Monday, January 22, 2018

Lesson 351 - Mechanics - Punctuation - Commas

Use a comma to separate introductory words yes and no and mild interjections from the sentence that follows them.

Examples: Oh, I heard that before. Yes, I will be here.

Instructions: Place commas where they are needed.

1. Yes you may leave the room.

2. Of course I won't change my plans.

3. Oh you want to try my patience more.

4. No I didn't see you there.

5. Wow you think that is great.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. Yes,

2. Of course,

3. Oh,

4. No,

5. Wow,

For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html. Our lessons are also available to purchase in an eBook and a Workbook format.

Saturday, January 20, 2018

Quiz for Lessons 346 - 350 - Mechanics - Punctuation - Commas

Instructions: Place commas where they are needed.

1. Baseball basketball track and tennis require running.

2. The numbers 8 16 32 and 48 are called even numbers.

3. Eat drink and make merry for you will soon die.

4. I like shopping my husband likes dining and the family likes activities.

5. Working hard saving some money and providing for a family should be important for a father.

6. I saw him run up the mountain jump off the cliff and land in a pine tree.

7. He was from Great Falls Montana and she was from Twin Falls Idaho.

8. I have been to Dubois Idaho Taber Alberta Canada and Whippany New Jersey.

9. She likes to sing to play the piano and to read novels.

10. The search party looked along the road up the hill and down the alleys for clues.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. Baseball, basketball, track, and tennis require running.

2. The numbers 8, 16, 32, and 48 are called even numbers.

3. Eat, drink, and make merry, for you will soon die.

4. I like shopping, my husband likes dining, and the family likes activities.

5. Working hard, saving some money, and providing for a family should be important for a father.

6. I saw him run up the mountain, jump off the cliff, and land in a pine tree.

7. He was from Great Falls, Montana, and she was from Twin Falls, Idaho.

8. I have been to Dubois, Idaho, Taber, Alberta, Canada, and Whippany, New Jersey.

9. She likes to sing, to play the piano, and to read novels.

10. The search party looked along the road, up the hill, and down the alleys for clues.

For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html. Our lessons are also available to purchase in an eBook and a Workbook format.

Friday, January 19, 2018

Lesson 350 - Mechanics - Punctuation - Commas

Use commas to separate a series of three or more short clauses. Example: I am working, he is sleeping, and she is singing. (The comma before the conjunction and is optional, but I prefer using it.)

Use no commas in a series when all items are joined by or, and, or nor.

Instructions: Place commas where they are needed.

1. They are eating we are drinking and you are starving.

2. The music began the lights dimmed and the curtains opened.

3. My sister has left home my brother is at school and my mother is baking bread.

4. Jim fished Jeff hiked and I loafed the whole campout.

5. You correct he proofreads but I edit material.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. They are eating, we are drinking, and you are starving.

2. The music began, the lights dimmed, and the curtains opened.

3. My sister has left home, my brother is at school, and my mother is baking bread.

4. Jim fished, Jeff hiked, and I loafed the whole campout.

5. You correct, he proofreads, but I edit material.

For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html. Our lessons are also available to purchase in eBook and Workbook format.

Thursday, January 18, 2018

Lesson 349 - Mechanics - Punctuation - Commas

Use commas to separate a series of three or more phrases. Example: He ran down the hall, out the door, and into the yard. (The comma before the conjunction and is optional, but I prefer using it.)

Use no commas in a series when all items are joined by or, and, or nor.

Instructions: Place commas where they are needed.

1. The rain splashed against the house onto the sidewalk and into the street.

2. Through the trees around the cabin and down the valley roared the wind.

3. College is to gain knowledge to make new friends and to prepare for a career.

4. The cat climbed up the tree and out on a limb and finally onto the roof.

5. Munching on an apple listening to a recording and sitting on the couch Martha looked very happy.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. against the house, onto the sidewalk, and into the street.

2. Through the trees, around the cabin, and down the valley,

3. to gain knowledge, to make new friends, and to prepare for a career.

4. no commas needed

5. Munching on an apple, listening to a recording, and sitting on the couch,

For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html. Our lessons are also available to purchase in an eBook and a Workbook format.

Wednesday, January 17, 2018

Lesson 348 - Mechanics - Punctuation - Commas

Use commas to separate a series of three or more numbers. Example: He called for numbers 3, 6, 9, and 12.

Instructions: Place commas where they are needed.

1. In the Bingo game the winning numbers were 7 21 35 46 and 72.

2. My combination for my lock is 3 54 and 26.

3. He said that his lucky numbers were 7 11 13 and 99.

4. The numbers 14 27 58 79 and 38 won the lottery.

5. I like mixed greens with numbers of 20 50 and 100 on them.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. 7, 21, 35, 46, and 72.

2. 3, 54, and 26.

3. 7, 11, 13, and 99.

4. 14, 27, 58, 79, and 38 won

5. 20, 50, and 100

For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html. Our lessons are also available to purchase in an eBook and a Workbook format.

Tuesday, January 16, 2018

Lesson 347 - Mechanics - Punctuation - Commas

Use commas to separate a series of three or more words. Example: I dropped my pencil, papers, and books. (The comma before the conjunction and is optional, but I prefer using it.)

Use no commas between two or more words usually thought of as being one item. Example: We ate hamburgers, pork and beans, and potato chips.

Use no commas in a series when all items are joined by or, and, or nor. Example: You dance and sing and play well.

Instructions: Place commas where they are needed.

1. I have seen many gold silver and copper mines.

2. People in the United States can travel by air rail or water.

3. The girl waved leaned over and fell into the pool.

4. My wife likes a meal of a glass of grape juice a fresh salad and spaghetti and meat balls.

5. At the resort we can hike and swim and ski all we want.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. gold, silver, and copper

2. air, rail, or water

3. waved, leaned over, and fell

4. a glass of grape juice, a fresh salad, and spaghetti and meat balls. (Spaghetti and meat balls are considered one item.)

5. no commas needed

For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html. Our lessons are also available to purchase in eBook and Workbook format.

Monday, January 15, 2018

Lesson 346 - Mechanics - Punctuation - Commas

Use commas to separate parts of geographical places. Example: Have you visited St. Louis, Missouri?

Instructions: Place commas where they are needed.

1. A neat place we visited was Custer Wyoming.

2. In Cody Wyoming there is an interesting museum.

3. I enjoyed the zoo in San Diego California.

4. We saw many bears in Waterton Alberta Canada.

5. The Black Hills are in South Dakota.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. Custer, Wyoming

2. Cody, Wyoming

3. San Diego, California

4. Waterton, Alberta, Canada

5. no commas needed

For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html. Our lessons are also available to purchase in an eBook and a Workbook format.

Saturday, January 13, 2018

Quiz for Lessons 341 - 345 - Mechanics - Punctuation - Commas

Instructions: Place commas where they are needed.

1. Most graciously

2. Dear Madam

3. Do you live at 431 North 500 West West Valley Utah 84098?

4. My birthday party is March 1 1976 at the golf course.

5. Monday February 2 is the day the groundhog looks for its shadow.

6. I lived at 368 Maple Avenue for a week.

7. May 1 was our wedding day.

8. Max Blaser Sr. is their neighbor in Tampa Florida.

9. Did you see Tom Jones Jr. at 430 East Plum Erda Colorado 35096 while on vacation?

10. During August all the leaves turn colors in Springfield Minnesota.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. Most graciously,

2. Dear Madam: (a business letter)

3. 431 North 500 West, West Valley, Utah 84098?

4. March 1, 1976, at

5. Monday, February 2,

6. (no comma needed - only one part)

7. (no comma needed - only one part)

8. Max Blaser, Sr., / Tampa, Florida.

9. Tom Jones, Jr., / 430 East Plum, Erda, Colorado 35096, while

10. Springfield, Minnesota

Next Lesson

For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html. Our lessons are also available to purchase in an eBook and a Workbook format.

Friday, January 12, 2018

Lesson 345 - Mechanics - Punctuation - Commas

Use a comma after the complimentary close of a friendly or business letter. Example: Sincerely yours,

Instructions: Place commas where they are needed in these complimentary closings.

1. Very truly yours

2. Affectionately yours

3. Yours lovingly

4. Your best customer

5. Cordially


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. Very truly yours,

2. Affectionately yours,

3. Yours lovingly,

4. Your best customer,

5. Cordially,

For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html. Our lessons are also available to purchase in eBook and Workbook format.

Thursday, January 11, 2018

Lesson 344 - Mechanics - Punctuation - Commas

Use a comma after the salutation of a friendly letter. Example: Dear Fred,

Instructions: Place commas where they are needed in these salutations.

1. Dear Aunt Vi

2. Dear Sir

3. Dear Mother

4. Gentlemen

5. My choicest friend


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. Dear Aunt Vi,

2. Dear Sir: (a business letter)

3. Dear Mother,

4. Gentlemen: (a business letter)

5. My choicest friend,

For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html. Our lessons are also available to purchase in an eBook and a Workbook format.

Wednesday, January 10, 2018

Lesson 343 - Mechanics - Punctuation - Commas

Use commas to set off the year in a date if three parts of date are given (month, day, year). Do not use commas if only two parts are given. Examples: I left May 23, 1958, at night. I know that July 1776 is an important date.

Instructions: Place commas where they are needed in these sentences.

1. Did you know that Thomas Jefferson died on July 4 1826?

2. On December 25 1961 I was in Brazil.

3. Their wedding day was June 24 1954 in Salt Lake City.

4. Where were you in November 1989?

5. On Friday August 14 1997 the accident happened.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. July 4, 1826?

2. December 25, 1961, I

3. June 24, 1954, in

4. no commas needed (only two parts)

5. Friday, August 14, 1997, the

For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html. Our lessons are also available to purchase in an eBook and a Workbook format.

Tuesday, January 9, 2018

Lesson 342 - Mechanics - Punctuation - Commas

Use a comma after the parts of an address. (The house number and street name form one part, and state and ZIP code number form one part.) Example: My new address is 1234 North Main, Salt Lake City, Utah 84007.

Place no comma after the last part if it ends the sentence.

Instructions: Place commas where they are needed in these sentences.

1. John wrote to me from 462 Beacon Lane Cleveland Ohio 76504.

2. My sister lives at 635 Cherry Street Lexington Kentucky.

3. Ray Alber 876 Elm Drive Detroit Michigan 48300 is the person to contact.

4. Write them at 15 Oak Avenue Limorick Illinois 60614 today.

5. Jim's summer address will be Box 254 Grantsville Iowa 50689.


--For answers scroll down.












Answers:


1. 462 Beacon Lane, Cleveland, Ohio 76504.

2. 635 Cherry Street, Lexington, Kentucky.

3. Ray Alber, 876 Elm Drive, Detroit, Michigan 48300, is

4. 15 Oak Avenue, Limorick, Illinois 60614, today.

5. Box 254, Grantsville, Iowa 50689.

For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html. Our lessons are also available to purchase in eBook and Workbook format.

Monday, January 8, 2018

Lesson 341 - Mechanics - Punctuation - Commas

Use a comma or commas to set off the abbreviations Jr., Sr., and Esq. Example: Carl Harris, Jr., is here now.

Instructions: Place commas where they are needed in these sentences.

1. I met Count Dracula Sr. the famous ghoul.

2. The letter was sent to Sir Thomas Mason Esq.

3. Did you see Reed Fitzgerald Jr. starring in that television show?

4. Mr. Sam Adams Sr. and Michael Gold Jr. race cars for a living.

5. Andrew Paskett Esq. was featured in the latest magazine issue.


--For answers scroll down.












Answers:


1. Dracula, Sr.,

2. Mason, Esq. (There is no comma when Jr., Sr., or Esq. is used at the end of a sentence.)

3. Fitzgerald, Jr.,

4. Adams, Sr., / Gold, Jr.,

5. Paskett, Esq.,

For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html. Our lessons are also available to purchase in an eBook and a Workbook format.

Saturday, January 6, 2018

Quiz for Lessons 336 - 340 - Mechanics - Punctuation - Periods

Use a period after initials used in names. Examples: E. F. Smith, Helen R. Hunsaker, W. James Swift

Use a period after the abbreviations Mr., Mrs., Ms., Dr., and St. (Saint) before a name and Jr., Sr., and Esq., after a name. Do not use a period with Miss because it is not an abbreviation.

Special abbreviations or initials need a period. Example: C.O.D. (cash on delivery) (Many abbreviations and acronyms, especially government agencies, now do not use periods and the abbreviations may be found written in several forms. Example: miles per hour = mph, m.p.h., Mph, MPH) For our purposes we will use periods with abbreviations to be consistent.

Use a period with abbreviations used with figures showing time. Examples: A.M., P.M., B.C., and A.D.

Use a period to show decimals and dollars and cents. Examples: This costs $6.99. Two and one half is written 2.5.

Instructions: Put the correct punctuation where needed in the following sentences.

1. Mr and Mrs Rodney C Snow were honored at the dinner

2. Ten and three quarters is 1075 in decimals

3. Did you study the period from 100 B C to A D 200 in your history class

4. I have heard of St Francis of Assisi

5. Add together 825 and 175 in decimals which should equal ten.

6. Miss Claire S Queen and Dr A Z King, Jr , will be married at 10:00 A M

7. Dan P Morgan, Esq , and Ms Luella K Larson knew the famous P T Barnum.

8. The trip cost $33650 (three hundred thirty-six dollars and fifty cents) for gasoline alone.

9. I feel sorry for the B S A organization

10. It seems that they take so much from my check for F I C A


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. Mr. / Mrs. / C. / period at end of sentence

2. 10.75 / period at end of sentence

3. B.C. / A.D. / question mark at end of sentence

4. St. / period or exclamation point at end of sentence

5. 8.25 / 1.75

6. S. / Dr. A. Z. / Jr. / A.M.

7. P. / Esq. / Ms. / K. / P.T.

8. $336.50

9. B.S.A. / exclamation point or period at the end of sentence

10. F.I.C.A.

For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html. Our lessons are also available to purchase in an eBook and a Workbook format.

Friday, January 5, 2018

Lesson 340 - Mechanics - Punctuation - Periods

Use a period to show decimals, dollars, and cents. Examples: This costs $6.99. Two and one half is written 2.5.

Instructions: Put periods where needed in the following sentences.

1. In decimals, 225 would mean two and one fourth.

2. That new saddle will cost us $72933. (seven hundred twenty-nine dollars and thirty-three cents)

3. The little girl paid $025 (twenty-five cents) for the sucker, and the boy paid $059 (fifty-nine cents) for the candy bar.

4. In decimals, four and ninety-nine hundredths is written 499.

5. Seven and two thirds is written 767.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. 2.25

2. $729.33

3. $0.25 / $0.59

4. 4.99

5. 7.67

For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html. Our lessons are also available to purchase in eBook and Workbook format.

Thursday, January 4, 2018

Lesson 339 - Mechanics - Punctuation - Periods

Use a period with abbreviations used with figures showing time. Examples: A.M., P.M., B.C., and A.D.

Instructions: Put periods where needed in the following sentences.

1. I was born in A D 1940.

2. Be here at 4:30 A M , or you will not see me until 9:45 P M

3. What happened in A D 1776 that was of great importance?

4. People living in 2000 B C did not enjoy all that we have today.

5. Class starts promptly at 8:00 A M


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. A.D.

2. A.M. / P.M.

3. A.D.

4. B.C.

5. A.M.

(Notice that when a period is used for an abbreviation or some other reason at the end of the sentence, you do not need a second one to end the sentence. The one period does double duty.)

For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html. Our lessons are also available to purchase in an eBook and a Workbook format.

Wednesday, January 3, 2018

Lesson 338 - Mechanics - Punctuation - Periods

Special abbreviations or initials need a period. Example: C.O.D. (cash on delivery) (Many abbreviations and acronyms, especially government agencies, now do not use periods and the abbreviations may be found written in several forms. Example: miles per hour = mph, m.p.h., Mph, MPH) For our purposes we will use periods with abbreviations to be consistent.

Instructions: Put periods where needed in the following sentences.

1. I will send the package C O D to M I T

2. The soldier got lost returning to base but was considered A W O L

3. Dr Hill is really a D D S

4. U S S R no longer exists since it has been divided into several smaller countries.

5. I want to join the U S N and become a Navy seal.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. C.O.D. / M.I.T.

2. A.W.O.L.

3. Dr. / D.D.S.

4. U.S.S.R.

5. U.S.N.

(Notice that when a period is used for an abbreviation or some other reason at the end of the sentence, you do not need a second one to end the sentence. The one period does double duty.)

For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html. Our lessons are also available to purchase in an eBook and a Workbook format.

Tuesday, January 2, 2018

Lesson 337 - Mechanics - Punctuation - Periods

Use a period after the abbreviations Mr., Mrs., Ms., Dr., and St. (Saint) before a name and Jr., Sr., and Esq., after a name. Do not use a period with Miss because it is not an abbreviation.

Instructions: Put periods where needed in the following sentences.

1. Mr Samuel H White spoke at the celebration last night.

2. Mr and Mrs J B Smythe and their son J B Smythe, Jr , will be at the opening ceremonies.

3. Have you been to St Petersburg and St Louis?

4. Dr Leonard J Arrington was a great historian

5. Ms P T Roberts and Mr John J Jones, Esq will speak at tomorrow's meeting.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. Mr. / H.

2. Mr. / Mrs. J. B. / J. B. Jr.

3. St. / St.

4. Dr. / J. / The end of the sentence needs a period.

5. Ms. P. T. / Mr. / J. / Esq.

For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html. Our lessons are also available to purchase in eBook and Workbook format.

Monday, January 1, 2018

Lesson 336 - Mechanics - Punctuation - Periods

Use a period after initials used in names. Examples: E. F. Smith, Helen R. Hunsaker, W. James Swift

Instructions: Put periods where needed in the following sentences.

1. B D Hibler and Gene W Riding started a new company

2. I know K Malone and J Stockton play for the Utah Jazz.

3. Clara B Walters and Ann J Frampton are sisters.

4. C S Lewis is an interesting author to read.

5. I think names with more than two initials like J R R Tolkien are interesting names.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. B. D. / W. / The end of the sentence needs a period.

2. K. / J.

3. B. / J.

4. C. S.

5. J. R. R.

For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html. Our lessons are also available to purchase in an eBook and a Workbook format.

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