Saturday, January 30, 2016

Quiz for Lessons 351 - 355 - Mechanics - Punctuation - Commas

Instructions: Place commas where they are needed.

1. Ila indeed is a good mother.

2. I hope Jennie that you don't go to jail.

3. My son-in-law Chris will be able to vote in the coming election.

4. Oh Gail I hope that you on the other hand will be happy with your decision your move to Europe.

5. We sat in the shade beneath a broad green tree Irene.

6. It was a lovely happy memorable time.

7. I know after all you will be successful.

8. Mr. Allen Rudy the boy next door has been fighting with your brother Richard.

9. Of course we could hear immediately that you after all will be going to Santos a great city in Brazil.

10. Well Will I hope to see you by the way in Manaus on our return from our vacation a trip to Australia.


--For answers scroll down.












Answers:

1. Ila, indeed, is a good mother.

2. I hope, Jennie, that you don't go to jail.

3. My son-in-law Chris will be able to vote in the coming election. (a closely related appositive or use commas around Chris if you thought it was a noun of address) My son-in-law, Chris, will be able to vote in the coming election.

4. Oh, Gail, I hope that you, on the other hand, will be happy with your decision, your move to Europe.

5. We sat in the shade beneath a broad green tree, Irene.

6. It was a lovely, happy, memorable time.

7. I know, after all, you will be successful.

8. Mr. Allen, Rudy, the boy next door, has been fighting with your brother Richard. (Richard is a closely related appositive)

9. Of course, we could hear immediately that you, after all, will be going to Santos, a great city in Brazil.

10. Well, Will, I hope to see you, by the way, in Manaus on our return from our vacation, a trip to Australia.

For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html. Our lessons are also available to purchase in an eBook, a FlipBook, and a Workbook format.

Friday, January 29, 2016

Lesson 355 - Mechanics - Punctuation - Commas

Use commas to set off parenthetical expressions. Parenthetical expressions are words inserted in the main sentence but not necessary to the meaning. They interrupt the flow of the sentence. Common expressions used parenthetically are however, of course, on the other hand, in fact, for example, that is, by the way, after all, perhaps, indeed, also, too, nevertheless. These expressions are not always parenthetical. Examples: Lucy, on the other hand, reads little. He knows, perhaps, five answers to the questions.

Instructions: Place commas where they are needed.

1. The story that I just told you by the way is true.

2. My plan nevertheless was followed and succeeded.

3. Your plan on the other hand was rejected for good reasons.

4. I might suggest for example that you make some revisions.

5. You in fact should be moved to a different department.


--For answers scroll down.












Answers:

1. The story that I just told you, by the way, is true.

2. My plan, nevertheless, was followed and succeeded.

3. Your plan, on the other hand, was rejected for good reasons.

4. I might suggest, for example, that you make some revisions.

5. You, in fact, should be moved to a different department.

For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html. Our lessons are also available to purchase in an eBook, a FlipBook, and a Workbook format.

Thursday, January 28, 2016

Lesson 354 - Mechanics - Punctuation - Commas

Use a comma to separate co-ordinate adjectives. Co-ordinate adjectives can be checked to see if a comma is necessary by placing and between them. They will sound smooth and correct with the and.

Examples: The warm, sunny day made everyone happy. (warm and sunny sounds smooth) You are a clever little girl. (clever and little doesn't sound smooth)

Instructions: Place commas where they are needed.

1. Today was not a clear sunny day.

2. Allison thought she was such a clever little girl.

3. Where did you buy that dashing red car?

4. They say that tomorrow will be a sunny warm day.

5. Your careless inconsiderate behavior could cause you serious problems.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. Today was not a clear, sunny day.

2. no commas needed

3. no commas needed

4. They say that tomorrow will be a sunny, warm day.

5. Your careless, inconsiderate behavior could cause you serious problems.

For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html. Our lessons are also available to purchase in an eBook, a FlipBook, and a Workbook format.

Wednesday, January 27, 2016

Lesson 353 - Mechanics - Punctuation - Commas

Use a comma or commas to set off an appositive if not closely tied to the words it equals or identifies. Examples: Larry Millward, my best friend, will speak at the meeting. My brother Ken moved to Hawaii. (closely tied)

Instructions: Place commas where they are needed.

1. Fred James a soldier captured during World War II spoke at the assembly.

2. My sister Elaine died recently.

3. Paul the top student in his class was the valedictorian.

4. Small farming a very important occupation is disappearing.

5. We rode all day on Dot a very old and gentle horse.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. Fred James, a soldier captured during World War II, spoke at the assembly.

2. My sister Elaine died recently. (It is closely tied, but one could take Elaine as a noun of address if you don't know her as the sister.)

3. Paul, the top student in his class, was the valedictorian.

4. Small farming, a very important occupation, is disappearing.

5. We rode all day on Dot, a very old and gentle horse.

For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html. Our lessons are also available to purchase in an eBook, a FlipBook, and a Workbook format.

Tuesday, January 26, 2016

Lesson 352 - Mechanics - Punctuation - Commas

Use a comma or commas to set off words or phrases used as nouns of address (nominatives of address).

Joe, get over here. Get over here, Joe. Young man, get over here.

Instructions: Place commas where they are needed.

1. Did you Susan see him at the meetings?

2. I will call you in the morning Steve.

3. Well Fred it was a pleasure to see you again.

4. Jeanne I don't know what is going on.

5. You should Bill know the answer to that one.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. Did you, Susan, see him at the meetings?

2. I will call you in the morning, Steve.

3. Well, Fred, it was a pleasure to see you again.

4. Jeanne, I don't know what is going on.

5. You should, Bill, know the answer to that one.

For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html. Our lessons are also available to purchase in an eBook, a FlipBook, and a Workbook format.

Monday, January 25, 2016

Lesson 351 - Mechanics - Punctuation - Commas

Use a comma to separate introductory words yes and no and mild interjections from the sentence that follows them.

Examples: Oh, I heard that before. Yes, I will be here.

Instructions: Place commas where they are needed.

1. Yes you may leave the room.

2. Of course I won't change my plans.

3. Oh you want to try my patience more.

4. No I didn't see you there.

5. Wow you think that is great.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. Yes,

2. Of course,

3. Oh,

4. No,

5. Wow,

For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html. Our lessons are also available to purchase in an eBook, a FlipBook, and a Workbook format.

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