Thursday, September 3, 2015

Lesson 249 - Parts of the Sentence - Compound Sentences

A clause is a group of words having a subject and a verb. An independent clause can stand alone as a sentence. A dependent clause is always used as some part of speech. It can be an adjective, adverb, or noun. It cannot stand alone as a sentence.

A phrase is a group of words used as a sentence part. It does not have a subject and a verb. It can be a noun, adjective or adverb. We have studied the following phrases: prepositional, gerund, participial, and infinitive.

A compound sentence combines two or more independent clauses. Commas separate the clauses of a compound sentence. (A short sentence joined by and is sometimes combined without a comma.) Example: She talks and he listens. A semicolon can take the place of the conjunction and comma. Only clauses closely related in thought should be joined to make a compound sentence.

The conjunction should express the proper relationship between the clauses. And joins ideas of equal importance. Or joins clauses that express alternatives. Nor joins negative ideas together. But joins clauses that express contrasting ideas.

Do not confuse a compound sentence with a simple sentence having compound parts. Both sides of the conjunction will make sense in a compound sentence. Example: Mother baked a cake / and / I frosted it.

Instructions: Tell whether the following sentences are compound sentences or not. If they are not, tell which compound part they are.

1. The girl just sat there but said nothing.

2. I looked for the book, but I could not find it.

3. Jeff must have arrived safely, or we would have been notified.

4. One of my friends and his dad have flown to Brazil.

5. Everyone was playing or swimming in the pool.

6. Suddenly the rain poured down, and the party was ruined.

7. We will vacation in the Black Hills or at Waterton.

8. I haven't heard from Becky, nor do I expect a call soon.

9. I climbed the tree and looked in the bird's nest.

10. She planned to read the letter, but it could not be found.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. compound verb

2. compound sentence

3. compound sentence

4. compound subject

5. compound verb

6. compound sentence

7. compound object of the preposition

8. compound sentence

9. compound verb

10. compound sentence

For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html. Our lessons are also available to purchase in an eBook, a FlipBook, and a Workbook format.

Wednesday, September 2, 2015

Lesson 248 - Parts of the Sentence - Compound Sentences

A clause is a group of words having a subject and a verb. An independent clause can stand alone as a sentence. A dependent clause is always used as some part of speech. It can be an adjective, adverb, or noun. It cannot stand alone as a sentence.

A phrase is a group of words used as a sentence part. It does not have a subject and a verb. It can be a noun, adjective or adverb. We have studied the following phrases: prepositional, gerund, participial, and infinitive.

A compound sentence combines two or more independent clauses. Commas separate the clauses of a compound sentence. (A short sentence joined by and is sometimes combined without a comma.) Example: She talks and he listens. A semicolon can take the place of the conjunction and comma. Only clauses closely related in thought should be joined to make a compound sentence.

The conjunction should express the proper relationship between the clauses. And joins ideas of equal importance. Or joins clauses that express alternatives. Nor joins negative ideas together. But joins clauses that express contrasting ideas.

Instructions: Combine the following sentences using the appropriate co-ordinate conjunctions, and, but, or, nor.

1. Mother wanted to watch the movie. Dad wanted to see the wrestling.

2. You must remember your password. You cannot log on.

3. I wanted to walk across the river. The ice was too thin.

4. It was a warm, beautiful day. My desires matched the day perfectly.

5. You did not help you brother. He doesn't expect you to help him.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. Mother wanted to watch the movie, but Dad wanted to see the wrestling.

2. You must remember your password, or you cannot log on.

3. I wanted to walk across the river, but the ice was too thin.

4. It was a warm, beautiful day, and my desires matched the day perfectly.

5. You did not help your brother, nor does he expect you to do so.

For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html. Our lessons are also available to purchase in an eBook, a FlipBook, and a Workbook format.

Tuesday, September 1, 2015

Lesson 247 - Parts of the Sentence - Compound Sentences

A clause is a group of words having a subject and a verb. An independent clause can stand alone as a sentence. A dependent clause is always used as some part of speech. It can be an adjective, adverb, or noun. It cannot stand alone as a sentence.

A phrase is a group of words used as a sentence part. It does not have a subject and a verb. It can be a noun, adjective or adverb. We have studied the following phrases: prepositional, gerund, participial, and infinitive.

A compound sentence combines two or more independent clauses. Commas separate the clauses of a compound sentence. (A short sentence joined by and is sometimes combined without a comma.) Example: She talks and he listens. A semicolon can take the place of the conjunction and comma. Only clauses closely related in thought should be joined to make a compound sentence.

Instructions: Tell if the following sentences are good combinations.

1. Mr. Jones is a very short man, but he walks with an air of authority.

2. Today has been very warm, and I have some English lessons to write.

3. I have again been to Mexico, but I don't expect to return soon.

4. My dog is a short, stupid-looking dog, but he is very smart.

5. The mail comes about noon each day, and I need to weed the flowers.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. a good combination

2. a poor combination

3. a good combination

4. a good combination

5. a poor combination

For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html. Our lessons are also available to purchase in an eBook, a FlipBook, and a Workbook format.

Monday, August 31, 2015

Lesson 246 - Parts of the Sentence - Compound Sentences

A clause is a group of words having a subject and a verb. An independent clause can stand alone as a sentence. A dependent clause is always used as some part of speech. It can be an adjective, adverb, or noun. It cannot stand alone as a sentence.

A phrase is a group of words used as a sentence part. It does not have a subject and a verb. It can be a noun, adjective or adverb. We have studied the following phrases: prepositional, gerund, participial, and infinitive.

A compound sentence combines two or more independent clauses. Commas separate the clauses of a compound sentence. (A short sentence joined by and is sometimes combined without a comma.) Example: She talks and he listens. A semicolon can take the place of the conjunction and comma. Only clauses closely related in thought should be joined to make a compound sentence.

Instructions: Tell whether each group of words is a clause or a phrase.

1. Before the gate broke

2. After having eaten

3. In answer to your question

4. How I will mark the reports

5. Made of sweat and blood

6. Upon whom the blame lies

7. By remaining totally still

8. Why did you stop

9. After everyone ceased shouting

10. To take me home


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. clause

2. phrase

3. phrase

4. clause

5. phrase

6. clause

7. phrase

8. clause

9. clause

10. phrase

For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html. Our lessons are also available to purchase in an eBook, a FlipBook, and a Workbook format.

Saturday, August 29, 2015

Quiz for Lessons 241 - 245 - Parts of the Sentence - Verbals Review

Instructions: Using all the knowledge learned in the previous lessons, find the verbs (v), subjects (subj), predicate nominatives (pn), direct objects (do), appositives (app), nouns of address (na), adjectives (adj), predicate adjectives (pa), adverbs (adv), prepositions (prep), objects of the preposition (op), prepositional phrases (p ph), indirect objects (io), and objective complements (oc) in the following sentences.

If the word is a verbal, tell whether it is a gerund, participle, noun infinitive, adjective infinitive, or adverb infinitive. Tell which word the adjective, adverb, prepositional phrase, verbal, or verbal phrase modify.

Example: The actors performed there to entertain and to be seen. (performed = verb, actors = subject, the = adjective modifying actors, there = adverb modifying performed, to entertain/to be seen = adv. infinitives modifying performed, and = conjunction)

1. Are you too important to help the poor?

2. The crying child had upset everyone in the room.

3. He jumped across the gap without knowing the distance.

4. Exercising is good for everyone.

5. Jeff loves to dance constantly.

6. Teasing by your friends is hard to take.

7. Fearing reprisal, the people fled from the city.

8. Eating out is the thing to do tonight.

9. I don't know whether to tell him or to keep quiet.

10. Our next job, to run to the store, should be done quickly.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. are = verb, you = subject, important = predicate adjective modifying you, too = adverb modifying important, to help the poor = adverb infinitive phrase modifying important, poor = direct object to the verbal to help, the = adjective modifying poor

2. had upset = verb, child = subject, the = adjective modifying child, crying = participle modifying child, everyone = direct object, in the room = prepositional phrase modifying everyone, in = preposition, room = object of the preposition, the = adjective modifying room

3. jumped = verb, he = subject, across the gap = prepositional phrase modifying jumped, across = preposition, gap = object of the preposition, the = adjective modifying gap, without knowing the distance = prepositional phrase modifying jumped, without = preposition, knowing = gerund used as the object of the preposition, distance = direct object of the verbal knowing, the = adjective modifying distance

4. is = verb, exercising = gerund used as the subject, good = predicate adjective modifying exercising, for everyone = prepositional phrase modifying good, for = preposition, everyone = object of the preposition

5. loves = verb, Jeff = subject, to dance constantly = noun infinitive phrase used as a direct object, constantly = adverb modifying to dance

6. is = verb, teasing by your friends = gerund phrase used as the subject, by your friends = prepositional phrase modifying teasing, by = preposition, friends = object of the preposition, your = adjective modifying friends, hard = predicate adjective modifying teasing, to take = adverb infinitive modifying hard

7. fled = verb, people = subject, the = adjective modifying people, fearing reprisal = participial phrase modifying people, reprisal = direct object to the verbal fearing, from the city = prepositional phrase modifying fled, from = preposition, city = object of the preposition, the = adjective modifying city

8. is = verb, eating out = gerund phrase used as a subject, out = adverb modifying the verbal eating, thing = predicate nominative, the = adjective modifying thing, to do tonight = adjective infinitive phrase modifying thing, tonight = adverb modifying to do

9. do know = verb, I = subject, n't = adverb modifying do know, whether/or = correlative conjunction, to tell him/to keep quiet = noun infinitive phrases used as direct objects, him = direct object to the verbal to tell, quiet = adverb modifying to keep

10. should be done = verb, job = subject, our/next = adjectives modifying job, to run to the store = noun infinitive phrase used as an appositive, to the store = prepositional phrase modifying to run, to = preposition, store = object of the preposition, the = adjective modifying store, quickly = adverb modifying should be done

For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html. Our lessons are also available to purchase in an eBook, a FlipBook, and a Workbook format.

Friday, August 28, 2015

Lesson 245 - Parts of the Sentence - Verbals Review

Instructions: Using all the knowledge learned in the previous lessons, find the verbs (v), subjects (subj), predicate nominatives (pn), direct objects (do), appositives (app), nouns of address (na), adjectives (adj), predicate adjectives (pa), adverbs (adv), prepositions (prep), objects of the preposition (op), prepositional phrases (p ph), indirect objects (io), and objective complements (oc) in the following sentences.

If the word is a verbal, tell whether it is a gerund, participle, noun infinitive, adjective infinitive, or adverb infinitive. Tell which word the adjective, adverb, prepositional phrase, verbal, or verbal phrase modify.

Example: The actors performed there to entertain and to be seen. (performed = verb, actors = subject, the = adjective modifying actors, there = adverb modifying performed, to entertain/to be seen = adv. infinitives modifying performed, and = conjunction)

1. The rules are hard to remember.

2. Carl hopes to have enough time this week.

3. The President favors spending more money for welfare.

4. The destroyed room left no clues for the police.

5. I saw her trying to save the drowning cat.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. are = verb, rules = subject, the = adjective modifying rules, hard = predicate adjective modifying rules, to remember = adverb infinitive modifying hard

2. hopes = verb, Carl = subject, to have enough time this week = noun infinitive phrase used as a direct object, time = direct object to verbal to have, enough = adjective modifying time, week = adverb modifying verbal to have, this = adjective modifying week

3. favors = verb, President = subject, the = adjective modifying President, spending more money for welfare = gerund phrase used as direct object, money = direct object to the verbal spending, more = adjective modifying money, for welfare = prepositional phrase modifying spending, for = preposition, welfare = object of the preposition

4. left = verb, room = subject, the = adjective modifying room, destroyed = participle modifying room, clues = direct object, no = adjective modifying clues, for the police = prepositional phrase modifying clues, for = preposition, police = object of the preposition, the = adjective modifying police

5. saw = verb, I = subject, her = direct object, trying = participle used as an object compliment, to save the drowning cat = noun infinitive phrase used as a direct object to the verbal trying, cat = direct object to the verbal to save, the = adjective modifying cat, drowning = participle modifying cat

For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html. Our lessons are also available to purchase in an eBook, a FlipBook, and a Workbook format.

Thursday, August 27, 2015

Lesson 244 - Parts of the Sentence - Verbals Review

Instructions: Using all the knowledge learned in the previous lessons, find the verbs (v), subjects (subj), predicate nominatives (pn), direct objects (do), appositives (app), nouns of address (na), adjectives (adj), predicate adjectives (pa), adverbs (adv), prepositions (prep), objects of the preposition (op), prepositional phrases (p ph), indirect objects (io), and objective complements (oc) in the following sentences.

If the word is a verbal, tell whether it is a gerund, participle, noun infinitive, adjective infinitive, or adverb infinitive. Tell which word the adjective, adverb, prepositional phrase, verbal, or verbal phrase modify.

Example: The actors performed there to entertain and to be seen. (performed = verb, actors = subject, the = adjective modifying actors, there = adverb modifying performed, to entertain/to be seen = adv. infinitives modifying performed, and = conjunction)

1. The ricocheting car flew through the wall of the house.

2. Go to the thesaurus to find a better word.

3. This computer program is difficult to understand and follow.

4. Have you tried writing a letter to him?

5. Harold's chief interests are gambling and spending money.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. flew = verb, car = subject, the = adjective modifying car, ricocheting = participle modifying car, through the wall = prepositional phrase modifying flew, through = preposition, wall = object of the preposition, the = adjective modifying wall, of the house = prepositional phrase modifying wall, of = preposition, house = object of the preposition, the = adjective modifying house

2. go = verb, (you) = subject, to the thesaurus = prepositional phrase modifying go, to = preposition, thesaurus = object of the preposition, the = adjective modifying thesaurus, to find a better word = adverb infinitive phrase modifying go, word = direct object to the verbal to find, a/better = adjectives modifying word

3. is = verb, program = subject, this/computer = adjectives modifying program, difficult = predicate adjective modifying program, to understand/(to) follow = adverb infinitives modifying difficult, and = conjunction

4. have tried = verb, you = subject, writing a letter to him = gerund phrase used as direct object, letter = direct object to the verbal writing, a = adjective modifying letter, to him = prepositional phrase modifying writing, to = preposition, him = object of the preposition

5. are = verb, interests = subject, Harold's/chief = adjectives modifying interests, gambling/spending money = gerund and a gerund phrase used as predicate nominatives, money = direct object to verbal spending, and = conjunction

For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html. Our lessons are also available to purchase in an eBook, a FlipBook, and a Workbook format.

Wednesday, August 26, 2015

Lesson 243 - Parts of the Sentence - Verbals Review

Instructions: Using all the knowledge learned in the previous lessons, find the verbs (v), subjects (subj), predicate nominatives (pn), direct objects (do), appositives (app), nouns of address (na), adjectives (adj), predicate adjectives (pa), adverbs (adv), prepositions (prep), objects of the preposition (op), prepositional phrases (p ph), indirect objects (io), and objective complements (oc) in the following sentences.

If the word is a verbal, tell whether it is a gerund, participle, noun infinitive, adjective infinitive, or adverb infinitive. Tell which word the adjective, adverb, prepositional phrase, verbal, or verbal phrase modify.

Example: The actors performed there to entertain and to be seen. (performed = verb, actors = subject, the = adjective modifying actors, there = adverb modifying performed, to entertain/to be seen = adv. infinitives modifying performed, and = conjunction)

1. Blaming others is a coward's way to feel better.

2. We do not plan to change the landscape.

3. Keeping his promise, Jim was there to help.

4. I am too old to learn to ski.

5. One way to lose weight is to exercise.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. is = verb, blaming others = gerund phrase used as subject, others = direct object to verbal blaming, way = predicate nominative, a/coward's = adjectives modifying way, to feel better = adjective infinitive phrase modifying way, better = predicate adjective modifying verbal to feel

2. do plan = verb, we = subject, not = adverb modifying do plan, to change the landscape = noun infinitive phrase used as a direct object, landscape = direct object to the verbal to change, the = adjective modifying landscape

3. was = verb, Jim = subject, keeping his promise = participial phrase modifying Jim, promise = direct object to the verbal keeping, his = adjective modifying promise, there = adverb modifying was, to help = adverb infinitive modifying was

4. am = verb, I = subject, old = predicate adjective modifying am, too = adverb modifying old, to learn to ski = adverb infinitive phrase modifying old, to ski = noun infinitive used as the direct object of the verbal to learn

5. is = verb, way = subject, one = adjective modifying way, to lose weight = adjective infinite phrase modifying way, weight = direct object to the verbal to lose, to exercise = noun infinitive used as the predicate nominative

For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html. Our lessons are also available to purchase in an eBook, a FlipBook, and a Workbook format.

Tuesday, August 25, 2015

Lesson 242 - Parts of the Sentence - Verbals Review

Instructions: Using all the knowledge learned in the previous lessons, find the verbs (v), subjects (subj), predicate nominatives (pn), direct objects (do), appositives (app), nouns of address (na), adjectives (adj), predicate adjectives (pa), adverbs (adv), prepositions (prep), objects of the preposition (op), prepositional phrases (p ph), indirect objects (io), and objective complements (oc) in the following sentences.

If the word is a verbal, tell whether it is a gerund, participle, noun infinitive, adjective infinitive, or adverb infinitive. Tell which word the adjective, adverb, prepositional phrase, verbal, or verbal phrase modify.

Example: The actors performed there to entertain and to be seen. (performed = verb, actors = subject, the = adjective modifying actors, there = adverb modifying performed, to entertain/to be seen = adv. infinitives modifying performed, and = conjunction)

1. Do you have a car to rent?

2. Flags hung too high are hard to take down.

3. Your moaning and groaning will not make things easier.

4. You know my problem, hating too many foods.

5. To decorate for the wedding will cost a great deal.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. do have = verb, you = subject, car = direct object, a = adjective modifying car, to rent = adverb infinitive modifying do have

2. are = verb, flags = subject, hung too high = participial phrase modifying flags, high = adverb modifying hung, too = adverb modifying high, hard = predicate adjective modifying flags, to take down = adverb infinitive phrase modifying hard, down = adverb modifying to take

3. will make = verb, moaning/groaning = gerunds used as subjects, your = adjective modifying moaning/groaning, not = adverb modifying will make, things = direct object, easier = object compliment modifying things

4. know = verb. you = subject, problem = direct object, my = adjective modifying problem, hating too many foods = gerund phrase used as appositive, foods = direct object, many = adjective modifying foods, too = adverb modifying many

5. will cost = verb, to decorate for the wedding = noun infinitive phrase used as a subject, for the wedding = prepositional phrase modifying to decorate, for = preposition, wedding = object of the preposition, the = adjective modifying wedding, deal = direct object, a/great = adjectives modifying deal

For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html. Our lessons are also available to purchase in an eBook, a FlipBook, and a Workbook format.

Monday, August 24, 2015

Lesson 241 - Parts of the Sentence - Verbals Review

Instructions: Using all the knowledge learned in the previous lessons, find the verbs (v), subjects (subj), predicate nominatives (pn), direct objects (do), appositives (app), nouns of address (na), adjectives (adj), predicate adjectives (pa), adverbs (adv), prepositions (prep), objects of the preposition (op), prepositional phrases (p ph), indirect objects (io), and objective complements (oc) in the following sentences.

If the word is a verbal, tell whether it is a gerund, participle, noun infinitive, adjective infinitive, or adverb infinitive. Tell which word the adjective, adverb, prepositional phrase, verbal, or verbal phrase modify.

Example: The actors performed there to entertain and to be seen. (performed = verb, actors = subject, the = adjective modifying actors, there = adverb modifying performed, to entertain/to be seen = adv. infinitives modifying performed, and = conjunction)

1. I finally bought me a hearing aid to hear better.

2. Sometimes I just need to try again.

3. Having decided definitely, he stepped onto the train to leave home.

4. The person winning the lottery will have a different life.

5. You can only reach our place by crossing the river.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. bought = verb, I = subject, finally = adverb modifying bought, me = indirect object, hearing aid = direct object, a = adjective modifying hearing aid, to hear better = adverb infinitive phrase modifying bought, better = adverb modifying to hear

2. need = verb, I = subject, sometimes/just = adverbs modifying need, to try again = noun infinitive phrase used as the direct object, again = adverb modifying to try

3. stepped = verb, he = subject, having decided definitely = participial phrase modifying he, definitely = adverb modifying having decided, onto the train = prepositional phase modifying stepped, onto = preposition, train = object of the preposition, the = adjective modifying train, to leave home = adverb infinitive phrase modifying stepped, home = adverb modifying to leave

4. will have = verb, person = subject, the = adjective modifying person, winning the lottery = participial phrase modifying person, lottery = direct object to the verbal winning, the = adjective modifying lottery, life = direct object, a/different = adjectives modifying life

5. can reach = verb, you = subject, only = adverb modifying can reach, place = direct object, our = adjective modifying place, by crossing the river = prepositional phrase modifying can reach, by = preposition, crossing the river = gerund phrase used as the object of the preposition, river = direct object to the verbal crossing, the = adjective modifying river

For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html. Our lessons are also available to purchase in an eBook, a FlipBook, and a Workbook format.

Saturday, August 22, 2015

Quiz for Lessons 236 - 240 - Parts of the Sentence - Verbals

Instructions: Find the gerunds, gerund phrases, participles, participial phrases, infinitives or infinitive phrases in these sentences, tell what kind of verbal they are, and how they are used.

1. Are you too busy to help us?

2. The crying child rushed to his mother.

3. He jumped from the cliff without looking down.

4. Walking is good for everyone.

5. Jim loves to play basketball.

6. Correction by others is hard to take.

7. Fearing their enemies, many small animals are nocturnal.

8. Law and Order is the program to watch tonight.

9. I don't know whether to go or to stay.

10. Our next job, to finish the painting, should be easy.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. to help us is an adverb infinitive modifying the predicate adjective busy

2. crying is a participle modifying the subject child.

3. looking down is a gerund phrase used as the object of the preposition without

4. walking is a gerund used as the subject

5. to play basketball is a noun infinitive phrase used as the direct object

6. to take is an adverb infinitive modifying the predicate adjective hard

7. fearing their enemies is a participial phrase modifying the subject animals

8. to watch tonight is an adjective infinitive phrase modifying the predicate nominative program

9. to go/to stay are noun infinitives used as direct objects

10. to finish the painting is a noun infinitive used as an appositive/ painting is a gerund used as the direct object to the verbal to finish

For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html. Our lessons are also available to purchase in an eBook, a FlipBook, and a Workbook format.

Friday, August 21, 2015

Lesson 240 - Parts of the Sentence - Verbals

A verbal is a verb form used as some other part of speech. There are three kinds of verbals: gerunds, participles and infinitives.

A gerund always ends in ing and is used as a noun. Eating is fun.

A participle is used as an adjective and ends in various ways. A present participle always ends with ing as does the gerund, but remember that it is an adjective. A past participle ends with ed, n, or irregularly. Examples: played, broken, brought, sung, seeing, having seen, being seen, seen, having been seen.

An infinitive is to plus a verb form. It can be a noun, an adjective, or an adverb. Examples: to be, to see, to be seen, to be eaten.

Instructions: Find the gerunds, gerund phrases, participles, participial phrases, infinitives or infinitive phrases in these sentences, tell what kind of verbal they are, and how they are used.

1. You are difficult to understand.

2. Jack hopes to join the Army next month.

3. The Senate favors increasing taxes.

4. The broken lamp lay on the floor.

5. I saw him trying to open the trunk.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. to understand is an adverb infinitive modifying the predicate adjective difficult

2. to join the Army next month is a noun infinitive phrase used as the direct object

3. increasing taxes is a gerund phrase used as the direct object

4. broken is a participle modifying the subject lamp

5. trying to open the trunk is a participial phrase modifying the direct object him/to open the trunk is a noun infinitive phrase used as the direct object to the verbal trying

For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html. Our lessons are also available to purchase in an eBook, a FlipBook, and a Workbook format.

Thursday, August 20, 2015

Lesson 239 - Parts of the Sentence - Verbals

A verbal is a verb form used as some other part of speech. There are three kinds of verbals: gerunds, participles and infinitives.

A gerund always ends in ing and is used as a noun. Eating is fun.

A participle is used as an adjective and ends in various ways. A present participle always ends with ing as does the gerund, but remember that it is an adjective. A past participle ends with ed, n, or irregularly. Examples: played, broken, brought, sung, seeing, having seen, being seen, seen, having been seen.

An infinitive is to plus a verb form. It can be a noun, an adjective, or an adverb. Examples: to be, to see, to be seen, to be eaten.

Instructions: Find the gerunds, gerund phrases, participles, participial phrases, infinitives or infinitive phrases in these sentences, tell what kind of verbal they are, and how they are used.

1. The glancing blow did little damage.

2. Go to the dictionary to look for the answer.

3. This computer game is easy to play and to understand.

4. Have you tried writing it down daily?

5. His chief interests are skiing and racing.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. glancing is a participle modifying the subject blow

2. to look for the answer is an adverb infinitive phrase modifying the verb go

3. to play/to understand are adverb infinitives modifying the predicate adjective easy

4. writing it down daily is a gerund phrase used as the direct object

5. skiing/racing are gerunds used as predicate nominatives

For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html. Our lessons are also available to purchase in an eBook, a FlipBook, and a Workbook format.

Wednesday, August 19, 2015

Lesson 238 - Parts of the Sentence - Verbals

A verbal is a verb form used as some other part of speech. There are three kinds of verbals: gerunds, participles and infinitives.

A gerund always ends in ing and is used as a noun. Eating is fun.

A participle is used as an adjective and ends in various ways. A present participle always ends with ing as does the gerund, but remember that it is an adjective. A past participle ends with ed, n, or irregularly. Examples: played, broken, brought, sung, seeing, having seen, being seen, seen, having been seen.

An infinitive is to plus a verb form. It can be a noun, an adjective, or an adverb. Examples: to be, to see, to be seen, to be eaten.

Instructions: Find the gerunds, gerund phrases, participles, participial phrases, infinitives or infinitive phrases in these sentences, tell what kind of verbal they are, and how they are used.

1. Blaming others is not being honest with oneself.

2. We do not plan to change the rules.

3. Forgetting his promise, Jeff returned home late.

4. My dog is too old to learn new tricks.

5. One way to improve is regular practice.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. blaming others is a gerund phrase used as the subject

2. to change the rules is a noun infinitive phrase used as the direct object

3. forgetting his promise is a participial phrase modifying the subject Jeff

4. to learn new tricks is an adverb infinitive phrase modifying the predicate adjective old

5. to improve is an adjective infinitive modifying the subject way

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