Thursday, July 2, 2015

Lesson 204 - Parts of the Sentence - Conjunctions

A conjunction is a word that joins other words, phrases, or clauses. Co-ordinate conjunctions join words, phases, or clauses of equal rank. There are two kinds simple and correlative. The simple co-ordinate conjunctions are the following: and, but, or, and nor. The correlative co-ordinate conjunctions are always in pairs. They are either-or, neither-nor, both-and, not only-but also, and whether-or.

In these lessons simple co-ordinates will be referred to as co-ordinate conjunctions, and correlative co-ordinates will be referred to as correlative conjunctions. The co-ordinate and correlative conjunctions should be memorized since they are common and few in number.

Instructions: As a review of all the parts of the sentence, in the following sentences find the conjunctions and tell whether they are co-ordinate or correlative conjunctions, and then tell how each of the other words are used.

1. The very happy guests laughed and talked with the hosts.

2. They will invite both Joe and his wife tomorrow.

3. Two hot drinks, coffee and tea, will be served daily.

4. Their first visitors were Lottie and Elaine.

5. We neither saw nor heard anything important.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. and = co-ordinate conjunction; laughed/talked = verbs; guests = subject; with = preposition; hosts = object of the preposition; the/happy/the = adjectives; very = adverb

2. both/and = correlative conjunction; will invite =verb; they = subject; Joe/wife = direct objects; his = adjective; tomorrow = adverb

3. and = co-ordinate conjunction; will be served = verb; drinks = subject; coffee/tea = appositives; two/hot = adjectives; daily = adverb

4. and = co-ordinate conjunction; were = verb; visitors = subject; Lottie/Elaine = predicate nominatives; their/first = adjectives

5. neither/nor = correlative; saw/heard = verbs; we = subject; anything = direct object; important = object complement

For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html. Our lessons are also available to purchase in an eBook, a FlipBook, and a Workbook format.

Wednesday, July 1, 2015

Lesson 203 - Parts of the Sentence - Conjunctions

A conjunction is a word that joins other words, phrases, or clauses. Co-ordinate conjunctions join words, phases, or clauses of equal rank. There are two kinds simple and correlative. The simple co-ordinate conjunctions are the following: and, but, or, and nor. The correlative co-ordinate conjunctions are always in pairs. They are either-or, neither-nor, both-and, not only-but also, and whether-or.

In these lessons simple co-ordinates will be referred to as co-ordinate conjunctions, and correlative co-ordinates will be referred to as correlative conjunctions. The co-ordinate and correlative conjunctions should be memorized since they are common and few in number.

Instructions: As a review of all the parts of the sentence, in the following sentences find the conjunctions and tell whether they are co-ordinate or correlative conjunctions, and then tell how each of the other words are used.

1. The basketball team scored quickly and easily.

2. The wrestler was a small but strong individual.

3. Neither Helen nor her family will associate with us.

4. Jim, Jeff and Shawn went to Wendover but told no one.

5. A group of pretty girls and older women followed them.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. and = co-ordinate conjunction; scored = verb; team = subject; the/basketball = adjectives; quickly/easily = adverbs

2. but = co-ordinate conjunction; was = verb; wrestler = subject; individual = predicate nominative; the/a/small/strong = adjectives

3. neither/nor = correlative conjunction; will associate = verb; Helen/family = subjects; with = preposition; us = object of the preposition; her = adjective

4. and/but = co-ordinate conjunctions; went/told = verbs; Jim/Jeff/Shawn = subjects; no one = direct object; to = preposition; Wendover = object of the preposition

5. and = co-ordinate conjunction; followed = verb; group = subject; them = direct object; of = preposition; girls/women = objects of the preposition; a/pretty/older = adjectives.

For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html. Our lessons are also available to purchase in an eBook, a FlipBook, and a Workbook format.

Tuesday, June 30, 2015

Lesson 202 - Parts of the Sentence - Conjunctions

A conjunction is a word that joins other words, phrases, or clauses. Co-ordinate conjunctions join words, phases, or clauses of equal rank. There are two kinds simple and correlative. The simple co-ordinate conjunctions are the following: and, but, or, and nor. The correlative co-ordinate conjunctions are always in pairs. They are either-or, neither-nor, both-and, not only-but also, and whether-or.

In these lessons simple co-ordinates will be referred to as co-ordinate conjunctions, and correlative co-ordinates will be referred to as correlative conjunctions. The co-ordinate and correlative conjunctions should be memorized since they are common and few in number.

Instructions: As a review of all the parts of the sentence, in the following sentences find the conjunctions and tell whether they are co-ordinate or correlative conjunctions, and then tell how each of the other words are used.

1. Run up the hill and through the valley.

2. I will be waiting for Ann and her family.

3. The clouds were neither large nor billowy.

4. At the convention I saw not only my neighbor but also my cousin.

5. The dog owner called his favorite dogs Laddie and Lady.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. and = co-ordinate conjunction; run = verb; you (understood) = subject; up/through = prepositions; hill/valley = object of the preposition; the/the = adjectives

2. and = co-ordinate conjunction; will be waiting = verb; I = subject; for = preposition; Ann/family = objects of the preposition; her = adjective

3. neither/nor = correlative conjunction; were = verb; clouds = subject; large/billowy = predicate adjectives; the = adjective

4. not only/but also = correlative conjunction; saw = verb; I = subject; neighbor/cousin = direct objects; at = preposition; convention = object of the preposition; the/my/my = adjectives

5. and = co-ordinate conjunction; called = verb; owner = subject; dogs = direct object; Laddie/Lady = object complements; the/dog/his/favorite = adjectives

For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html. Our lessons are also available to purchase in an eBook, a FlipBook, and a Workbook format.

Monday, June 29, 2015

Lesson 201 - Parts of the Sentence - Conjunctions

A conjunction is a word that joins other words, phrases, or clauses. Co-ordinate conjunctions join words, phases, or clauses of equal rank. There are two kinds simple and correlative. The simple co-ordinate conjunctions are the following: and, but, or, and nor. The correlative co-ordinate conjunctions are always in pairs. They are either-or, neither-nor, both-and, not only-but also, and whether-or.

In these lessons simple co-ordinates will be referred to as co-ordinate conjunctions, and correlative co-ordinates will be referred to as correlative conjunctions. The co-ordinate and correlative conjunctions should be memorized since they are common and few in number.

Instructions: As a review of all the parts of the sentence, in the following sentences find the conjunctions and tell whether they are co-ordinate or correlative conjunctions, and then tell how each of the other words are used.

1. Jeff and Jim cut the grass.

2. Mr. Smith, our neighbor and friend, is visiting Africa.

3. Lindsay gave both Ila and me a surprise.

4. The rabbit hopped and skipped about in the yard.

5. The new manager will be either Bill or Fred.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. and = co-ordinate conjunction; cut = verb; Jeff/Jim = subject; the = adjective

2. and = co-ordinate conjunction; is visiting = verb; Mr. Smith = subject; Africa = direct object; neighbor/friend = appositives; our = adjective

3. both/and = correlative conjunction; gave = verb; Lindsay = subject; surprise = direct object; Ila/me = indirect object; a = adjective

4. and = co-ordinate conjunction; hopped/skipped = verbs; rabbit = subject; the/the = adjectives; in = preposition; yard = object of the preposition

5. either/or = correlative conjunction; will be = verb; manager = subject; Bill/Fred = predicate nominative; the/new = adjectives

For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html. Our lessons are also available to purchase in an eBook, a FlipBook, and a Workbook format.

Saturday, June 27, 2015

Quiz for Lessons 196 - 200 - Parts of the Sentence - Review

Instructions: Using all the knowledge learned in the previous lessons, find the verb (v), subjects (subj), predicate nominatives (pn), direct objects (do), appositives (app), nouns of address (na), adjectives (adj), predicate adjectives (pa), adverbs (adv), prepositions (prep), objects of the preposition (op), prepositional phrases (p ph), indirect objects (io), and objective complements (oc) in the following sentences.

1. The hostess served her special guests a delicious meal.

2. Many young boys carry charms in their pockets for good luck.

3. The sunlight made the apple red.

4. Harry, was that man the owner of the winning horse?

5. Reinforced concrete is famous for its strength.

6. The happy parents named their new daughter Joy.

7. Aunt Fern offered her children a part of the business.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. served = v; hostess = subj; meal = do; guests = io; the = adj modifying hostess; her/special = adj modifying guests; a/delicious = adj modifying meal

2. carry = v; boys = subj; charms = do; many/young = adj modifying boys; in their pockets/for good luck = p ph modifying carry; in/for = prep; pockets/luck = op; their = adj modifying pockets; good = adj modifying luck

3. made = v; sunlight = subj; apple = do; red = oc; the = adj modifying sunlight; the = adj modifying apple

4. was = v; man = subj; owner = pn; Harry = na; that = adj modifying man; the = adj modifying owner; of the winning horse = p ph modifying owner; of = prep; horse = op; the/winning = adj modifying horse

5. is = v; concrete = subj; famous = pa; reinforced = adj modifying concrete; for its strength = p ph modifying famous; for = prep; strength = op; its = adj modifying strength

6. named = v; parents = subj; daughter = do; Joy = oc; the/happy = adj modifying parents; their/new = adj modifying daughter

7. offered = v; Aunt Fern = subj; part = do; children = io; her = adj modifying children; a = adj modifying part; of the business = p ph modifying part; of = prep; business = op; the = adj modifying business

For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html. Our lessons are also available to purchase in an eBook, a FlipBook, and a Workbook format.

Friday, June 26, 2015

Lesson 200 - Parts of the Sentence - Objective Complement

Instructions: Using all the knowledge learned in the previous lessons, find the verb (v), subjects (subj), predicate nominatives (pn), direct objects (do), appositives (app), nouns of address (na), adjectives (adj), predicate adjectives (pa), adverbs (adv), prepositions (prep), objects of the preposition (op), prepositional phrases (p ph), indirect objects (io), and objective complements (oc) in the following sentences.

1. Mother gave me an Inca necklace for Christmas.

2. The town council named the old building condemned.

3. The sad news drove the man insane.

4. The plumber had always brought his tools with him before.

5. Have the dirty clothes been washed yet?


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. gave = v; Mother = subj; necklace = do; me = io modifying gave; an/Inca = adj modifying necklace; for Christmas = p ph modifying gave; for = prep; Christmas = op

2. named = v; council = subj; building = do; condemned = oc; the/town = adj modifying council; the/old = adj modifying building

3. drove = v; news = subj; man = do; insane = oc; the/sad = adj modifying news; the = adj modifying man

4. had brought = v; plumber = subj; tools = do; the = adj modifying plumber; his = adj modifying tools; always/before = adv modifying had brought; with him = p ph modifying had brought; with = prep; him = op

5. have been washed = v; clothes = subj; the/dirty = adj modifying clothes; yet = adv modifying have been washed

For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html. Our lessons are also available to purchase in an eBook, a FlipBook, and a Workbook format.

Thursday, June 25, 2015

Lesson 199 - Parts of the Sentence - Objective Complement

Instructions: Using all the knowledge learned in the previous lessons, find the verb (v), subjects (subj), predicate nominatives (pn), direct objects (do), appositives (app), nouns of address (na), adjectives (adj), predicate adjectives (pa), adverbs (adv), prepositions (prep), objects of the preposition (op), prepositional phrases (p ph), indirect objects (io), and objective complements (oc) in the following sentences.

1. In my English paper yesterday, the teacher found four errors.

2. The children call their two dogs Mutt and Jeff.

3. The rich husband bought his wife a fur coat.

4. After many years of study, Fred became an excellent dentist.

5. The Presidential candidate made the Marriott Hotel his headquarters.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. found = v; teacher = subj; errors = do; the = adj modifying teacher; four = adj modifying errors; yesterday = adv modifying found; in my English paper = p ph modifying found; in = prep; paper = op; my/English = adj modifying paper

2. call = v; children = subj; dogs = do; the = adj modifying children; their/two = adj modifying dogs; Mutt/Jeff = oc

3. bought = v; husband = subj; coat = do; wife = io; the/rich = adj modifying husband; his = adj modifying wife; a/fur = adj modifying coat

4. became = v; Fred = subj; dentist = pn; an/excellent = adj modifying dentist; after many years modifying became/of study modifying years = p ph; after/of = prep; years/study = op; many = adj modifying years

5. made = v; candidate = subj; Marriott Hotel = do; headquarters = oc; the/Presidential = adj modifying candidate; the = adj modifying Marriott Hotel; his = adj modifying headquarters

For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html. Our lessons are also available to purchase in an eBook, a FlipBook, and a Workbook format.

Wednesday, June 24, 2015

Lesson 198 - Parts of the Sentence - Objective Complement

An objective complement can be a noun or an adjective which follows the direct object renaming or modifying it. It is used with verbs like make, name, call, choose, elect, and appoint. It is not set off with commas as an appositive is. Example: I call my dog Badger.

A verb that has an objective complement in the active voice may in the passive voice have a predicate nominative or a predicate adjective. Examples: My dog is called Badger by me. I consider my dog smart. My dog is considered smart by me.

Instructions: Find the objective complements in the following sentences and tell whether they are nouns or adjectives.

1. NASA found the astronauts healthy and cheerful.

2. Special circumstances can make ordinary people heroes.

3. The group appointed the new member secretary.

4. We have always considered you capable of great things.

5. The minister pronounced the young couple man and wife.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. healthy/cheerful - adjectives

2. heroes - noun

3. secretary - noun

4. capable - adjective

5. man/wife - noun

For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html. Our lessons are also available to purchase in an eBook, a FlipBook, and a Workbook format.

Tuesday, June 23, 2015

Lesson 197 - Parts of the Sentence - Objective Complement

An objective complement can be a noun or an adjective which follows the direct object renaming or modifying it. It is used with verbs like make, name, call, choose, elect, and appoint. It is not set off with commas as an appositive is. Example: I call my dog Badger.

A verb that has an objective complement in the active voice may in the passive voice have a predicate nominative or a predicate adjective. Examples: My dog is called Badger by me. I consider my dog smart. My dog is considered smart by me.

Instructions: Find the objective complements in the following sentences and tell whether they are nouns or adjectives.

1. The man down the lane calls his farm Alfalfa.

2. The sergeant appointed the new recruit leader of the group.

3. Diligent practice can make one a skilled person.

4. Many people named Lincoln the best President.

5. Your irritableness makes everyone moody.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. Alfalfa - noun

2. leader - noun

3. person - noun

4. President - noun

5. moody - adjective

For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html. Our lessons are also available to purchase in an eBook, a FlipBook, and a Workbook format.

Monday, June 22, 2015

Lesson 196 - Parts of the Sentence - Objective Complement

An objective complement can be a noun or an adjective which follows the direct object renaming or modifying it. It is used with verbs like make, name, call, choose, elect, and appoint. It is not set off with commas as an appositive is. Example: I call my dog Badger.

A verb that has an objective complement in the active voice may in the passive voice have a predicate nominative or a predicate adjective. Examples: My dog is called Badger by me. I consider my dog smart. My dog is considered smart by me.

Instructions: Find the objective complements in the following sentences and tell whether they are nouns or adjectives.

1. Have you named Mr. Jones temporary chairman?

2. We called the boy on the horse Jock.

3. The team elected the twins co-captains.

4. The explorers found the old building empty.

5. Our present renters have kept the apartment clean.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. chairman - noun

2. Jock - noun

3. co-captains - noun

4. empty - adjective

5. clean - adjective

For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html. Our lessons are also available to purchase in an eBook, a FlipBook, and a Workbook format.

Saturday, June 20, 2015

Quiz for Lessons 191-195 - Parts of the Sentence - Review

Instructions: Using all the knowledge learned in the previous lessons, find the verb (v), subjects (subj), predicate nominatives (pn), direct objects (do), appositives (app), nouns of address (na), adjectives (adj), predicate adjectives (pa), adverbs (adv), prepositions (prep), objects of the preposition (op), prepositional phrases (p ph), and indirect objects (io) in the following sentences.

1. The car dealer gave Jim a low price for his old car.

2. Will wanted a job at the ranger station.

3. My neighbors brought me some candy and a basket of fruit for my birthday.

4. We gave the man the name of a lodge near Trial Lake.

5. An unknown donor gave the hospital a million dollars for research.

6. The frightening experience taught the child some important lessons.

7. You should have given Boyd and me more time.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. gave = v; dealer = subj; price = do; Jim = io; the/car = adj modifying dealer; a/low = adj modifying price; for his old car = p ph modifying either gave or price; for = prep; car = op; his/old = adj modifying car

2. wanted = v; Will = subj; job = do; a = adj modifying job; at the ranger station = p ph modifying job; at = prep; station = op; the/ranger = adj modifying station

3. brought = v; neighbors = subj; candy/basket = do; me = io modifying brought; my = adj modifying neighbors; some = adj modifying candy; a = adj modifying basket; of fruit modifying basket/for my birthday modifying brought = p ph; of/for = prep; fruit/birthday = op; my = adj modifying birthday

4. gave = v; we = subj; name = do; man = io; the = adj modifying man; the = adj modifying name; of a lodge modifying name/near Trial Lake modifying lodge = p ph; of/near = prep; lodge/Trial Lake = op; a = adj modifying lodge

5. gave = v; donor = subj; dollars = do; hospital = io; an/unknown = adj modifying donor; the = adj modifying hospital; a/million = adj modifying dollars; for research = p ph modifying gave; for = prep; research = op

6. taught = v; experience = subj; lessons = do; child = io modifying taught; the/frightening = adj modifying experience; the = adj modifying child; some/important = adj modifying lessons

7. should have given = v; you = subj; time = do; Boyd/me = io modifying should have given; more = adj modifying time

For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html. Our lessons are also available to purchase in an eBook, a FlipBook, and a Workbook format.

Friday, June 19, 2015

Lesson 195 - Parts of the Sentence - Indirect Objects

An indirect object is really a prepositional phrase in which the preposition to or for is not stated but understood. It tells to whom or for whom something is done. The indirect object always comes between the verb and the direct object. Example: She gave me a gift. The indirect object always modifies the verb. It may have modifiers and be compound. It is used with verbs such as give, tell, send, get, buy, show, build, do, make, save, and read. Example: She sent the man and me a gift.

Instructions: Using all the knowledge learned in the previous lessons, find the verb (v), subjects (subj), predicate nominatives (pn), direct objects (do), appositives (app), nouns of address (na), adjectives (adj), predicate adjectives (pa), adverbs (adv), prepositions (prep), objects of the preposition (op), prepositional phrases (p ph), and indirect objects (io) in the following sentences.

1. At the mall Pam bought her children two new toys.

2. Tomorrow you should send your friend a thank you card.

3. The veteran pitcher threw the rookie hitter a fast-breaking curve ball.

4. The public defender gave her client her best advice.

5. Eric showed his math teacher a problem with the question.


--For answers scroll down.












Answers:

1. bought = v; Pam = subj; toys = do; children = io modifying bought; two/new = adj modifying toys; her = adj modifying children; at the mall = p ph modifying bought; at = prep; mall = op; the = adj modifying mall

2. should send = v; you = subj; card = do; friend = io modifying should send; a/thank you = adj modifying card; your = adj modifying friend; tomorrow = adv modifying should send

3. threw = v; pitcher = subj; ball = do; hitter = io modifying threw; the/veteran = adj modifying pitcher; the/rookie = adj modifying hitter; a/fast-breaking/curve = adj modifying ball

4. gave = v; defender = subj; advice = do; client = io modifying gave; the/public =adj modifying defender; her = adj modifying client; her/best = adj modifying advice

5. showed = v; Eric = subj; problem = do; teacher = io modifying showed; his/math = adj modifying teacher; a = adj modifying problem; with the question = p ph modifying problem; with = prep; question = op; the = adj modifying question

For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html. Our lessons are also available to purchase in an eBook, a FlipBook, and a Workbook format.

Thursday, June 18, 2015

Lesson 194 - Parts of the Sentence - Indirect Objects

An indirect object is really a prepositional phrase in which the preposition to or for is not stated but understood. It tells to whom or for whom something is done. The indirect object always comes between the verb and the direct object. Example: She gave me a gift. The indirect object always modifies the verb. It may have modifiers and be compound. It is used with verbs such as give, tell, send, get, buy, show, build, do, make, save, and read. Example: She sent the man and me a gift.

Instructions: Rewrite the following sentences so each has an indirect object.

1. I asked an important question of my mother.

2. Grandpa read the nursery rhymes to the grandchildren.

3. She bought a new dress for herself.

4. He did a great favor for the whole town.

5. The artist showed his most famous painting to the viewers.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. I asked my mother an important question.

2. Grandpa read the grandchildren the nursery rhymes.

3. She bought herself a new dress.

4. He did the whole town a great favor.

5. The artist showed the viewers his most famous painting.

For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html. Our lessons are also available to purchase in an eBook, a FlipBook, and a Workbook format.

Wednesday, June 17, 2015

Lesson 193 - Parts of the Sentence - Indirect Objects

An indirect object is really a prepositional phrase in which the preposition to or for is not stated but understood. It tells to whom or for whom something is done. The indirect object always comes between the verb and the direct object. Example: She gave me a gift. The indirect object always modifies the verb. It may have modifiers and be compound. It is used with verbs such as give, tell, send, get, buy, show, build, do, make, save, and read. Example: She sent the man and me a gift.

Instructions: Find the verb, direct object, and indirect object in the following sentences.

1. The new manager offered Jay a higher position.

2. This spring Carl told us his plans for the summer.

3. Many jobs don't pay the employees much money.

4. Mr. Blower read the neighbor children some interesting stories about Australia.

5. Mr. Smith, my broker, sold my parents some stock yesterday.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. offered = verb; position = direct object; Jay = indirect object

2. told = verb; plans = direct object; us = indirect object

3. do pay = verb; money = direct object; employees = indirect object

4. read = verb; stories = direct object; children = indirect object

5. sold = verb; stock = direct object; parents = indirect object

For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html. Our lessons are also available to purchase in an eBook, a FlipBook, and a Workbook format.

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