Saturday, February 13, 2016

Quiz for Lessons 361 - 365 - Mechanics - Punctuation - Commas

Instructions: Place commas where they are needed.

1. Within the business was in turmoil.

2. Matthew is going to law school; John to the Air Force.

3. To Jim Ryan is a hero.

4. I like Halloween; Mother Thanksgiving; Barbara Christmas.

5. The antique which avoided being broken for many years was given to my grandmother by George Washington.

6. An apple not an orange keeps the doctor away.

7. We are still going on the hike aren't we?

8. The letter sent through the mail changed the course of the war.

9. You really like her don't you!

10. A person's personality not his looks really is important in a husband.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. Within, the business was in turmoil.

2. Matthew is going to law school; John, to the Air Force.

3. To Jim, Ryan is a hero.

4. I like Halloween; Mother, Thanksgiving; Barbara, Christmas.

5. The antique, which avoided being broken for many years, was given to my grandmother by George Washington.

6. An apple, not an orange, keeps the doctor away.

7. We are still going on the hike, aren't we?

8. The letter, sent through the mail, changed the course of the war.

9. You really like her, don't you!

10. A person's personality, not his looks, really is important in a husband.

For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html. Our lessons are also available to purchase in an eBook, a FlipBook, and a Workbook format.

Friday, February 12, 2016

Lesson 365 - Mechanics - Punctuation - Commas

Use a comma wherever necessary for clarity to prevent misreading. Example: Beneath, the water sparkled brilliantly. (clear) Beneath the water sparkled brilliantly. (Confusing)

Instructions: Place commas where they are needed.

1. To write one must spend much time revising and proofreading.

2. After washing the boy left for the game.

3. Although a real diamond mine is rather small.

4. Inside the store contained many beautiful statues.

5. When eating a person should use good manners.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. To write, one must spend much time revising and proofreading.

2. After washing, the boy left for the game.

3. Although a real diamond, mine is rather small.

4. Inside, the store contained many beautiful statues.

5. When eating, a person should use good manners.

For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html. Our lessons are also available to purchase in an eBook, a FlipBook, and a Workbook format.

Thursday, February 11, 2016

Lesson 364 - Mechanics - Punctuation - Commas

Use commas to set off nonrestrictive clauses and phrases. Nonrestrictive clauses and phrases are modifiers that can be omitted without changing the meaning of the main clause. Example: Our new boat, which we bought last week, is a pleasure to use. (The adjective clause "which we bought last week" is not needed to understand the meaning of the main clause.)

Instructions: Place commas where they are needed.

1. The Jazz which is a much different team from last year start the season next week.

2. The waiter balancing two trays of food saw our signal for the check.

3. Ads which are essential to our economy are very annoying much of the time.

4. For this job we need a person who is very creative.

5. The new baby delivered in the taxi changed our lives completely.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. The Jazz, which is a much different team from last year, start the season next week.

2. The waiter, balancing two trays of food, saw our signal for the check.

3. Ads, which are essential to our economy, are very annoying much of the time.

4. For this job we need a person who is very creative. (The clause "who is very creative" is needed for the meaning of the main sentence so we would not use any comma.)

5. The new baby, delivered in the taxi, changed our lives completely.

For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html. Our lessons are also available to purchase in an eBook, a FlipBook, and a Workbook format.

Wednesday, February 10, 2016

Lesson 363 - Mechanics - Punctuation - Commas

Use commas to set off contrasted expressions. Example: His mother, not his father, is in charge.

Instructions: Place commas where they are needed.

1. Your car not your truck is the better vehicle to use.

2. My aunt not my uncle used to live here before.

3. You need to talk to the man at the end of the table not the one near the window.

4. Our track team not our baseball team won the championship.

5. Be sure to see the owner not the manager about the job.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. Your car, not your truck, is the better vehicle to use.

2. My aunt, not my uncle, used to live here before.

3. You need to talk to the man at the end of the table, not the one near the window.

4. Our track team, not our baseball team, won the championship.

5. Be sure to see the owner, not the manager, about the job.

For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html. Our lessons are also available to purchase in an eBook, a FlipBook, and a Workbook format.

Tuesday, February 9, 2016

Lesson 362 - Mechanics - Punctuation - Commas

Use a comma when words are omitted from parallel clauses in a compound sentence. Example: Mother baked an apple pie, and Aunt Gayle, a chocolate cake.

Instructions: Place commas where they are needed.

1. Fred asked the question; Sarah the answer.

2. I like classical music; my wife country music.

3. Ann graduated from Utah State University, and Boyd Arizona State University.

4. This box has the books, and that box the recordings.

5. Stephanie told a funny story; Alaina a scary one.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. Fred asked the question; Sarah, the answer.

2. I like classical music; my wife, country music.

3. Ann graduated from Utah State University, and Boyd, Arizona State University.

4. This box has the books, and that box, the recordings.

5. Stephanie told a funny story; Alaina, a scary one.

For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html. Our lessons are also available to purchase in an eBook, a FlipBook, and a Workbook format.

Monday, February 8, 2016

Lesson 361 - Mechanics - Punctuation - Commas

Use a comma to set off a short clause at the end of the sentence to change a statement into a question or an exclamatory sentence. Example: You are going to town, aren't you?

Instructions: Place commas where they are needed.

1. That should make them take notice shouldn't it!

2. This is a beautiful location isn't it?

3. Becky is a living miracle isn't she!

4. Joe was here this morning wasn't he?

5. The new player really tries doesn't he!


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. That should make them take notice, shouldn't it!

2. This is a beautiful location, isn't it?

3. Becky is a living miracle, isn't she!

4. Joe was here this morning, wasn't he?

5. The new player really tries, doesn't he!

For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html. Our lessons are also available to purchase in an eBook, a FlipBook, and a Workbook format.

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