Saturday, November 26, 2016

Quiz for Lessons 66-70 - Parts of Speech - Adverbs

Instructions: Choose the correct form for the following sentences.

1. Matthew plays tennis (bad, badly).

2. Can't you see the game (good, well)?

3. The apple tastes (bad, badly).

4. Are you (sure, surely) he will come?

5. The man felt (bad, badly) about the accident.

6. The weather has been (real, really) cold lately.

7. His death caused everyone to be (real, very) sad.

8. Do you feel (good, well)?

9. The pizza tastes (real, really) (good, well).

10. You (sure, surely) are wrong.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. badly

2. well

3. bad

4. sure

5. bad

6. really

7. very

8. well

9. really, good

10. surely

For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html. Our lessons are also available to purchase in an eBook and a Workbook format.

Friday, November 25, 2016

Lesson 70 - Parts of Speech - Adverbs

Instructions: Choose the correct form for each of these sentences. Remember that adjectives modify nouns and pronouns while adverbs modify verbs, adjectives or other adverbs.

1. Mr. Peterson always speaks (good, well).

2. That coach (sure, surely) gets results.

3. Those knives are (awful, very) sharp.

4. The bacon tasted (good, well).

5. The new teacher (sure, really) is smart.

6. Your assignment was done (bad, badly).

7. I am (real, really) sorry to hear that.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. well

2. surely

3. very

4. good

5. really

6. badly

7. really

For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html. Our lessons are also available to purchase in an eBook and a Workbook format.

Thursday, November 24, 2016

Lesson 69 - Parts of Speech - Adverbs

The adjectives real and awful should not be used for the adverbs really, very, and extremely.

Instructions: Choose the correct form for each of these sentences.

1. She is (very, real) sorry.

2. Today is (really, real) stormy.

3. Is that a (really, real) person?

4. Be sure to drive (very, real) carefully on slick roads.

5. I am (extremely, real) tired of your antics.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. very

2. really

3. real

4. very

5. extremely

For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html. Our lessons are also available to purchase in an eBook and a Workbook format.

Wednesday, November 23, 2016

Lesson 68 - Parts of Speech - Adverbs

The adverb badly is used to tell how something is done. The adjective bad is used to refer to health or feelings and to complete linking verbs such as seem, look, taste, smell.

Instructions: Choose the correct form for each of the following sentences.

1. Our football team played (bad, badly) last night.

2. John felt (bad, badly) about the loss.

3. The medicine doesn't taste too (bad, badly).

4. Our science project went (bad, badly).

5. The air in the sewer smelled (bad, badly).


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. badly

2. bad

3. bad

4. badly

5. bad

For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html. Our lessons are also available to purchase in an eBook and a Workbook format.

Tuesday, November 22, 2016

Lesson 67 - Parts of Speech - Adverbs

The adjective good should not be used for the adverb well. Well should be used for an adjective only when it refers to health or appearance.

Instructions: Choose the correct form for each of these sentences.

1. This food tastes very (good, well).

2. Ann doesn't drive very (good, well).

3. Dad writes (good, well).

4. Becky worked (good, well) today.

5. That hot sun feels (good, well).


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. good

2. well

3. well

4. well

5. good

For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html. Our lessons are also available to purchase in an eBook and a Workbook format.

Monday, November 21, 2016

Lesson 66 - Parts of Speech - Adverbs

People often confuse the use of some adverbs and adjectives. The next few lessons will cover some common mistakes. Remember that adjectives modify nouns or pronouns. Adverbs modify verbs, adjectives, or other adverbs.

This lesson will be about the use of the adjective sure and the adverbs surely, certainly, and really. Use sure only when one of these three adverbs does not make sense.

Examples: Jim is sure he is right. Surely he is right.

Instructions: Choose the correct form for each of these sentences.

1. You seem very (surely, sure) of yourself.

2. Ila (surely, sure) is tired from work.

3. The milk (surely, sure) tastes sour.

4. Are you (surely, sure) this is the right road?

5. This story (surely, sure) is exciting.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. sure

2. surely

3. surely

4. sure

5. surely

(Each answer in which you used surely could be substituted with the other adverbs really and certainly and still make sense.)

For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html. Our lessons are also available to purchase in an eBook and a Workbook format.

Amazon Contextual Product Ads