes a noun clause is used without the introductory word. Example: I know that he is here. (I know he is here.)

Instructions: Find the adjective, adverb or noun clauses in these sentences. If it is an adjective or adverb clause, tell which word it modifies, and if it is a noun clause, tell if it is used as the subject, predicate nominative, direct object, appositive, indirect object, or object of the preposition.

1. That the tiger was gentle and tame was not certain.

2. Do not use that comb which has no teeth.

3. If the treaty is signed, the President will leave at once.

4. Patty explained how embalming is done.

5. Jack asked why the game had been canceled.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. That the tiger was gentle and tame = noun clause used as the subject

2. which has no teeth = adjective clause modifying the direct object comb

3. If the treaty is signed = adverb clause modifying the verb will leave

4. how embalming is done = noun clause used as the direct object

5. why the game had been canceled = noun clause used as the direct object

For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html. Our lessons are also available to purchase in an eBook and a Workbook format.

Wednesday, October 4, 2017

Lesson 278 - Parts of the Sentence - Adjective, Adverb, and Noun Clauses

The adjective clause is used to modify a noun or a pronoun. It will begin with a relative pronoun (who, whose, whom, which, and that) or a subordinate conjunction (when and where). Those are the only words that can be used to introduce an adjective clause. The introductory word will always rename the word that it follows and modifies except when used with a preposition which will come between the introductory word and the word it renames. Examples: The student whose hand was up gave the wrong answer. Whose hand was up is the adjective clause with whose, the relative pronoun, renaming and modifying student. Jane is a person in whom I can place my confidence. Whom I can place my confidence is the adjective clause with whom, the relative pronoun, with the preposition in between it and person the word that whom renames and modifies.

An adverb clause is a dependent clause that modifies a verb, adjective or another adverb. It usually modifies the verb.

Adverb clauses are introduced by subordinate conjunctions including after, although, as, as if, before, because, if, since, so that, than, though, unless, until, when, where, and while. These are just some of the more common ones.

Example: They arrived before the game had ended. ("before the game had ended" is the adverb clause modifying the verb arrived telling when.)

A noun clause is a dependent clause that can be used the same ways as a noun or pronoun. It can be a subject, predicate nominative, direct object, appositive, indirect object, or object of the preposition. Some of the words that introduce noun clauses are that, whether, who, why, whom, what, how, when, whoever, where, and whomever. Notice that some of these words also introduce adjective and adverb clauses. (To check a noun clause substitute the pronoun it or the proper form of the pronouns he or she for the noun clause.) Examples: I know who said that. (I know it.) Whoever said it is wrong. (He is wrong.) Sometimes a noun clause is used without the introductory word. Example: I know that he is here. (I know he is here.)

Instructions: Find the adjective, adverb or noun clauses in these sentences. If it is an adjective or adverb clause, tell which word it modifies, and if it is a noun clause, tell if it is used as the subject, predicate nominative, direct object, appositive, indirect object, or object of the preposition.

1. Then I learned the truth, that I had been cheated.

2. The trick that he played on me was not funny.

3. He hopes that he can learn to ski.

4. It is obvious that you want no help.

5. The truth is that freedom is not free.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. that I had been cheated = noun clause used as the appositive

2. that he played on me = adjective clause modifying the subject trick

3. that he can learn to ski = noun clause used as the direct object

4. that you want no help = adverb clause modifying the predicate adjective obvious

5. that freedom is not free = noun clause used as the predicate nominative

For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html. Our lessons are also available to purchase in an eBook and a Workbook format.

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