Thursday, December 18, 2014

Lesson 74 - Parts of Speech - Prepositions

Instructions: Combine the sentences into one sentence using prepositional phrases. Example: The band marched. They marched across the football field. The band marched across the football field.

1. The runner jogged. He jogged around the park.

2. I found my money. It was under the mattress.

3. She looked around. She was in the store.

4. The students performed well. The performance was for the school play.

5. The man walked home. He was walking from work.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. The runner jogged around the park. or Around the park the runner jogged.

2. I found my money under the mattress. or Under the mattress I found my money.

3. She looked around in the store. or In the store she looked around.

4. The students performed well for the school play. or For the school play the students performed well.

5. The man walked home from work. or The man walked from work home. or From work the man walked home.

For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html. Our lessons are also available to purchase in an eBook, a FlipBook, and a Workbook format.

Wednesday, December 17, 2014

Lesson 73 - Parts of Speech - Prepositions

Instructions: Combine the two sentences into one sentence using a prepositional phrase. Example: The ice melted. The ice was in the glass. Combined: The ice in the glass melted.

1. My dog is named Badger. He is in the garden area.

2. The sunset was beautiful. The sunset was in the west.

3. The grass is dead. The grass is near the road.

4. That girl is my best friend. She lives across the street.

5. I talked to that man. He is in my club.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. My dog in the garden area is named Badger

2. The sunset in the west was beautiful.

3. The grass near the road is dead.

4. That girl across the street is my best friend.

5. I talked to that man in my club.

For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html. Our lessons are also available to purchase in an eBook, a FlipBook, and a Workbook format.

Tuesday, December 16, 2014

Lesson 72 - Parts of Speech - Prepositions

Instructions: Remembering what was taught in Lesson 71, find the prepositions in these sentences. Remember that a preposition must have an object to complete it.

1. I like the color of the curtain on the window.

2. Jane walked along in the rain during the shower.

3. Hang the picture up or set it down behind the couch.

4. Eric was shining his light around in the car beside us.

5. The bird swooped down, picked up the mouse, and landed on the fence.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. of, on - because they have objects

2. in, during

3. behind

4. in, beside

5. on - (up appears to have an object, but really it is telling how or where the bird picked the mouse. You are really saying "The bird picked the mouse up.")

For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html. Our lessons are also available to purchase in an eBook, a FlipBook, and a Workbook format.

Monday, December 15, 2014

Lesson 71 - Parts of Speech - Prepositions

A preposition is a word that begins a prepositional phrase and shows the relationship between its object and another word in the sentence. A preposition must always have an object. A prepositional phrase starts with a preposition, ends with an object, and may have modifiers between the proposition and object of the preposition.

Here is a list of common words that can be used as prepositions: about, above, across, after, against, along, among, around, at, before, behind, below, beneath, beside, besides, between, beyond, but (when it means except), by, concerning, down, during, except, for, from, in, inside, into, like, near, of, off, on, out, outside, over, past, since, through, to, toward, under, until, up, upon, with, within, and without.

These words can be used as other parts of speech. What part of speech it is depends on how it is used in that sentence. Many of the common words used as prepositions can be used as adverbs. Words are prepositions if they have an object to complete them. To decide which it is say the preposition followed by whom or what. If a noun or a pronoun answers the question, the word is a preposition.

Example: The boy stood up and ran down the street. Up what? There is no object; therefore up is not a preposition. Down what? Street answers the question; therefore, down is a preposition. Down the street is the prepositional phrase starting with the preposition down and ending with the object street with a modifier the in between.

Instructions: Find the prepositional phrases in the following sentences.

1. Jim painted a picture on the wall of the house.

2. I like to lie in the shade of the apricot tree and think of the jobs for the day.

3. The dog jumped over the mound behind the barn and ran into the street.

4. Everyone but you will need a note from home with parental permission.

5. Around the yard for miles, you could see nothing except junk.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. on the wall, of the house

2. in the shade, of the apricot tree, of the jobs, for the day

3. over the mound, behind the barn, into the street.

4. but you, from home, with parental permission

5. around the yard, for miles, except junk

For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html. Our lessons are also available to purchase in an eBook, a FlipBook, and a Workbook format.

Saturday, December 13, 2014

Quiz for Lessons 66-70 - Parts of Speech - Adverbs

Instructions: Choose the correct form for the following sentences.

1. Matthew plays tennis (bad, badly).

2. Can't you see the game (good, well)?

3. The apple tastes (bad, badly).

4. Are you (sure, surely) he will come?

5. The man felt (bad, badly) about the accident.

6. The weather has been (real, really) cold lately.

7. His death caused everyone to be (real, very) sad.

8. Do you feel (good, well)?

9. The pizza tastes (real, really) (good, well).

10. You (sure, surely) are wrong.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. badly

2. well

3. bad

4. sure

5. bad

6. really

7. very

8. well

9. really, good

10. surely

For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html. Our lessons are also available to purchase in an eBook, a FlipBook, and a Workbook format.

Friday, December 12, 2014

Lesson 70 - Parts of Speech - Adverbs

Instructions: Choose the correct form for each of these sentences. Remember that adjectives modify nouns and pronouns while adverbs modify verbs, adjectives or other adverbs.

1. Mr. Peterson always speaks (good, well).

2. That coach (sure, surely) gets results.

3. Those knives are (awful, very) sharp.

4. The bacon tasted (good, well).

5. The new teacher (sure, really) is smart.

6. Your assignment was done (bad, badly).

7. I am (real, really) sorry to hear that.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. well

2. surely

3. very

4. good

5. really

6. badly

7. really

For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html. Our lessons are also available to purchase in an eBook, a FlipBook, and a Workbook format.

Thursday, December 11, 2014

Lesson 69 - Parts of Speech - Adverbs

The adjectives real and awful should not be used for the adverbs really, very, and extremely.

Instructions: Choose the correct form for each of these sentences.

1. She is (very, real) sorry.

2. Today is (really, real) stormy.

3. Is that a (really, real) person?

4. Be sure to drive (very, real) carefully on slick roads.

5. I am (extremely, real) tired of your antics.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. very

2. really

3. real

4. very

5. extremely

For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html. Our lessons are also available to purchase in an eBook, a FlipBook, and a Workbook format.

Wednesday, December 10, 2014

Lesson 68 - Parts of Speech - Adverbs

The adverb badly is used to tell how something is done. The adjective bad is used to refer to health or feelings and to complete linking verbs such as seem, look, taste, smell.

Instructions: Choose the correct form for each of the following sentences.

1. Our football team played (bad, badly) last night.

2. John felt (bad, badly) about the loss.

3. The medicine doesn't taste too (bad, badly).

4. Our science project went (bad, badly).

5. The air in the sewer smelled (bad, badly).


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. badly

2. bad

3. bad

4. badly

5. bad

For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html. Our lessons are also available to purchase in an eBook, a FlipBook, and a Workbook format.

Tuesday, December 9, 2014

Lesson 67 - Parts of Speech - Adverbs

The adjective good should not be used for the adverb well. Well should be used for an adjective only when it refers to health or appearance.

Instructions: Choose the correct form for each of these sentences.

1. This food tastes very (good, well).

2. Ann doesn't drive very (good, well).

3. Dad writes (good, well).

4. Becky worked (good, well) today.

5. That hot sun feels (good, well).


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. good

2. well

3. well

4. well

5. good

For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html. Our lessons are also available to purchase in an eBook, a FlipBook, and a Workbook format.

Monday, December 8, 2014

Lesson 66 - Parts of Speech - Adverbs

People often confuse the use of some adverbs and adjectives. The next few lessons will cover some common mistakes. Remember that adjectives modify nouns or pronouns. Adverbs modify verbs, adjectives, or other adverbs.

This lesson will be about the use of the adjective sure and the adverbs surely, certainly, and really. Use sure only when one of these three adverbs does not make sense.

Examples: Jim is sure he is right. Surely he is right.

Instructions: Choose the correct form for each of these sentences.

1. You seem very (surely, sure) of yourself.

2. Ila (surely, sure) is tired from work.

3. The milk (surely, sure) tastes sour.

4. Are you (surely, sure) this is the right road?

5. This story (surely, sure) is exciting.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. sure

2. surely

3. surely

4. sure

5. surely

(Each answer in which you used surely could be substituted with the other adverbs really and certainly and still make sense.)

For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html. Our lessons are also available to purchase in an eBook, a FlipBook, and a Workbook format.

Saturday, December 6, 2014

Quiz for Lessons 61-65 - Parts of Speech - Adverbs

Instructions: Find the adverbs and tell what they modify in the following sentences.

1. After the hike my muscles were extremely tired and very sore.

2. Yesterday I had hardly completed my very hard assignment when I was rudely interrupted.

3. Gradually everyone reached the top of the mountain they had climbed before.

4. Just now he remembered his rather important assignment.

5. Often you go too far with your jokes.


--For answers scroll down.












Answers:

1. extremely modifies the adjective tired, and very modifies the adjective sore

2. yesterday and hardly modify the verb had completed, very modifies the adjective hard, and rudely modifies the verb was interrupted

3. gradually modifies the verb reached, and before modifies the verb had climbed

4. just modifies the adverb now, now modifies the verb remembered, and rather modifies the adjective important

5. often modifies the verb go, too modifies the adverb far, and far modifies the verb go

For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html. Our lessons are also available to purchase in an eBook, a FlipBook, and a Workbook format.

Friday, December 5, 2014

Lesson 65 - Parts of Speech - Adverbs

These sentences have adverbs that tell us how much, and they modify other adverbs.

Instructions: List those adverbs and what they modify.

1. The carpenter worked somewhat cautiously.

2. The project was moving rather slowly.

3. The amusement ride was much too fast for me to try.

4. The program lasted much too long for Paul.

5. Halloween was too far away for little Jim.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. somewhat modifying the adverb cautiously which modifies the verb worked

2. rather modifying the adverb slowly which modifies the verb was moving

3. much modifying the adverb too which modifies the adjective fast

4. much modifying the adverb too which modifies the adjective long

5. too modifying the adverb far, and far modifying the adverb away which modifies the verb was

For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html. Our lessons are also available to purchase in an eBook, a FlipBook, and a Workbook format.

Thursday, December 4, 2014

Lesson 64 - Parts of Speech - Adverbs

These sentences have adverbs that modify adjectives and tell us how much.

Instructions: List the adverbs and what they modify.

1. Ila is an unusually good cook.

2. Jeff is very hungry.

3. We all want a perfectly just government.

4. The Internet is an entirely modern concept.

5. These sentences are extremely brief ones.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. unusually modifying the adjective good

2. very modifying the adjective hungry

3. perfectly modifying the adjective just

4. entirely modifying the adjective modern

5. extremely modifying the adjective brief

For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html. Our lessons are also available to purchase in an eBook, a FlipBook, and a Workbook format.

Wednesday, December 3, 2014

Lesson 63 - Parts of Speech - Adverbs

These sentences have adverbs that tell us where, and they modify the verb.

Instructions:  Find these adverbs and tell what they modify.

1. The fighter moved forward to meet his opponent.

2. There went the boy for some fun.

3. Sit here in this comfortable chair.

4. We are playing outside.

5. Where have you been?


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. forward modifying the verb moved

2. there modifying the verb went

3. here modifying the verb sit

4. outside modifying the verb are playing

5. where modifying the verb have been

For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html. Our lessons are also available to purchase in an eBook, a FlipBook, and a Workbook format.

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