Friday, January 15, 2021

Lesson 110 - Parts of the Sentence - Direct Object

View lesson on Daily Grammar
 
A direct object receives the action performed by the subject. The verb used with a direct object is always an action verb. Another way of saying it is that the subject does the verb to the direct object. 
 
To find the direct object, say the subject and verb followed by whom or what. If nothing answers the question whom or what, you know that there is no direct object.
 
     Example: 
     The car hit the tree. 
     The car hit whom or what? 
     Tree answers the question, so tree is the direct object.
     The car hit the tree

     Example: 
     The car sped past.
     The car sped whom or what?
     Nothing answers the question, so the sentence has no direct object.

The direct object must be a noun or pronoun. A direct object will never be in a prepositional phrase. The direct object will not equal the subject as the predicate nominative, nor does it have a linking verb as a predicate nominative sentences does.

Direct objects may be compound. 

     Example:
     The car hit the tree and the fence.
     The car hit whom or what?
     Tree and fence answer the question, so tree and fence are the direct objects.
     The car hit the tree and the fence.

A sentence may have a compound verb with one direct object for both verbs. 

     Example: 
     The man mowed and raked the lawn
     The lawn received the action of being both mowed and raked by the man.
 
A sentence with a compound verb may have two different direct objects in it. 
 
     Example: 
     The dog ate the meat and drank some water
     The direct object for the verb ate is meat. 
     The direct object for the verb drank is water
     The dog didn't drink the meat or eat the water.

Instructions: Find the subjects, verbs, direct objects, and predicate nominatives in these sentences. They may be sentences with direct objects, compound verbs with separate direct objects, predicate nominatives, or without either a direct object or predicate nominative.

1. Jeanne was the chairperson of the dance committee.

2. The boys at the park played tag and ran races.

3. The baker cut and wrapped the bread.

4. The large round spaceship rose over the quiet city.

5. Jeff and Carl speak the same language.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. Jeanne = subject / was = verb / chairperson = predicate nominative

2. boys = subject / played = verb / tag = direct object // ran = verb / races = direct object

3. baker = subject / cut, wrapped = verbs / bread = direct object

4. spaceship = subject / rose = verb / (There is no predicate nominative or direct object.)

5. Jeff, Carl = subjects / speak = verb / language = direct object


For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html.

Thursday, January 14, 2021

Lesson 109 - Parts of the Sentence - Direct Object

View lesson on Daily Grammar
 
A direct object receives the action performed by the subject. The verb used with a direct object is always an action verb. Another way of saying it is that the subject does the verb to the direct object. 
 
To find the direct object, say the subject and verb followed by whom or what. If nothing answers the question whom or what, you know that there is no direct object.
 
     Example: 
     The car hit the tree. 
     The car hit whom or what? 
     Tree answers the question, so tree is the direct object.
     The car hit the tree

     Example: 
     The car sped past.
     The car sped whom or what?
     Nothing answers the question, so the sentence has no direct object.

The direct object must be a noun or pronoun. A direct object will never be in a prepositional phrase. The direct object will not equal the subject as the predicate nominative, nor does it have a linking verb as a predicate nominative sentences does.

Direct objects may be compound. 

     Example:
     The car hit the tree and the fence.
     The car hit whom or what?
     Tree and fence answer the question, so tree and fence are the direct objects.
     The car hit the tree and the fence.

A sentence may have a compound verb with one direct object for both verbs. 

     Example: 
     The man mowed and raked the lawn
     The lawn received the action of being both mowed and raked by the man.
 
A sentence with a compound verb may have two different direct objects in it. 
 
     Example: 
     The dog ate the meat and drank some water
     The direct object for the verb ate is meat. 
     The direct object for the verb drank is water
     The dog didn't drink the meat or eat the water.

Instructions: Find the subjects, verbs, and direct objects in these sentences.

1. The football player changed his clothes and took a shower.

2. The speaker read his speech and answered some questions.

3. The carpenter fixed the door and painted the house.

4. The little girl played the piano and sang a song.

5. My neighbor mowed his lawn and watered the flowers.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. player = subject / changed = verb / clothes = direct object // took = verb / shower = direct object

2. speaker = subject / read = verb / speech = direct object // answered = verb / questions = direct object

3. carpenter = subject / fixed = verb / door = direct object // painted = verb / house = direct object

4. girl = subject / played = verb / piano = direct object // sang = verb / song = direct object

5. neighbor= subject / mowed = verb / lawn = direct object // watered = verb / flowers = direct object


For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html.

Wednesday, January 13, 2021

Lesson 108 - Parts of the Sentence - Direct Object

View lesson on Daily Grammar
 
A direct object receives the action performed by the subject. The verb used with a direct object is always an action verb. Another way of saying it is that the subject does the verb to the direct object. 
 
To find the direct object, say the subject and verb followed by whom or what. If nothing answers the question whom or what, you know that there is no direct object.
 
     Example: 
     The car hit the tree. 
     The car hit whom or what? 
     Tree answers the question, so tree is the direct object.
     The car hit the tree

     Example: 
     The car sped past.
     The car sped whom or what?
     Nothing answers the question, so the sentence has no direct object.

The direct object must be a noun or pronoun. A direct object will never be in a prepositional phrase. The direct object will not equal the subject as the predicate nominative, nor does it have a linking verb as a predicate nominative sentences does.

Direct objects may be compound. 

     Example:
     The car hit the tree and the fence.
     The car hit whom or what?
     Tree and fence answer the question, so tree and fence are the direct objects.
     The car hit the tree and the fence.

A sentence may have a compound verb with one direct object for both verbs. 

     Example: 
     The man mowed and raked the lawn
     The lawn received the action of being both mowed and raked by the man.

Instructions: Find the subjects, verbs, and direct objects in these sentences.

1. The worker sanded and painted the bookcase.

2. The cat chased and caught the mouse.

3. Mike wrapped and sent the package.

4. Mother cooked and served the meal to everyone at the party.

5. The cowboy rode and broke the wild horse.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. The worker sanded and painted the bookcase.

2. The cat chased and caught the mouse.

3. Mike wrapped and sent the package.

4. Mother cooked and served the meal to everyone at the party.

5. The cowboy rode and broke the wild horse.


For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html.

Tuesday, January 12, 2021

Lesson 107 - Parts of the Sentence - Direct Object

View lesson on Daily Grammar
 
A direct object receives the action performed by the subject. The verb used with a direct object is always an action verb. Another way of saying it is that the subject does the verb to the direct object. 
 
To find the direct object, say the subject and verb followed by whom or what. If nothing answers the question whom or what, you know that there is no direct object.
 
     Example: 
     The car hit the tree. 
     The car hit whom or what? 
     Tree answers the question, so tree is the direct object.
     The car hit the tree

     Example: 
     The car sped past.
     The car sped whom or what?
     Nothing answers the question, so the sentence has no direct object.

The direct object must be a noun or pronoun. A direct object will never be in a prepositional phrase. The direct object will not equal the subject as the predicate nominative, nor does it have a linking verb as a predicate nominative sentences does.

Direct objects may be compound. 
 
     Example: 
     The car hit the tree and the fence. 
     The car hit whom or what?  
     Tree and fence answer the question, so tree and fence are the direct objects.
     The car hit the tree and the fence.

Instructions: Find the subjects, verbs, and direct objects in these sentences.

1. The students of these lessons have studied subjects and verbs.

2. The hungry man ate cake, pie and rolls continually.

3. John wants a bicycle and a wagon for Christmas.

4. Everyone at the party enjoyed the hamburgers, hot dogs, potato chips and drinks.

5. Grandma left her umbrella and coat at our house.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. students = subject / have studied = verb / subjects, verbs = direct objects

2. man = subject / ate = verb / cake, pie, rolls = direct objects

3. John = subject / wants = verb / bicycle, wagon = direct objects

4. Everyone = subject / enjoyed = verb / hamburgers, hot dogs, potato chips, drinks = direct objects

5. Grandma = subject / left = verb / umbrella, coat = direct objects


For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html.

Monday, January 11, 2021

Lesson 106 - Parts of the Sentence - Direct Object

View lesson on Daily Grammar

A direct object receives the action performed by the subject. The verb used with a direct object is always an action verb. Another way of saying it is that the subject does the verb to the direct object. 
 
To find the direct object, say the subject and verb followed by whom or what. If nothing answers the question whom or what, you know that there is no direct object.
 
     Example: 
     The car hit the tree. 
     The car hit whom or what? 
     Tree answers the question, so tree is the direct object.
     The car hit the tree

     Example: 
     The car sped past.
     The car sped whom or what?
     Nothing answers the question so the sentence has no direct object.

The direct object must be a noun or pronoun. A direct object will never be in a prepositional phrase. The direct object will not equal the subject as the predicate nominative, nor does it have a linking verb as a predicate nominative sentences does.

Instructions: Find the subjects, verbs, and direct objects in the following sentences.

1. Paul built a doll house for Hayley.

2. The club members held a party in the park.

3. The audience cheered their favorite actors during the play.

4. Tiny children prefer short stories.

5. Terri really dialed a wrong number last night.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. Paul built a doll house for Hayley.

2. The club members held a party in the park.

3. The audience cheered their favorite actors during the play.

4. Tiny children prefer short stories.

5. Terri really dialed a wrong number last night.
 

For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html.

Saturday, January 9, 2021

Quiz for Lessons 101 - 105 - Parts of the Sentence - Predicate Nominative

View quiz on Daily Grammar

Instructions: Find the subjects, verbs, and predicate nominatives in these sentences. Some may have compound subjects, verbs, or predicate nominatives. Some may not have a predicate nominative.

1. My favorite musical instruments are the radio, television, and stereo.

2. Two popular trees are the linden and the honey locust.

3. The winner will be either Jeff or Will.

4. Are those people our neighbors and friends?

5. Baseball and golf are outdoor sports.

6. I will be home tomorrow.

7. Your doctor should be a well-trained individual.

8. Jenny and Emily are close friends.

9. The grand prize was a trip to Hawaii and a cruise to Alaska.

10. Mr. Hatch is a member of congress and a song writer.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. My favorite musical instruments are the radio, television, and stereo.

2. Two popular trees are the linden and the honey locust.

3. The winner will be either Jeff or Will.

4. Are those people our neighbors and friends?

5. Baseball and golf are outdoor sports.
 
6. I will be home tomorrow.

7. Your doctor should be a well-trained individual.

8. Jenny and Emily are close friends.

9. The grand prize was a trip to Hawaii and a cruise to Alaska.

10. Mr. Hatch is a member of congress and a song writer.
 


For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html.

Friday, January 8, 2021

Lesson 105 - Parts of the Sentence - Predicate Nominative

View lesson on Daily Grammar

A predicate nominative or predicate noun completes a linking verb and renames the subject.  It is a complement or completer because it completes the verb.  The verb in a sentence having a predicate nominative can always be replaced by the word equals.

     Examples:
     Mr. Johanson is a teacher.
     Mr. Johanson equals a teacher.
     Mr. Johanson is a father.
     Mr. Johanson equals a father.
     Mr. Johanson is my neighbor.
     Mr. Johanson equals my neighbor.

Predicate nominatives complete only linking verbs. The linking verbs include the following: the helping verbs is, am, are, was, were, be, being, and been; the sense verbs look, taste, smell, feel, and sound; and verbs like become, seem, appear, grow, continue, stay, and turn.

Predicate nominatives can be compound. 
 
     Example: 
     Mr. Johanson is a teacher, father, and my neighbor.

Instructions: List the subject, verb, and predicate nominatives in the following sentences. Some may have compound subjects, verbs, or predicate nominatives. Some may not have a predicate nominative.

1. An honest man should have been the leader of the country.

2. Curt's favorite toy is his big truck.

3. Students' favorite food must be pizza.

4. The alarm must be ringing again and again.

5. My homes have been a school house, an old apartment, and a moved-in house.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. An honest man should have been the leader of the country.

2. Curt's favorite toy is his big truck.

3. Students' favorite food must be pizza.

4. The alarm must be ringing again and again.

5. My homes have been a school house, an old apartment, and a moved-in house.
 


For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html.

Thursday, January 7, 2021

Lesson 104 - Parts of the Sentence - Predicate Nominative

View lesson on Daily Grammar

A predicate nominative or predicate noun completes a linking verb and renames the subject.  It is a complement or completer because it completes the verb.  The verb in a sentence having a predicate nominative can always be replaced by the word equals.

     Examples:
     Mr. Johanson is a teacher.
     Mr. Johanson equals a teacher.
     Mr. Johanson is a father.
     Mr. Johanson equals a father.
     Mr. Johanson is my neighbor.
     Mr. Johanson equals my neighbor.

Predicate nominatives complete only linking verbs. The linking verbs include the following: the helping verbs is, am, are, was, were, be, being, and been; the sense verbs look, taste, smell, feel, and sound; and verbs like become, seem, appear, grow, continue, stay, and turn.

Predicate nominatives can be compound. 
 
     Example: 
     Mr. Johanson is a teacher, father, and my neighbor.

Instructions: List the subject, verb, and predicate nominatives in the following sentences. Some may have compound subjects, verbs, or predicate nominatives. Some may not have a predicate nominative.

1. Abbott and Costello were famous actors and a comedy team.

2. Radio and television have become old inventions and household necessities.

3. Many neglected children become really unhappy grownups.

4. The car has been here for a long time.

5. She was a model and became a movie star.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. Abbott and Costello were famous actors and a comedy team.

2. Radio and television have become old inventions and household necessities.

3. Many neglected children become really unhappy grownups.

4. The car has been here for a long time.

5. She was a model and became a movie star.
 

For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html.

Wednesday, January 6, 2021

Lesson 103 - Parts of the Sentence - Predicate Nominative

View lesson on Daily Grammar

A predicate nominative or predicate noun completes a linking verb and renames the subject.  It is a complement or completer because it completes the verb.  The verb in a sentence having a predicate nominative can always be replaced by the word equals.

     Examples:
     Mr. Johanson is a teacher.
     Mr. Johanson equals a teacher.
     Mr. Johanson is a father.
     Mr. Johanson equals a father.
     Mr. Johanson is my neighbor.
     Mr. Johanson equals my neighbor.

Predicate nominatives complete only linking verbs. The linking verbs include the following: the helping verbs is, am, are, was, were, be, being, and been; the sense verbs look, taste, smell, feel, and sound; and verbs like become, seem, appear, grow, continue, stay, and turn.

Predicate nominatives can be compound. 
 
     Example: 
     Mr. Johanson is a teacher, father, and my neighbor.

Instructions: List the subject, verb, and predicate nominatives in the following sentences. Some may have compound subjects, verbs, or predicate nominatives.

1. One traitor and enemy to his country was Benedict Arnold.

2. Two loved Presidents were Lincoln and Washington.

3. A ruby is a beautiful stone.

4. The roads in the mountains can be long dusty trails.

5. The location to the mine was and still is a secret.


--For answers scroll down.












Answers:

1. One traitor and enemy to his country was Benedict Arnold.

2. Two loved Presidents were Lincoln and Washington.

3. A ruby is a beautiful stone.

4. The roads in the mountains can be long dusty trails.

5. The location to the mine was and still is a secret.
 

For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html.

Tuesday, January 5, 2021

Lesson 102 - Parts of the Sentence - Predicate Nominative

View lesson on Daily Grammar

A predicate nominative or predicate noun completes a linking verb and renames the subject.  It is a complement or completer because it completes the verb.  The verb in a sentence having a predicate nominative can always be replaced by the word equals.

     Examples:
     Mr. Johanson is a teacher.
     Mr. Johanson equals a teacher.
     Mr. Johanson is a father.
     Mr. Johanson equals a father.
     Mr. Johanson is my neighbor.
     Mr. Johanson equals my neighbor.

Predicate nominatives complete only linking verbs. The linking verbs include the following: the helping verbs is, am, are, was, were, be, being, and been; the sense verbs look, taste, smell, feel, and sound; and verbs like become, seem, appear, grow, continue, stay, and turn.

Predicate nominatives can be compound. 
 
     Example: 
     Mr. Johanson is a teacher, father, and my neighbor.

Instructions: List the subject, verb, and predicate nominatives in the following sentences.

1. My favorite pets were a squirrel and a rabbit.

2. Our chief crops are corn, wheat, and hay.

3. Mr. Jones is an accountant and a big game hunter.

4. The owners of the race car include Bill, Pete, and Sam.

5. My favorite holidays are Christmas and Easter.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. My favorite pets were a squirrel and a rabbit.

2. Our chief crops are corn, wheat, and hay.

3. Mr. Jones is an accountant and a big game hunter.

4. The owners of the race car include Bill, Pete, and Sam.

5. My favorite holidays are Christmas and Easter.


For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html.

Monday, January 4, 2021

Lesson 101 - Parts of the Sentence - Predicate Nominative

View lesson on Daily Grammar

A predicate nominative or predicate noun completes a linking verb and renames the subject.  It is a complement or completer because it completes the verb.  The verb in a sentence having a predicate nominative can always be replaced by the word equals.

     Examples:
     Mr. Johanson is a teacher.
     Mr. Johanson equals a teacher.
     Mr. Johanson is a father.
     Mr. Johanson equals a father.
     Mr. Johanson is my neighbor.
     Mr. Johanson equals my neighbor.

Predicate nominatives complete only linking verbs. The linking verbs include the following: the helping verbs is, am, are, was, were, be, being, and been; the sense verbs look, taste, smell, feel, and sound; and verbs like become, seem, appear, grow, continue, stay, and turn. 

Instructions: Find the verb, subject, and predicate nominatives in these sentences.

1. Ann is a new mother.

2. The black dog in the yard was a large Doberman.

3. The tall boy has been our best basketball player.

4. My uncle became a rich computer expert.

5. Mr. Bush may be our next President.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. Ann is a new mother.

2. The black dog in the yard was a large Doberman.

3. The tall boy has been our best basketball player.

4. My uncle became a rich computer expert.

5. Mr. Bush may be our next President.
 

For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html.

Saturday, January 2, 2021

Quiz for Lessons 96-100 - Parts of the Sentence - Subject/Verb

View lesson on Daily Grammar

Instructions: Find the subjects, verbs, interjections, introductory there, and conjunctions in the following sentences. Remember that subjects and verbs can be compound.

1. There were no pies, cakes, or cookies on the shelves.

2. Oh, neither Jane nor Tarzan would return to civilization.

3. Barbara and her friends sat on the floor, ate goodies, and listened to records.

4. The brothers swam, fished, and rowed the boat on their vacation.

5. Wow, this lesson is hard but was fun.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. There were no pies, cakes, or cookies on the shelves.

2. Oh, neither Jane nor Tarzan would return to civilization.

3. Barbara and her friends sat on the floor, ate goodies, and listened to records.

4. The brothers swam, fished, and rowed the boat on their vacation.

5. Wow, this lesson is hard but was fun.


For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html.

Friday, January 1, 2021

Lesson 100 - Parts of the Sentence - Subject/Verb

View lesson on Daily Grammar

Both the subject and the verb can be compound. Both compound subjects and compound verbs are joined by either a co-ordinate conjunction or a correlative conjunction.
 
     Example: 
     The bell and the siren rang and rang.

Instructions: Find the subject, verb, and conjunctions in these sentences.

1. The boys and the girls ran and played in the field.

2. She and I stopped and stared at the sight.

3. Both the team and the coach jumped up and yelled with the last out.

4. Jeff, Jed, and Jim will be in school or will be home in bed.

5. Where have Jay and Eric been swimming and hiking?


--For answers scroll down.












Answers:

1. The boys and the girls ran and played in the field.

2. She and I stopped and stared at the sight.

3. Both the team and the coach jumped up and yelled with the last out.

4. Jeff, Jed, and Jim will be in school or will be home in bed.

5. Where have Jay and Eric been swimming and hiking?


For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html.