Saturday, February 11, 2017

Quiz for Lessons 121 - 125 - Parts of the Sentence - Transitive and Intransitive Verbs

Instructions: Tell whether the verbs in the following sentences are transitive active, transitive passive, intransitive linking, or intransitive complete.

1. The programs had been printed.

2. Jeff opened the door for his mother.

3. The parade began on time.

4. The weather has been very warm in November.

5. Mr. Johanson is an interesting person.

6. Winter lasts too long for me.

7. The beach was used by the entire town.

8. The apples had a sour taste.

9. Time passes rapidly during our vacation.

10. The jury made the right decision.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. had been printed - transitive passive

2. opened - transitive active

3. began - intransitive complete

4. has been - intransitive linking

5. is - intransitive linking

6. lasts - intransitive linking or intransitive complete

7. was used - transitive passive

8. had - transitive active

9. passes - intransitive complete

10. made - transitive active

For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html. Our lessons are also available to purchase in an eBook and a Workbook format.

Friday, February 10, 2017

Lesson 125 - Parts of the Sentence - Transitive and Intransitive Verbs

Transitive verbs are verbs that have subjects or objects that receive the action. They are either active voice or passive voice. Transitive active verbs are the verbs in sentences with a direct object. Example: The boy kicked the ball. The subject is the doer and the direct object is the receiver of the action. Transitive passive verbs have the subject receiving the action with the doer in a prepositional phrase or omitted in the sentence. Examples: The ball was kicked by the boy. The ball was kicked hard. The verb in the transitive passive voice always has is, am, are, was, were, be, being, or been as an auxiliary or helping verb.

Intransitive verbs have no receiver of the action. They are classified as intransitive complete or intransitive linking. Intransitive linking are sentences with a predicate nominative or predicate adjective. Examples: The girl is Mary. (predicate nominative) The girl is cute. (predicate adjective) Intransitive complete are all the verbs that don't fit one of the other kinds of transitive or intransitive verbs. Examples: The bell rang suddenly. The girl knitted all evening. (There is no receiver of the action.) They were here. (no action or predicate nominative or predicate adjective.)

Instructions: Tell whether the verbs in the following sentences are transitive active, transitive passive, intransitive linking, or intransitive complete.

1. Father was always losing his keys.

2. The dinner was hastily prepared.

3. The strange face was seen in the window.

4. The cold man was going down the road.

5. My wife is a beautiful woman.


--For answers scroll down.












Answers:

1. was losing - transitive active

2. was prepared - transitive passive

3. was seen - transitive passive

4. was going - intransitive complete

5. is - intransitive linking

For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html. Our lessons are also available to purchase in an eBook and a Workbook format.

Thursday, February 9, 2017

Lesson 124 - Parts of the Sentence - Transitive and Intransitive Verbs

Transitive verbs are verbs that have subjects or objects that receive the action. They are either active voice or passive voice. Transitive active verbs are the verbs in sentences with a direct object. Example: The boy kicked the ball. The subject is the doer and the direct object is the receiver of the action. Transitive passive verbs have the subject receiving the action with the doer in a prepositional phrase or omitted in the sentence. Examples: The ball was kicked by the boy. The ball was kicked hard. The verb in the transitive passive voice always has is, am, are, was, were, be, being, or been as an auxiliary or helping verb.

Transitive active sentences can be changed to transitive passive sentences by making the direct object the subject and putting the subject either in a prepositional phrase or omitting it. Example: The daughter kissed her mother on the cheek. The mother was kissed on the cheek by her daughter. The mother was kissed on the cheek. (Mother is the receiver of the action in all three sentences, but in the last two sentences mother is the subject of the sentences.)

Instructions: Transform the following transitive passive sentences into transitive active sentences by making the old subject the direct object and adding a new subject.

1. The music was practiced every day.

2. The homecoming parade has been delayed.

3. The entries must be mailed by tomorrow.

4. A solution to the problem had been sought everywhere.

5. The quilt was finally finished.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. She practiced the music everyday.

2. The accident delayed the homecoming parade.

3. You must mail the entries by tomorrow.

4. They sought a solution to the problem everywhere.

5. The women finally finished the quilt.

(Your answers may vary somewhat from mine.)

For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html. Our lessons are also available to purchase in an eBook and a Workbook format.

Wednesday, February 8, 2017

Lesson 123 - Parts of the Sentence - Transitive and Intransitive Verbs

Transitive verbs are verbs that have subjects or objects that receive the action. They are either active voice or passive voice. Transitive active verbs are the verbs in sentences with a direct object. Example: The boy kicked the ball. The subject is the doer and the direct object is the receiver of the action. Transitive passive verbs have the subject receiving the action with the doer in a prepositional phrase or omitted in the sentence. Examples: The ball was kicked by the boy. The ball was kicked hard. The verb in the transitive passive voice always has is, am, are, was, were, be, being, or been as an auxiliary or helping verb.

Transitive active sentences can be changed to transitive passive sentences by making the direct object the subject and putting the subject either in a prepositional phrase or omitting it. Example: The daughter kissed her mother on the cheek. The mother was kissed on the cheek by her daughter. The mother was kissed on the cheek. (Mother is the receiver of the action in all three sentences, but in the last two sentences mother is the subject of the sentences.)

Instructions: Transform the following transitive passive sentences into transitive active sentences by taking the new subject from the prepositional phrase and making the old subject the direct object.

1. Consent was given by Rebecca.

2. The note was written by you.

3. Gunpowder was invented by the Chinese.

4. The prize was won by the last contestant.

5. The difficult role was played well by the understudy.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. Rebecca gave her consent.

2. You wrote the note.

3. The Chinese invented gunpowder.

4. The last contestant won the prize.

5. The understudy played well the difficult role.

(Your answers may vary somewhat from mine.)

For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html. Our lessons are also available to purchase in an eBook and a Workbook format.

Tuesday, February 7, 2017

Lesson 122 - Parts of the Sentence - Transitive and Intransitive Verbs

Transitive verbs are verbs that have subjects or objects that receive the action. They are either active voice or passive voice. Transitive active verbs are the verbs in sentences with a direct object. Example: The boy kicked the ball. The subject is the doer and the direct object is the receiver of the action. Transitive passive verbs have the subject receiving the action with the doer in a prepositional phrase or omitted in the sentence. Examples: The ball was kicked by the boy. The ball was kicked hard. The verb in the transitive passive voice always has is, am, are, was, were, be, being, or been as an auxiliary or helping verb.

Transitive active sentences can be changed to transitive passive sentences by making the direct object the subject and putting the subject either in a prepositional phrase or omitting it. Example: The daughter kissed her mother on the cheek. The mother was kissed on the cheek by her daughter. The mother was kissed on the cheek. (Mother is the receiver of the action in all three sentences, but in the last two sentences mother is the subject of the sentences.)

Instructions: Transform the following transitive active sentences into transitive passive sentences by omitting the subject.

1. She put the ribbon on the package.

2. People chew the twigs for medicinal purposes.

3. The marks easily identified the trees to cut down.

4. The neighbors enjoyed the nightly chats over the fence.

5. The class play received a standing ovation on the first night.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. The ribbon was put on the package.

2. The twigs are chewed for medicinal purposes.

3. The trees to cut down were easily identified.

4. The nightly chats were enjoyed over the fence.

5. A standing ovation was received on the first night.

(Your answers may vary somewhat from mine.)

For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html. Our lessons are also available to purchase in an eBook and a Workbook format.

Monday, February 6, 2017

Lesson 121 - Parts of the Sentence - Transitive and Intransitive Verbs

Transitive verbs are verbs that have subjects or objects that receive the action. They are either active voice or passive voice. Transitive active verbs are the verbs in sentences with a direct object. Example: The boy kicked the ball. The subject is the doer and the direct object is the receiver of the action. Transitive passive verbs have the subject receiving the action with the doer in a prepositional phrase or omitted in the sentence. Examples: The ball was kicked by the boy. The ball was kicked hard. The verb in the transitive passive voice always has is, am, are, was, were, be, being, or been as an auxiliary or helping verb.

Transitive active sentences can be changed to transitive passive sentences by making the direct object the subject and putting the subject either in a prepositional phrase or omitting it. Example: The daughter kissed her mother on the cheek. The mother was kissed on the cheek by her daughter. The mother was kissed on the cheek. (Mother is the receiver of the action in all three sentences, but in the last two sentences mother is the subject of the sentences.)

Instructions: Transform the following transitive active sentences into transitive passive sentences by putting the subject in a prepositional phrase.

1. The whole state elects the governor.

2. Children from all countries love that game.

3. The critics reviewed the new Broadway play.

4. The pirates hid the treasure quickly.

5. Terri examined the bugs on the tree.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. The governor is elected by the whole state.

2. That game is loved by children of all countries.

3. The new Broadway play was reviewed by the critics.

4. The treasure was quickly hidden by the pirates.

5. The bugs on the tree were examined by Terri.

(Your answers may vary somewhat from mine.)

For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html. Our lessons are also available to purchase in an eBook and a Workbook format.

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