Tuesday, April 17, 2018

Lesson 397 - Mechanics - Punctuation - Italics/Underlining

Material that is italicized in print or by computer is underlined in typewritten or hand written work.

Italicize figures, letters, signs and words referred to as words. Example: How many j's are there in your brother's name?

Instructions: Italicize those words, figures, letters, or signs which need italics in these sentences.

1. Have you crossed your t's and dotted your i's?

2. I am tired of all your answers being wait.

3. Do not use &'s in place of and's in your paper.

4. Your m's look like w's most of the time.

5. There are three 5's in her phone number.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. Have you crossed your t's and dotted your i's?

2. I am tired of all your answers being wait.

3. Do not use &'s in place of and's in your paper.

4. Your m's look like w's most of the time.

5. There are three 5's in her phone number.

For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html. Our lessons are also available to purchase in eBook and Workbook format.

Monday, April 16, 2018

Lesson 396 - Mechanics - Punctuation - Italics/Underlining

Material that is italicized in print or by computer is underlined in typewritten or hand written work.

Italicize foreign words not yet accepted as part of our language. Example: Do this tout de suite.

Instructions: Italicize those words which need italics in these sentences.

1. Sarah likes the expression tout a fait.

2. Have you ever noticed how tempus fugit?

3. Everyone has heard c'est la vie.

4. Tanto faz is my favorite foreign phrase.

5. Some people always have to have the dernier cri.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. Sarah likes the expression tout a fait.

2. Have you ever noticed how tempus fugit?

3. Everyone has heard c'est la vie.

4. Tanto faz is my favorite foreign phrase.

5. Some people always have to have the dernier cri.

For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html. Our lessons are also available to purchase in an eBook and a Workbook format.

Saturday, April 14, 2018

Quiz for Lessons 391 - 395 - Mechanics - Punctuation - Colons

Instructions: Place colons where needed.

1. Dear Chairman

2. There are four classes of poetic meter classified as follows iambic, trochaic, anapestic, and dactylic.

3. For this poll we need men, women and children.

4. The following are the three football positions that never carry the ball guard, tackle and center.

5. The polls close promptly at 800 P.M.

6. I just read Job 1414.

7. Volume 20 pages 22-28 had the material that I needed.

8. Jared showed that he was better prepared He was wearing thermal clothes.

9. Have you read The Work and the Glory So Great a Cause?

10. Consider Franklin D. Roosevelt's words to Congress "We have had the lesson before us over and over again -- nations that were not ready and were unable to get ready found themselves overrun by the enemy."


--For answers scroll down.












Answers:

1. Dear Chairman:

2. There are four classes of poetic meter classified as follows: iambic, trochaic, anapestic, and dactylic.

3. No colons needed. They are direct objects.

4. The following are the three football positions that never carry the ball: guard, tackle and center.

5. The polls close promptly at 8:00 P.M.

6. I just read Job 14:14.

7. Volume 20: pages 22-28 had the material that I needed.

8. Jared showed that he was better prepared: He was wearing thermal clothes.

9. Have you read The Work and the Glory: So Great a Cause?

10. Consider Franklin D. Roosevelt's words to Congress: "We have had the lesson before us over and over again -- nations that were not ready and were unable to get ready found themselves overrun by the enemy."

For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html. Our lessons are also available to purchase in an eBook and a Workbook format.

Friday, April 13, 2018

Lesson 395 - Mechanics - Punctuation - Colons

Instructions: Place colons where needed.

1. The statement from "Gargantua" "Half the world does not know how the other half lives." is still true today.

2. I recall Emerson's words "If a man can write a better book, preach a better sermon, or make a better mouse-trap than his neighbor, though he builds his house in the woods, the world will make a beaten path to his door."

3. I am concerned about my mother She is not eating enough.

4. The meeting must include the following people Mark, Jay, Chris, and Rulon.

5. My daughters-in-law are Martha, Mary, Jane, and Jen.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. The statement from "Gargantua": "Half the world does not know how the other half lives." is still true today.

2. I recall Emerson's words: "If a man can write a better book, preach a better sermon, or make a better mouse-trap than his neighbor, though he builds his house in the woods, the world will make a beaten path to his door."

3. I am concerned about my mother: She is not eating enough.

4. The meeting must include the following people: Mark, Jay, Chris, and Rulon.

5. No colon needed. They are predicate nominatives.

For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html. Our lessons are also available to purchase in eBook and Workbook format.

Thursday, April 12, 2018

Lesson 394 - Mechanics - Punctuation - Colons

Place a colon outside of quotation marks. Example: That reminds me of a line from "A Psalm of Life": "Let us, then, be up and doing."

Instructions: Place colons where needed.

1. When offered an alcoholic drink, one should remember Martial's line in "A Total Abstainer" "No, I really don't care for a drink."

2. Do you remember the quote from "Carpe Diem" "This day's thine own; the next may be denied."

3. A man and a wife should use a line from "The Task" "With all thy faults, I love thee still."

4. Do you agree with this line from "Lacon" "Imitation is the sincerest of flattery."?

5. Whittier says in "Ichabod" "When faith is lost, when honor dies, The man is dead!"


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. When offered an alcoholic drink, one should remember Martial's line in "A Total Abstainer": "No, I really don't care for a drink."

2. Do you remember the quote from "Carpe Diem": "This day's thine own; the next may be denied."

3. A man and a wife should use a line from "The Task": "With all thy faults, I love thee still."

4. Do you agree with this line from "Lacon": "Imitation is the sincerest of flattery."?

5. Whittier says in "Ichabod": "When faith is lost, when honor dies, The man is dead!"

For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html. Our lessons are also available to purchase in an eBook and a Workbook format.

Wednesday, April 11, 2018

Lesson 393 - Mechanics - Punctuation - Colons

Use a colon to introduce a long or formal quotation.

Instructions: Place colons where needed.

1. I like the words of Emerson "The true test of civilization is not the census, nor the size of cities, nor the crops--no, but the kind of man the country turns out."

2. The letter to his firm began as follows "Gentlemen We received your last order in May, 1998."

3. Article l, Section l of the Constitution of the United States reads "All legislative powers herein granted shall be vested in a Congress of the United States, which shall consist of a Senate and a House of Representatives."

4. The councilman began with these words "If we don't act now and work together, our city faces economic ruin, physical deterioration, and cultural decline. The issues are critical, and the system of government under which we now function must be changed."

5. He said "I will join your group tomorrow."


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. I like the words of Emerson: "The true test of civilization is not the census, nor the size of cities, nor the crops--no, but the kind of man the country turns out."

2. The letter to his firm began as follows: "Gentlemen: We received your last order in May, 1998." (Two colons)

3. Article l, Section l of the Constitution of the United States reads: "All legislative powers herein granted shall be vested in a Congress of the United States, which shall consist of a Senate and a House of Representatives."

4. The councilman began with these words: "If we don't act now and work together, our city faces economic ruin, physical deterioration, and cultural decline. The issues are critical, and the system of government under which we now function must be changed."

5. He said, "I will join your group tomorrow." (use only a comma since the quote is not long nor formal.)

For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html. Our lessons are also available to purchase in an eBook and a Workbook format.

Tuesday, April 10, 2018

Lesson 392 - Mechanics - Punctuation - Colons

Use a colon to separate two complete sentences when the second sentence explains, amplifies, or illustrates the first. Example: Jim had a good idea: He wanted to consult with the builder.

Instructions: Place colons where needed.

1. There has been no change in our plans We will leave at 1000 P.M.

2. He stated his plans He would borrow money; he would secure a plane; he would fly around the world.

3. That morning the people saw the problem During the night a tree had downed the power lines.

4. Now the men knew what to do The pressure would be increased in the foward compartment.

5. They were worried about Fred He would fall asleep at work and spend too much time alone.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. There has been no change in our plans: We will leave at 10:00 P.M. (two colons)

2. He stated his plans: He would borrow money; he would secure a plane; he would fly around the world.

3. That morning the people saw the problem: During the night a tree had downed the power lines.

4. Now the men knew what to do: The pressure would be increased in the foward compartment.

5. They were worried about Fred: He would fall asleep at work and spend too much time alone.

For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html. Our lessons are also available to purchase in eBook and Workbook format.

Monday, April 9, 2018

Lesson 391 - Mechanics - Punctuation - Colons

Use a colon before listed items that are introduced by such words as the following, as follows, thus, and these; by a number; or by any other expression that "points-out." Example: In high school he played the following sports: baseball, basketball, football and tennis.

Use no colon before a list of predicate nominatives, direct objects, or objects of the preposition. A colon should not hinder the natural flow of the sentence. Example: We will need flour, milk, and sugar. (direct objects)

Instructions: Place colons where needed.

1. You need these guys Will, Boyd, Jeff, and Jim.

2. She had three personality flaws pride, selfishness, and a temper.

3. The singers will be you, Pam, and Becky.

4. For the campout we will need the following things a tent, three sleeping bags, and a gas lantern.

5. Next semester I will be taking four courses Algebra II, English Literature, American History, and Biology III.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. You need these guys: Will, Boyd, Jeff, and Jim.

2. She had three personality flaws: pride, selfishness, and a temper.

3. No colon needed. They are predicate nominatives

4. For the campout we will need the following things: a tent, three sleeping bags, and a gas lantern.

5. Next semester I will be taking four courses: Algebra II, English Literature, American History, and Biology III.

For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html. Our lessons are also available to purchase in an eBook and a Workbook format.

Saturday, April 7, 2018

Quiz for Lessons 386 - 390 - Mechanics - Punctuation - Colons

Instructions: Place colons where needed.

1. That statement can be found in Volume I pages 98-100 of The Raven The Life of Sam Houston.

2. Dear Harmon's

3. I like what it says in James 520.

4. Dear Sirs

5. I will be here at 1200 P.M. for my money.

6. I enjoyed reading The Army of the Potomac A Stillness at Appomattox by Bruce Catton.

7. I couldn't find it in Volume IX pages 3-6.

8. Thanksgiving dinner will be at our place at 230 P.M.

9. A good college text was The American Constitution Its Origins and Development.

10. Revelation 62-8 talks about the four horsemen of the apocalypse.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. That statement can be found in Volume I: pages 98-100 of The Raven: The Life of Sam Houston.

2. Dear Harmon's:

3. I like what it says in James 5:20.

4. Dear Sirs:

5. I will be here at 12:00 P.M. for my money.

6. I enjoyed reading The Army of the Potomac: A Stillness at Appomattox by Bruce Catton.

7. I couldn't find it in Volume IX: pages 3-6.

8. Thanksgiving dinner will be at our place at 2:30 P.M.

9. A good college text was The American Constitution: Its Origins and Development.

10. Revelation 6:2-8 talks about the four horsemen of the apocalypse.

For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html. Our lessons are also available to purchase in an eBook and a Workbook format.

Friday, April 6, 2018

Lesson 390 - Mechanics - Punctuation - Colons

Use a colon between the numbers referring to volume and the pages of books and magazines. Example: It is found in Volume II: pages 22-23.

Instructions: Place colons where needed.

1. That statement can be found in Volume X pages 198-200.

2. I found that information in Volume 54 pages 31-34.

3. Look in that magazine Volume 24 pages 3-4.

4. Volume VI pages 245-247 will have the information that you need.

5. Check the encyclopedia Volume 20 pages 105 -106.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. That statement can be found in Volume X: pages 198-200.

2. I found that information in Volume 54: pages 31-34.

3. Look in that magazine Volume 24: pages 3-4.

4. Volume VI: pages 245-247 will have the information that you need.

5. Check the encyclopedia Volume 20: pages 105 -106.

For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html. Our lessons are also available to purchase in eBook and Workbook format.

Thursday, April 5, 2018

Lesson 389 - Mechanics - Punctuation - Colons

Use a colon between the title and subtitle of a book. Example: The Wide World: A High School Geography

Instructions: Place colons where needed.

1. Have you examined for possible adoption Warriner's English Grammar and Composition Complete Course?

2. The Advanced Composition A Book of Models for Writing has been used for many years.

3. I didn't like Episodes in American History An Inquiry Approach as a history text.

4. Men and Nations A World History covers what we need very well.

5. The American Nation A History of the United States seems too advanced for our grade level.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. Have you examined for possible adoption Warriner's English Grammar and Composition: Complete Course?

2. The Advanced Composition: A Book of Models for Writing has been used for many years.

3. I didn't like Episodes in American History: An Inquiry Approach as a history text.

4. Men and Nations: A World History covers what we need very well.

5. The American Nation: A History of the United States seems too advanced for our grade level.

For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html. Our lessons are also available to purchase in an eBook and a Workbook format.

Wednesday, April 4, 2018

Lesson 388 - Mechanics - Punctuation - Colons

Use a colon to separate chapter and verse referring to a specific Bible selection. Example: Everyone should follow Proverbs 3:5.

Instructions: Place colons where needed.

1. What is the meaning of Job 57?

2. Micah 68 is an often quoted verse.

3. Isaiah 96 is a verse used at Christmas time.

4. I think that Malachi 310 is ignored by most of the Christian world.

5. One of my favorite verses is Matthew 633.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. What is the meaning of Job 5:7?

2. Micah 6:8 is an often quoted verse.

3. Isaiah 9:6 is a verse used at Christmas time.

4. I think that Malachi 3:10 is ignored by most of the Christian world.

5. One of my favorite verses is Matthew 6:33.

For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html. Our lessons are also available to purchase in an eBook and a Workbook format.

Tuesday, April 3, 2018

Lesson 387 - Mechanics - Punctuation - Colons

Use a colon to express the hours and minutes in figures. Example: 12:30 A.M.

Instructions: Place colons where needed.

1. We will meet at 800 A.M. tomorrow morning.

2. I will be on the plane at 1153 P.M.

3. Which would be better for you, 1000 A.M. or 200 P.M?

4. Be in my office promptly at 1035 A.M.

5. You never get to bed before 1130 P.M.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. We will meet at 8:00 A.M. tomorrow morning.

2. I will be on the plane at 11:53 P.M.

3. Which would be better for you, 10:00 A.M. or 2:00 P.M?

4. Be in my office promptly at 10:35 A.M.

5. You never get to bed before 11:30 P.M.

For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html. Our lessons are also available to purchase in eBook and Workbook format.

Monday, April 2, 2018

Lesson 386 - Mechanics - Punctuation - Colons

Use a colon after the salutation of a business letter. Example: Dear Sir:

Instructions: Place colons where needed.

1. Dear Mr. Witt

2. Dear Madam

3. My dear Mrs. Garrity

4. Gentlemen

5. To whom it may concern


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. Dear Mr. Witt:

2. Dear Madam:

3. My dear Mrs. Garrity:

4. Gentlemen:

5. To whom it may concern:

For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html. Our lessons are also available to purchase in an eBook and a Workbook format.

Saturday, March 24, 2018

Quiz for Lessons 381 - 385 - Mechanics - Punctuation - Semicolons

Instructions: Place semicolons where they are needed in the following sentences.

1. I am looking for the poem "The Path Not Taken" I need it tomorrow.

2. Jim sings bass Jeff, tenor.

3. I have visited Riverside, California, Atlantic City, New Jersey, and Butte, Montana.

4. I will steal, cheat, and lie for you but I will not kill for you.

5. There was a sudden noise everything stopped immediately.

6. Although we may need more time, I believe we will be victorious and I believe you feel that way, too.

7. We can trust him implicitly nevertheless, we should not be careless.

8. The house looked like what we wanted on the other hand, we had not been inside.

9. I had food, clothing, and furniture but I didn't have my family.

10. He was such a "klutz" I couldn't stand him.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. I am looking for the poem "The Path Not Taken"; I need it tomorrow.

2. Jim sings bass; Jeff, tenor.

3. I have visited Riverside, California; Atlantic City, New Jersey; and Butte, Montana.

4. I will steal, cheat, and lie for you; but I will not kill for you.

5. There was a sudden noise; everything stopped immediately.

6. Although we may need more time, I believe we will be victorious; and I believe you feel that way, too.

7. We can trust him implicitly; nevertheless, we should not be careless.

8. The house looked like what we wanted; on the other hand, we had not been inside.

9. I had food, clothing, and furniture; but I didn't have my family.

10. He was such a "klutz"; I couldn't stand him.

For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html. Our lessons are also available to purchase in an eBook and a Workbook format.

Friday, March 23, 2018

Lesson 385 - Mechanics - Punctuation - Semicolons

Place a semicolon outside of quotation marks. Example: I have just read "Jabberwocky"; are you familiar with it?

Instructions: Place semicolons where they are needed in the following sentences.

1. Joe is considered "simpatico" Frank is "feio."

2. Terry was wearing "glad rags" Martha, her "threads" Mary, her "duds."

3. I read the poem "Mending Wall" Don read a novel.

4. The car went "bork, bork" the train sounded like "shoosh, shoosh" the plane went "ka-boom."

5. Although it was too late, Jim shouted, "Look out!" and I said, "Duck!"


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. Joe is considered "simpatico"; Frank is "feio."

2. Terry was wearing "glad rags"; Martha, her "threads"; Mary, her "duds."

3. I read the poem "Mending Wall"; Don read a novel.

4. The car went "bork, bork"; the train sounded like "shoosh, shoosh"; the plane went "ka-boom."

5. Although it was too late, Jim shouted "Look out!"; and I said "Duck!"

For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html. Our lessons are also available to purchase in eBook and Workbook format.

Thursday, March 22, 2018

Lesson 384 - Mechanics - Punctuation - Semicolons

Use a semicolon to separate phrases or clauses of equal rank which contain commas. The semicolon in such sentences brings clarity of meaning. Example: We have lived in Logan, Utah; Las Vegas, Nevada; and Rio Claro, Brazil.

Instructions: Place semicolons where they are needed in the following sentences.

1. The new in-laws are Jay, Pam's husband, Are', Will's wife, and Mark, Terri's husband.

2. For the campout we took our raincoats, boots, and tarp, but we didn't use them.

3. The mayor of the city, who attended the conference, gave a report, and he suggested several ways to save money.

4. My son is a medical technician, my daughter, a postal worker, and my wife, an editor.

5. The class officers are Fred Ogden, president, Dan Royal, vice-president, and Jayne Allen, secretary.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. The new in-laws are Jay, Pam's husband; Are', Will's wife; and Mark, Terri's husband.

2. For the campout we took our raincoats, boots, and tarp; but we didn't use them.

3. The mayor of the city, who attended the conference, gave a report; and he suggested several ways to save money.

4. My son is a medical technician; my daughter, a postal worker; and my wife, an editor.

5. The class officers are Fred Ogden, president; Dan Royal, vice-president; and Jayne Allen, secretary.

For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html. Our lessons are also available to purchase in an eBook and a Workbook format.

Wednesday, March 21, 2018

Lesson 383 - Mechanics - Punctuation - Semicolons

Use a semicolon before a conjunctive adverb that introduces a clause in a compound sentence.

Common conjunctive adverbs are therefore, nevertheless, moreover, consequently, furthermore, besides, then, thus, instead, accordingly, otherwise, so, yet, still, hence, however. Example: Jill knew she could not win; nevertheless, she kept running.

Explanatory expressions (for example, namely, on the contrary, in fact, that is, on the other hand) are used similarly as conjunctive adverbs with a semicolon preceding them and a comma following. Example: The weather was wonderful; in fact, it was the best weather for a month.

Instructions: Place semicolons where they are needed in the following sentences.

1. I have not heard the latest comments therefore, I cannot render an opinion.

2. Our children have traveled throughout the world for example, Australia, Brazil, Korea, and Russia.

3. In Brazil we have seen many places on the other hand, we have never been to Africa.

4. We plan to return some day to Brazil therefore, we want to visit Rio, Sao Paulo, and Manaus.

5. Barbara is a diligent student she, in fact, is tops in her class.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. I have not heard the latest comments; therefore, I cannot render an opinion.

2. Our children have traveled throughout the world; for example, Australia, Brazil, Korea, and Russia.

3. In Brazil we have seen many places; on the other hand, we have never been to Africa.

4. We plan to return some day to Brazil; therefore, we want to visit Rio, Sao Paulo, and Manaus.

5. Barbara is a diligent student; she, in fact, is tops in her class.

For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html. Our lessons are also available to purchase in an eBook and a Workbook format.

Tuesday, March 20, 2018

Lesson 382 - Mechanics - Punctuation - Semicolons

Use a semicolon between the two independent clauses of a compound sentence joined by a coordinate conjunction if commas are also used in the sentence. Example: Although the story is impossible, I believe you; and the others will, too.

Instructions: Place semicolons where they are needed in the following sentences.

1. Since you asked my opinion, I will tell you and I hope you will listen well.

2. Although he is highly qualified, he is not dependable and I am afraid to hire him.

3. Because Sarah is absent a great deal, she has a hard time keeping up but she is willing to work overtime.

4. Although I prefer English, I know that math is important and I will work hard in both classes.

5. When you arrive on the train, take a taxi to the bus station or I can meet you at the train.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. Since you asked my opinion, I will tell you; and I hope you will listen well.

2. Although he is highly qualified, he is not dependable; and I am afraid to hire him.

3. Because Sarah is absent a great deal, she has a hard time keeping up; but she is willing to work overtime.

4. Although I prefer English, I know that math is important; and I will work hard in both classes.

5. When you arrive on the train, take a taxi to the bus station; or I can meet you at the train.

For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html. Our lessons are also available to purchase in eBook and Workbook format.

Monday, March 19, 2018

Lesson 381 - Mechanics - Punctuation - Semicolons

Use a semicolon between two independent clauses of a compound sentence when they are not joined by a coordinate conjunction. Example: There was a sudden silence; everyone was stunned by the outcome.

Instructions: Place semicolons where they are needed in the following sentences.

1. Carl is tall his brother is short.

2. He knocked several times no one came to the door.

3. The siren blew loudly I rushed to the window the police raced pass as I looked out.

4. I waited several hours for you you did not return I became concerned.

5. My sister loves mysteries my brother likes technical manuals.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. Carl is tall; his brother is short.

2. He knocked several times; no one came to the door.

3. The siren blew loudly; I rushed to the window; the police raced past as I looked out.

4. I waited several hours for you; you did not return; I became concerned.

5. My sister loves mysteries; my brother likes technical manuals.

For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html. Our lessons are also available to purchase in an eBook and a Workbook format.

Saturday, March 17, 2018

Quiz for Lessons 376 - 380 - Mechanics - Punctuation - Quotation Marks

Instructions: Rewrite the following, changing all indirect quotations to direct quotations and punctuating and paragraphing them correctly.

We had an interesting discussion last night. Mr. James who is a quiet, unassuming man said that he hasn't read about the election. I am afraid that I trust no one. Pam asked if he had voted for the president in the election. She said that everyone should vote each time. He replied that he had voted this time, but didn't think his vote would count for much. She asked if he had read in a popular magazine the article Every Vote Counts. We now know that every vote counts! Mr. James stated that he never knows how to vote. He needs to find an expert. Pam laughed and told him that he could come to her since the experts on television never agree on anything. I know better than the experts!


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

(The following answer is not the only way that you could correct the writing, but it will give some idea as to what should be done with the paragraph.)

We had an interesting discussion last night. Mr. James who is a quiet, unassuming man said, "I haven't read about the election. I am afraid that I trust no one."

Pam asked, "Did you vote for the president in the election? Everyone should vote each time."

He replied, "I voted this time, but I don't think my vote will count for much."

She asked, "Have you read in a popular magazine the article 'Every Vote Counts'? We now know that every vote counts!"

Mr. James stated, "I never know how to vote. I need to find an 'expert.'"

Pam laughed and told him, "You could come to me since the 'experts' on television never agree on anything. I know better than the 'experts'!"

For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html. Our lessons are also available to purchase in an eBook and a Workbook format.

Friday, March 16, 2018

Lesson 380 - Mechanics - Punctuation - Quotation Marks

Place question marks and exclamation points inside quotation marks if they are part of the quotation. Place question marks and exclamation points outside the quotation marks if they pertain to more than the quotation.

Examples: Jim asked, "Where are you going?" Did Ann say, "I won't do it"?
"Are you sure!" exclaimed Becky. How happy she was to say, "I do"!

Instructions: Use quotation marks where needed in these sentences.

1. When Dad said that we were going camping, I shouted, What a great idea!

2. Mary asked, When are you going?

3. Didn't you hear me say, I will think about it?

4. Didn't you hear the policeman shout, Stop!?

5. We need protection from his kindness!


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. When Dad said that we were going camping, I shouted, "What a great idea!"

2. Mary asked, "When are you going?"

3. Didn't you hear me say, "I will think about it"?

4. Didn't you hear the policeman shout, "Stop!"?

5. We need protection from his "kindness"!

For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html. Our lessons are also available to purchase in eBook and Workbook format.

Thursday, March 15, 2018

Lesson 379 - Mechanics - Punctuation - Quotation Marks

Always place commas and periods inside quotation marks. Example: One famous painting is "The Song of the Lark."

Instructions: Use quotation marks where needed in these sentences.

1. I like the sea poem The Revenge.

2. I had hoped, said Bob, that you would be in the play.

3. I enjoyed the story The Milk Pitcher, the short story about baseball and a cow.

4. Yes, Captain Smith said, we can go sailing.

5. You never answer anything with the word yes.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. I like the sea poem "The Revenge."

2. "I had hoped," said Bob, "that you would be in the play."

3. I enjoyed the story "The Milk Pitcher," the short story about baseball and a cow.

4. "Yes," Captain Smith said, "we can go sailing."

5. You never answer anything with the word "yes."

For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html. Our lessons are also available to purchase in an eBook and a Workbook format.

Wednesday, March 14, 2018

Lesson 378 - Mechanics - Punctuation - Quotation Marks

Use quotation marks to set off words or phrases used in a special sense: technical, ironical, coined, slang, and words used as words in informal writing. Examples: Grant always uses the word "terrific." The car driving slowly down the street went "ka-lunk! ka-lunk!"

Instructions: Use quotation marks where needed in these sentences.

1. Show us how you are the expert.

2. The delegates ended their peace talks with much angry shouting.

3. I know we can make that jalopy into a great hot rod.

4. The boss is going to can us all if we don't get on the ball.

5. Why do you always say the word excellent to every statement?


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. Show us how you are the "expert."

2. The delegates ended their "peace talks" with much angry shouting.

3. I know we can make that "jalopy" into a great "hot rod."

4. The boss is going to "can" us all if we don't "get on the ball."

5. Why do you always say the word "excellent" to every statement?

For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html. Our lessons are also available to purchase in an eBook and a Workbook format.

Tuesday, March 13, 2018

Lesson 377 - Mechanics - Punctuation - Quotation Marks

Use single quotation marks for a quotation within a quotation. Example: "Dad always says, 'Maybe,'" cried Pam.

Instructions: Use quotation marks where needed in these sentences.

1. Have you read The Scarlet Ibis, a very good short story? asked the teacher.

2. He replied, I know she said, I am not sure.

3. Everyone will read the chapter entitled Africa for tomorrow, commanded the substitute teacher.

4. The witness answered, I heard the officer say Put down the gun!

5. This famous painting Square Sunlight has won many awards, stated the guide.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. "Have you read 'The Scarlet Ibis,' a very good short story?" asked the teacher.

2. He replied, "I know she said, 'I am not sure.'"

3. "Everyone will read the chapter entitled 'Africa' for tomorrow," commanded the substitute teacher.

4. The witness answered, "I heard the officer say 'Put down the gun!'"

5. "This famous painting 'Square Sunlight' has won many awards," stated the guide.

For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html. Our lessons are also available to purchase in eBook and Workbook format.

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