Saturday, September 26, 2015

Quiz for Lessons 261 - 265 - Parts of the Sentence - Adverb Clauses

Instructions: Find the adverb clauses in the following sentences and tell what they modify.

1. I am hungrier than I thought.

2. We left before the game was over.

3. Lee is older than Bill.

4. While I was waiting for the phone call, I read a book.

5. If you don't believe me, ask my wife.

6. Are you upset because I didn't call?

7. The alarm rang while I was in the shower.

8. Open the window so that we can have some fresh air.

9. Paul will take you home when you are ready.

10. You shouldn't say those things unless you are certain about their validity.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. than I thought modifies the predicate adjective hungrier

2. before the game was over modifies the verb left

3. than Bill (is old) modifies the predicate adjective older

4. While I was waiting for the phone call modifies the verb read

5. If you don't believe me modifies the verb ask

6. because I didn't call modifies the predicate adjective upset

7. while I was in the shower modifies the verb rang

8. so that we can have some fresh air modifies the verb open

9. when you are ready modifies the verb will take

10. unless you are certain about their validity modifies the verb should say

For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html. Our lessons are also available to purchase in an eBook, a FlipBook, and a Workbook format.

Friday, September 25, 2015

Lesson 265 - Parts of the Sentence - Adverb Clauses

A complex sentence is made up of an independent clause and a dependent clause. Example: The television was playing (independent clause which can stand alone and make sense) as I left the room (dependent clause which must be attached to the independent clause to make sense). There are three kinds of dependent clauses: adjective clause, adverb clause and noun clause.

An adverb clause is a dependent clause that modifies a verb, adjective, or another adverb. It usually modifies the verb.

Adverb clauses are introduced by subordinate conjunctions including after, although, as, as if, before, because, if, since, so that, than, though, unless, until, when, where, and while. These are just some of the more common ones.

Example: They arrived before the game had ended. ("before the game had ended" is the adverb clause modifying the verb arrived telling when.)

Sometimes the adverb clause is placed at the beginning of the sentence. When it introduces the sentence, it is always set off with a comma. Example: Before the game had ended, they arrived.

Than and as introduce clauses that are called elliptical clauses. That is they have some of their parts understood but not stated. Example: You are smarter than I. (am smart.) They always modify the comparative word (smarter).

Instructions: Find the adverb clauses in the following sentences and tell what they modify.

1. Ila reads music better than Becky.

2. The dog whined sadly as I walked into the house.

3. If you have time, finish doing the dishes for me.

4. Many operations are unsuccessful because the patient is not careful afterwards.

5. Whenever I go out the door, the dog barks to go also.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. than Becky (can read music well) modifies the adverb better

2. as I walked into the house modifies the verb whined

3. If you have time modifies the verb finish

4. because the patient in not careful afterwards modifies the predicate adjective unsuccessful

5. Whenever I go out the door modifies the verb barks

For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html. Our lessons are also available to purchase in an eBook, a FlipBook, and a Workbook format.

Thursday, September 24, 2015

Lesson 264 - Parts of the Sentence - Adverb Clauses

A complex sentence is made up of an independent clause and a dependent clause. Example: The television was playing (independent clause which can stand alone and make sense) as I left the room (dependent clause which must be attached to the independent clause to make sense). There are three kinds of dependent clauses: adjective clause, adverb clause and noun clause.

An adverb clause is a dependent clause that modifies a verb, adjective, or another adverb. It usually modifies the verb.

Adverb clauses are introduced by subordinate conjunctions including after, although, as, as if, before, because, if, since, so that, than, though, unless, until, when, where, and while. These are just some of the more common ones.

Example: They arrived before the game had ended. ("before the game had ended" is the adverb clause modifying the verb arrived telling when.)

Sometimes the adverb clause is placed at the beginning of the sentence. When it introduces the sentence, it is always set off with a comma. Example: Before the game had ended, they arrived.

Than and as introduce clauses that are called elliptical clauses. That is they have some of their parts understood but not stated. Example: You are smarter than I. (am smart.) They always modify the comparative word (smarter).

Instructions: Find the adverb clauses in the following sentences and tell what they modify.

1. Although I became tired, I enjoyed the hike.

2. You cannot become an expert driver until you drive for several years.

3. Buy that coat now because it might be sold tomorrow.

4. I cannot reach the top window unless I have a ladder.

5. After you have eaten lunch, we will leave for New York.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. Although I became tired modifies the verb enjoyed

2. until you drive for several years modifies the verb can become

3. because it might be sold tomorrow modifies the verb buy

4. unless I have a ladder modifies the verb can reach

5. After you have eaten lunch modifies the verb will leave

For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html. Our lessons are also available to purchase in an eBook, a FlipBook, and a Workbook format.

Wednesday, September 23, 2015

Lesson 263 - Parts of the Sentence - Adverb Clauses

A complex sentence is made up of an independent clause and a dependent clause. Example: The television was playing (independent clause which can stand alone and make sense) as I left the room (dependent clause which must be attached to the independent clause to make sense). There are three kinds of dependent clauses: adjective clause, adverb clause and noun clause.

An adverb clause is a dependent clause that modifies a verb, adjective, or another adverb. It usually modifies the verb.

Adverb clauses are introduced by subordinate conjunctions including after, although, as, as if, before, because, if, since, so that, than, though, unless, until, when, where, and while. These are just some of the more common ones.

Example: They arrived before the game had ended. ("before the game had ended" is the adverb clause modifying the verb arrived telling when.)

Sometimes the adverb clause is placed at the beginning of the sentence. When it introduces the sentence, it is always set off with a comma. Example: Before the game had ended, they arrived.

Than and as introduce clauses that are called elliptical clauses. That is they have some of their parts understood but not stated. Example: You are smarter than I. (am smart.) They always modify the comparative word (smarter).

Instructions: Complete the elliptical adverb clauses in the following sentences and tell what they modify.

1. My dog is older than I.

2. Jim can run faster than Jeff.

3. Pam spells more accurately than she keyboards.

4. He is trying as hard as James.

5. Barbara is a better tennis player than Jeanne.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. My dog is older than I am old. than I am old modifies the predicate adjective older

2. Jim can run faster than Jeff can run fast. than Jeff can run fast modifies the adverb faster

3. Pam spells more accurately than she keyboards accurately. than she keyboards accurately modifies the adverb accurately

4. He is trying as hard as James is trying hard. as James is trying hard modifies the adverb hard

5. Barbara is a better tennis player than Jeanne is a good tennis player. than Jeanne is a good tennis player modifies the adjective better

For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html. Our lessons are also available to purchase in an eBook, a FlipBook, and a Workbook format.

Tuesday, September 22, 2015

Lesson 262 - Parts of the Sentence - Adverb Clauses

A complex sentence is made up of an independent clause and a dependent clause. Example: The television was playing (independent clause which can stand alone and make sense) as I left the room (dependent clause which must be attached to the independent clause to make sense). There are three kinds of dependent clauses: adjective clause, adverb clause and noun clause.

An adverb clause is a dependent clause that modifies a verb, adjective, or another adverb. It usually modifies the verb.

Adverb clauses are introduced by subordinate conjunctions including after, although, as, as if, before, because, if, since, so that, than, though, unless, until, when, where, and while. These are just some of the more common ones.

Example: They arrived before the game had ended. ("before the game had ended" is the adverb clause modifying the verb arrived telling when.)

Sometimes the adverb clause is placed at the beginning of the sentence. When it introduces the sentence, it is always set off with a comma. Example: Before the game had ended, they arrived.

Instructions: Find the adverb clauses in the following sentences and tell what they modify.

1. When you came from the garage, did you see the mower there?

2. Because the field was muddy, the game had to be cancelled.

3. Although you should return to class, just wait here for me.

4. As I sat motionless, the two squirrels came closer and closer.

5. Since I can spare only a few minutes, please be brief with your presentation.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. When you came from the garage modifies the verb did see

2. Because the field was muddy modifies the verbal to be cancelled

3. Although you should return to class modifies the verb wait

4. As I sat motionless modifies the verb came

5. Since I can spare only a few minutes modifies the predicate adjective brief

For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html. Our lessons are also available to purchase in an eBook, a FlipBook, and a Workbook format.

Monday, September 21, 2015

Lesson 261 - Parts of the Sentence - Adverb Clauses

A complex sentence is made up of an independent clause and a dependent clause. Example: The television was playing (independent clause which can stand alone and make sense) as I left the room (dependent clause which must be attached to the independent clause to make sense). There are three kinds of dependent clauses: adjective clause, adverb clause and noun clause.

An adverb clause is a dependent clause that modifies a verb, adjective, or another adverb. It usually modifies the verb.

Adverb clauses are introduced by subordinate conjunctions including after, although, as, as if, before, because, if, since, so that, than, though, unless, until, when, where, and while. These are just some of the more common ones.

Example: They arrived before the game had ended. ("before the game had ended" is the adverb clause modifying the verb arrived telling when.)

Instructions: Find the adverb clauses in the following sentences and tell what they modify.

1. You clean the bathroom while I clean the carpet.

2. Ann was confident that she would play the best.

3. Bring in the toys before they get destroyed.

4. I stood on the box so that I could see the top of the shelf.

5. Your face becomes red when you are angry.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. while I clean the carpet modifies the verb clean

2. that she would play the best modifies the predicate adjective confident

3. before they get destroyed modifies the verb bring

4. so that I could see the top of the shelf modifies the verb stood

5. when you are angry modifies the verb becomes

For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html. Our lessons are also available to purchase in an eBook, a FlipBook, and a Workbook format.

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