Tuesday, January 17, 2017

Lesson 107 - Parts of the Sentence - Direct Object

A direct object receives the action performed by the subject. The verb used with a direct object is always an action verb. Another way of saying it is that the subject does the verb to the direct object. Example: The car hit the tree. To find the direct object, say the subject and verb followed by whom or what. The car hit whom or what? Tree answers the question so tree is the direct object.

If nothing answers the question whom or what, you know that there is no direct object. Example: The car sped past. The car sped whom or what? Nothing answers the question so the sentence has no direct object.

The direct object must be a noun or pronoun. A direct object will never be in a prepositional phrase. The direct object will not equal the subject as the predicate nominative, nor does it have a linking verb as a predicate nominative sentences does.

Direct objects may be compound. Example: The car hit the tree and the fence. The car hit whom or what? Tree and fence answer the question so tree and fence are the direct objects.

Instructions: Find the subjects, verbs, and direct objects in these sentences.

1. The students of these lessons have studied subjects and verbs.

2. The hungry man ate cake, pie and rolls continually.

3. John wants a bicycle and a wagon for Christmas.

4. Everyone at the party enjoyed the hamburgers, hot dogs, potato chips and drinks.

5. Grandma left her umbrella and coat at our house.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. students = subject / have studied = verb / subjects, verbs = direct objects

2. man = subject / ate = verb / cake, pie, rolls = direct objects

3. John = subject / wants = verb / bicycle, wagon = direct objects

4. Everyone = subject / enjoyed = verb / hamburgers, hot dogs, potato chips, drinks = direct objects

5. Grandma = subject / left = verb / umbrella, coat = direct objects

For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html. Our lessons are also available to purchase in an eBook and a Workbook format.

Monday, January 16, 2017

Lesson 106 - Parts of the Sentence - Direct Object

A direct object receives the action performed by the subject. The verb used with a direct object is always an action verb. Another way of saying it is that the subject does the verb to the direct object. Example: The car hit the tree. To find the direct object, say the subject and verb followed by whom or what. The car hit whom or what? Tree answers the question so tree is the direct object.

If nothing answers the question whom or what, you know that there is no direct object. Example: The car sped past. The car sped whom or what? Nothing answers the question so the sentence has no direct object.

The direct object must be a noun or pronoun. A direct object will never be in a prepositional phrase. The direct object will not equal the subject as the predicate nominative, nor does it have a linking verb as a predicate nominative sentences does.

Instructions: Find the subjects, verbs, and direct objects in the following sentences.

1. Paul built a doll house for Hayley.

2. The club members held a party in the park.

3. The audience cheered their favorite actors during the play.

4. Tiny children prefer short stories.

5. Terri really dialed a wrong number last night.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. Paul = subject / built = verb / house = direct object

2. members = subject / held = verb / party = direct object

3. audience = subject / cheered = verb / actors = direct object

4. children = subject / prefer = verb / stories = direct object

5. Terri = subject / dialed = verb / number = direct object

For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html. Our lessons are also available to purchase in an eBook and a Workbook format.

Saturday, January 14, 2017

Quiz for Lessons 101 - 105 - Parts of the Sentence - Predicate Nominative

Instructions: Find the subjects, verbs, and predicate nominatives in these sentences. Some may have compound subjects, verbs, or predicate nominatives. Some may not have a predicate nominative.

1. My favorite musical instruments are the radio, television, and stereo.

2. Two popular trees are the linden and the honey locust.

3. The winner will be either Jeff or Will.

4. Are those people our neighbors and friends?

5. Baseball and golf are outdoor sports.

6. I will be home tomorrow.

7. Your doctor should be a well-trained individual.

8. Jenny and Emily are close friends.

9. The grand prize was a trip to Hawaii and a cruise to Alaska.

10. Mr. Hatch is a member of congress and a song writer.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. instruments = subject, are = verb, radio, television, stereo = predicate nominatives

2. trees = subject, are = verb, linden, honey locust = predicate nominatives

3. winner = subject, will be = verb, Jeff, Will = predicate nominatives

4. people = subject, are = verb, neighbors, friends = predicate nominatives

5. baseball, golf = subjects, are = verb, sports = predicate nominative

6. I = subject, will be = verb

7. doctor = subject, should be = verb, individual = predicate nominative

8. Jenny, Emily = subject, are = verb, friends = predicate nominative

9. prize = subject, was = verb, trip, cruise = predicate nominatives

10. Mr. Hatch = subject, is = verb, member, writer = predicate nominatives

For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html. Our lessons are also available to purchase in an eBook and a Workbook format.

Friday, January 13, 2017

Lesson 105 - Parts of the Sentence - Predicate Nominative

A predicate nominative or predicate noun completes a linking verb and renames the subject. It is a complement or completer because it completes the verb. Predicate nominatives complete only linking verbs. The linking verbs include the following: the helping verbs is, am, are, was, were, be, being, and been; the sense verbs look, taste, smell, feel, and sound; and verbs like become, seem, appear, grow, continue, stay, and turn.

The verb in a sentence having a predicate nominative can always be replaced by the word equals. Examples: Mr. Johanson is a teacher. Mr. Johanson equals a teacher. Mr. Johanson is a father. Mr. Johanson equals a father. Mr. Johanson is my neighbor. Mr. Johanson equals my neighbor.

Predicate nominatives can be compound. Example: Mr. Johanson is a teacher, father, and my neighbor.

Instructions: Find the subjects, verbs, and predicate nominatives in these sentences. Some may have compound subjects, verbs, or predicate nominatives. Some may not have a predicate nominative.

1. An honest man should have been the leader of the country.

2. Curt's favorite toy is his big truck.

3. Students' favorite food must be pizza.

4. The alarm must be ringing again and again.

5. My homes have been a school house, an old apartment, and a moved-in house.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. man = subject, should have been = verb, leader = predicate nominative

2. toy = subject, is = verb, truck = predicate nominative

3. food = subject, must be = verb, pizza = predicate nominative

4. alarm = subject, must be ringing = verb

5. homes = subject, have been = verb, school house, apartment, house = predicate nominatives

For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html. Our lessons are also available to purchase in an eBook and a Workbook format.

Thursday, January 12, 2017

Lesson 104 - Parts of the Sentence - Predicate Nominative

A predicate nominative or predicate noun completes a linking verb and renames the subject. It is a complement or completer because it completes the verb. Predicate nominatives complete only linking verbs. The linking verbs include the following: the helping verbs is, am, are, was, were, be, being, and been; the sense verbs look, taste, smell, feel, and sound; and verbs like become, seem, appear, grow, continue, stay, and turn.

The verb in a sentence having a predicate nominative can always be replaced by the word equals. Examples: Mr. Johanson is a teacher. Mr. Johanson equals a teacher. Mr. Johanson is a father. Mr. Johanson equals a father. Mr. Johanson is my neighbor. Mr. Johanson equals my neighbor.

Predicate nominatives can be compound. Example: Mr. Johanson is a teacher, father, and my neighbor.

Instructions: Find the subjects, verbs, and predicate nominatives in these sentences. Some may have compound subjects, verbs, or predicate nominatives. Some may not have a predicate nominative.

1. Abbott and Costello were famous actors and a comedy team.

2. Radio and television have become old inventions and household necessities.

3. Many neglected children become really unhappy grownups.

4. The car has been here for a long time.

5. She was a model and became a movie star.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. Abbott, Costello = subjects, were = verb, actors, team = predicate nominatives

2. radio, television = subjects, have become = verb, inventions, necessities = predicate nominatives

3. children = subject, become = verb, grownups = predicate nominatives

4. car = subject, has been = verb

5. she = subject, was, became = verbs, model, movie star = predicate nominatives

For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html. Our lessons are also available to purchase in an eBook and a Workbook format.

Wednesday, January 11, 2017

Lesson 103 - Parts of the Sentence - Predicate Nominative

A predicate nominative or predicate noun completes a linking verb and renames the subject. It is a complement or completer because it completes the verb. Predicate nominatives complete only linking verbs. The linking verbs include the following: the helping verbs is, am, are, was, were, be, being, and been; the sense verbs look, taste, smell, feel, and sound; and verbs like become, seem, appear, grow, continue, stay, and turn.

The verb in a sentence having a predicate nominative can always be replaced by the word equals. Examples: Mr. Johanson is a teacher. Mr. Johanson equals a teacher. Mr. Johanson is a father. Mr. Johanson equals a father. Mr. Johanson is my neighbor. Mr. Johanson equals my neighbor.

Predicate nominatives can be compound. Example: Mr. Johanson is a teacher, father, and my neighbor.

Instructions: Find the subjects, verbs, and predicate nominatives in these sentences. Some may have compound subjects, verbs, or predicate nominatives.

1. One traitor and enemy to his country was Benedict Arnold.

2. Two loved Presidents were Lincoln and Washington.

3. A ruby is a beautiful stone.

4. The roads in the mountains can be long dusty trails.

5. The location to the mine was and still is a secret.


--For answers scroll down.












Answers:

1. traitor, enemy = subjects, was = verb, Benedict Arnold = predicate nominative

2. Presidents = subject, were = verb, Lincoln, Washington = predicate nominatives

3. ruby = subject, is = verb, stone = predicate nominative

4. roads = subject, can be = verb, trails = predicate nominatives

5. location = subject, was, is = verbs, secret = predicate nominatives

For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html. Our lessons are also available to purchase in an eBook and a Workbook format.

Tuesday, January 10, 2017

Lesson 102 - Parts of the Sentence - Predicate Nominative

A predicate nominative or predicate noun completes a linking verb and renames the subject. It is a complement or completer because it completes the verb. Predicate nominatives complete only linking verbs. The linking verbs include the following: the helping verbs is, am, are, was, were, be, being, and been; the sense verbs look, taste, smell, feel, and sound; and verbs like become, seem, appear, grow, continue, stay, and turn.

The verb in a sentence having a predicate nominative can always be replaced by the word equals. Examples: Mr. Johanson is a teacher. Mr. Johanson equals a teacher. Mr. Johanson is a father. Mr. Johanson equals a father. Mr. Johanson is my neighbor. Mr. Johanson equals my neighbor.

Predicate nominatives can be compound. Example: Mr. Johanson is a teacher, father, and my neighbor.

Instructions: List the subject, verb, and predicate nominatives in the following sentences.

1. My favorite pets were a squirrel and a rabbit.

2. Our chief crops are corn, wheat, and hay.

3. Mr. Jones is an accountant and a big game hunter.

4. The owners of the race car include Bill, Pete, and Sam.

5. My favorite holidays are Christmas and Easter.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. pets = subject, were = verb, squirrel, rabbit = predicate nominatives

2. crops = subject, are = verb, corn, wheat, hay = predicate nominatives

3. Mr. Jones = subject, is = verb, accountant, hunter = predicate nominatives

4. owners = subject, include = verb, Bill, Pete, Sam = predicate nominatives

5. holidays = subject, are = verb, Christmas, Easter = predicate nominatives

For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html. Our lessons are also available to purchase in an eBook and a Workbook format.

Monday, January 9, 2017

Lesson 101 - Parts of the Sentence - Predicate Nominative

A predicate nominative or predicate noun completes a linking verb and renames the subject. It is a complement or completer because it completes the verb. Predicate nominatives complete only linking verbs. The linking verbs include the following: the helping verbs is, am, are, was, were, be, being, and been; the sense verbs look, taste, smell, feel, and sound; and verbs like become, seem, appear, grow, continue, stay, and turn.

The verb in a sentence having a predicate nominative can always be replaced by the word equals. Examples: Mr. Johanson is a teacher. Mr. Johanson equals a teacher. Mr. Johanson is a father. Mr. Johanson equals a father. Mr. Johanson is my neighbor. Mr. Johanson equals my neighbor.

Instructions: Find the verb, subject, and predicate nominatives in these sentences.

1. Ann is a new mother.

2. The black dog in the yard was a large Doberman.

3. The tall boy has been our best basketball player.

4. My uncle became a rich computer expert.

5. Mr. Bush may be our next President.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. Ann = subject, is = verb, mother = predicate nominative

2. dog = subject, was = verb, Doberman = predicate nominative

3. boy = subject, has been = verb, player = predicate nominative

4. uncle = subject, became = verb, expert = predicate nominative

5. Mr. Bush = subject, may be = verb, president = predicate nominative

For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html. Our lessons are also available to purchase in an eBook and a Workbook format.

Saturday, January 7, 2017

Quiz for Lessons 96-100 - Parts of the Sentence - Subject/Verb

Instructions: Find the subjects, verbs, interjections, introductory there, and conjunctions in the following sentences. Remember that subjects and verbs can be compound.

1. There were no pies, cakes or cookies on the shelves.

2. Oh, neither Jane nor Tarzan would return to civilization.

3. Barbara and her friends sat on the floor, ate goodies, and listened to records.

4. The brothers swam, fished, and rowed the boat on their vacation.

5. Wow, this lesson is hard but was fun.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. pies, cakes, cookies - subjects; were - verb; there - introductory; or - conjunction

2. Jane, Tarzan - subjects; would return - verb; oh - interjection; neither, nor - conjunction

3. Barbara, friends - subjects; sat, ate, listened - verbs; and, and - conjunctions

4. brothers - subject; swam, fished, rowed - verbs; and - conjunction

5. lesson - subject; is, was - verbs; wow - interjection; but - conjunction

For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html. Our lessons are also available to purchase in an eBook and a Workbook format.

Friday, January 6, 2017

Lesson 100 - Parts of the Sentence - Subject/Verb

Both the subject and the verb can be compound. Example: The bell and the siren rang and rang.

Instructions: Find the subject, verb, and conjunctions in these sentences.

1. The boys and the girls ran and played in the field.

2. She and I stopped and stared at the sight.

3. Both the team and the coach jumped up and yelled with the last out.

4. Jeff, Jed, and Jim will be in school or will be home in bed.

5. Where have Jay and Eric been swimming and hiking?


--For answers scroll down.












Answers:

1. Boys, girls - subjects; ran, played - verbs; and, and - conjunctions

2. She, I - subjects; stopped, stared - verbs; and, and - conjunctions

3. team, coach - subjects; jumped, yelled - verbs; both, and, and - conjunctions

4. Jeff, Jed, Jim - subjects; will be, will be - verbs; and, or - conjunctions

5. Jay, Eric - subjects; have been swimming, (have been) hiking - verbs; and, and - conjunctions

For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html. Our lessons are also available to purchase in an eBook and a Workbook format.

Thursday, January 5, 2017

Lesson 99 - Parts of the Sentence - Subject/Verb

The subject of the sentence can also be compound. Example: The bell and siren rang.

Instructions: Find the subject, verb, and conjunctions in these sentences.

1. Barbara, Ann, and Jeanne came home for the holidays.

2. Either Jim or Jeff will move to the new apartment.

3. Both Pam and her husband love the new baby.

4. You, Joe, and I are in the new play.

5. Mom or Dad will be gone by morning.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. Barbara, Ann, Jeanne - subjects; came - verb; and - conjunction

2. Jim, Jeff - subjects; will move - verb; either, or - conjunctions

3. Pam, husband -subjects; love - verb; both, and - conjunctions

4. you, Joe, I - subjects; are - verb; and - conjunction

5. Mom, Dad - subjects; will be gone - verb; or - conjunction

For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html. Our lessons are also available to purchase in an eBook and a Workbook format.

Wednesday, January 4, 2017

Lesson 98 - Parts of the Sentence - Subject/Verb

Sometimes a sentence can have two or more verbs called a compound verb. A compound verb is joined by either a co-ordinate conjunction or a correlative conjunction. Example: The bell rang and rang.

Instructions: Find the subject, verb/verbs, and conjunctions in these sentences.

1. Carl listened carefully but heard nothing.

2. The car raced down the road and hit a tree.

3. The audience stood and cheered the performance.

4. The men caught, cooked, and ate the fish.

5. Sue either has done the job or will do it now.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. Carl - subject; listened, heard - verbs; but - conjunction

2. car - subject; raced, hit - verbs; and - conjunction

3. audience - subject; stood, cheered - verbs; and - conjunction

4. men - subject; caught, cooked, ate - verbs; and - conjunction

5. Sue - subject; has done, will do - verbs; either, or - conjunction

For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html. Our lessons are also available to purchase in an eBook and a Workbook format.

Tuesday, January 3, 2017

Lesson 97 - Parts of the Sentence - Subject/Verb

Interjections, like the introductory there, do not fit grammatically with the rest of the sentence. They are never the subject. They come at the beginning of a sentence and may be set off with a comma. Example: Oh, I like your new car.

Instructions: Find the subject, verb, and interjections in these sentences.

1. Hey, what are you doing over there?

2. Yes, I would like that very much.

3. Well, Joe did it.

4. Yippee! Our team won the game.

5. Gosh, how did you do that?


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. you - subject, are doing - verb, hey - interjection

2. I - subject, would like - verb, yes - interjection

3. Joe - subject, did - verb, well - interjection

4. team - subject, won - verb, yippee - interjection

5. you - subject, did do - verb, gosh - interjection

For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html. Our lessons are also available to purchase in an eBook and a Workbook format.

Monday, January 2, 2017

Lesson 96 - Parts of the Sentence - Subject/Verb

A simple sentence is a group of words expressing a complete thought, and it must have a subject and a verb (predicate - some grammar books use the word predicate, but I will use verb). A verb shows action or state of being. Examples: The bell rang. The boy is here. The subject tells who or what about the verb. Examples: The bell rang. The boy is here.

There are four (4) kinds of sentences: declarative, imperative, interrogative, and exclamatory.

1. A declarative sentence makes a statement. Example: The assignment is due tomorrow.

2. An imperative sentence gives a command or makes a request. Examples: Hand it in now.

3. An interrogative sentence asks a question. Example: Do you know the man?

4. An exclamatory sentence shows strong feeling. Declarative, imperative, or interrogative sentences can be made into exclamatory sentences by punctuating them with an exclamation point. Examples: The assignment is due tomorrow! Stop! Do you know the man!

When finding the subject and the verb in a sentence, always find the verb first and then say who or what followed by the verb. Example: The bell rang. Find the verb - rang. Now say who or what rang? The bell rang. Bell is the subject.

Some sentences begin with an introductory there. It is never the subject. The subject will always come after the verb in such a sentence. There can also be an adverb. To be an introductory there, it must meet these rules: It must be the first word of a sentence (Sometimes a prepositional phrase out of its normal order can come before it.); It cannot mean where; It must be with a state of being verb. The introductory there doesn't fit grammatically with the rest of the sentence as we will find most other words do. Examples: There is some food in the refrigerator. Is is the verb. Who or what is? Food is. Food is the subject. In the refrigerator there is some food. Moving the prepositional phrase does not change the introductory there.


Instructions: Find the subject and verb in these sentences.

1. There may not be time for an encore.

2. In the mail box, there was no mail.

3. There has been no letter today.

4. There weren't many men at the meeting.

5. In the snow there were many tracks.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. time - subject, may be - verb

2. mail - subject, was - verb

3. letter- subject, has been - verb

4. men - subject, were - verb

5. tracks - subject, were - verb

For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html. Our lessons are also available to purchase in an eBook and a Workbook format.

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