Saturday, January 9, 2021

Quiz for Lessons 101 - 105 - Parts of the Sentence - Predicate Nominative

View quiz on Daily Grammar

Instructions: Find the subjects, verbs, and predicate nominatives in these sentences. Some may have compound subjects, verbs, or predicate nominatives. Some may not have a predicate nominative.

1. My favorite musical instruments are the radio, television, and stereo.

2. Two popular trees are the linden and the honey locust.

3. The winner will be either Jeff or Will.

4. Are those people our neighbors and friends?

5. Baseball and golf are outdoor sports.

6. I will be home tomorrow.

7. Your doctor should be a well-trained individual.

8. Jenny and Emily are close friends.

9. The grand prize was a trip to Hawaii and a cruise to Alaska.

10. Mr. Hatch is a member of congress and a song writer.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. My favorite musical instruments are the radio, television, and stereo.

2. Two popular trees are the linden and the honey locust.

3. The winner will be either Jeff or Will.

4. Are those people our neighbors and friends?

5. Baseball and golf are outdoor sports.
 
6. I will be home tomorrow.

7. Your doctor should be a well-trained individual.

8. Jenny and Emily are close friends.

9. The grand prize was a trip to Hawaii and a cruise to Alaska.

10. Mr. Hatch is a member of congress and a song writer.
 


For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html.

Friday, January 8, 2021

Lesson 105 - Parts of the Sentence - Predicate Nominative

View lesson on Daily Grammar

A predicate nominative or predicate noun completes a linking verb and renames the subject.  It is a complement or completer because it completes the verb.  The verb in a sentence having a predicate nominative can always be replaced by the word equals.

     Examples:
     Mr. Johanson is a teacher.
     Mr. Johanson equals a teacher.
     Mr. Johanson is a father.
     Mr. Johanson equals a father.
     Mr. Johanson is my neighbor.
     Mr. Johanson equals my neighbor.

Predicate nominatives complete only linking verbs. The linking verbs include the following: the helping verbs is, am, are, was, were, be, being, and been; the sense verbs look, taste, smell, feel, and sound; and verbs like become, seem, appear, grow, continue, stay, and turn.

Predicate nominatives can be compound. 
 
     Example: 
     Mr. Johanson is a teacher, father, and my neighbor.

Instructions: List the subject, verb, and predicate nominatives in the following sentences. Some may have compound subjects, verbs, or predicate nominatives. Some may not have a predicate nominative.

1. An honest man should have been the leader of the country.

2. Curt's favorite toy is his big truck.

3. Students' favorite food must be pizza.

4. The alarm must be ringing again and again.

5. My homes have been a school house, an old apartment, and a moved-in house.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. An honest man should have been the leader of the country.

2. Curt's favorite toy is his big truck.

3. Students' favorite food must be pizza.

4. The alarm must be ringing again and again.

5. My homes have been a school house, an old apartment, and a moved-in house.
 


For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html.

Thursday, January 7, 2021

Lesson 104 - Parts of the Sentence - Predicate Nominative

View lesson on Daily Grammar

A predicate nominative or predicate noun completes a linking verb and renames the subject.  It is a complement or completer because it completes the verb.  The verb in a sentence having a predicate nominative can always be replaced by the word equals.

     Examples:
     Mr. Johanson is a teacher.
     Mr. Johanson equals a teacher.
     Mr. Johanson is a father.
     Mr. Johanson equals a father.
     Mr. Johanson is my neighbor.
     Mr. Johanson equals my neighbor.

Predicate nominatives complete only linking verbs. The linking verbs include the following: the helping verbs is, am, are, was, were, be, being, and been; the sense verbs look, taste, smell, feel, and sound; and verbs like become, seem, appear, grow, continue, stay, and turn.

Predicate nominatives can be compound. 
 
     Example: 
     Mr. Johanson is a teacher, father, and my neighbor.

Instructions: List the subject, verb, and predicate nominatives in the following sentences. Some may have compound subjects, verbs, or predicate nominatives. Some may not have a predicate nominative.

1. Abbott and Costello were famous actors and a comedy team.

2. Radio and television have become old inventions and household necessities.

3. Many neglected children become really unhappy grownups.

4. The car has been here for a long time.

5. She was a model and became a movie star.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. Abbott and Costello were famous actors and a comedy team.

2. Radio and television have become old inventions and household necessities.

3. Many neglected children become really unhappy grownups.

4. The car has been here for a long time.

5. She was a model and became a movie star.
 

For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html.

Wednesday, January 6, 2021

Lesson 103 - Parts of the Sentence - Predicate Nominative

View lesson on Daily Grammar

A predicate nominative or predicate noun completes a linking verb and renames the subject.  It is a complement or completer because it completes the verb.  The verb in a sentence having a predicate nominative can always be replaced by the word equals.

     Examples:
     Mr. Johanson is a teacher.
     Mr. Johanson equals a teacher.
     Mr. Johanson is a father.
     Mr. Johanson equals a father.
     Mr. Johanson is my neighbor.
     Mr. Johanson equals my neighbor.

Predicate nominatives complete only linking verbs. The linking verbs include the following: the helping verbs is, am, are, was, were, be, being, and been; the sense verbs look, taste, smell, feel, and sound; and verbs like become, seem, appear, grow, continue, stay, and turn.

Predicate nominatives can be compound. 
 
     Example: 
     Mr. Johanson is a teacher, father, and my neighbor.

Instructions: List the subject, verb, and predicate nominatives in the following sentences. Some may have compound subjects, verbs, or predicate nominatives.

1. One traitor and enemy to his country was Benedict Arnold.

2. Two loved Presidents were Lincoln and Washington.

3. A ruby is a beautiful stone.

4. The roads in the mountains can be long dusty trails.

5. The location to the mine was and still is a secret.


--For answers scroll down.












Answers:

1. One traitor and enemy to his country was Benedict Arnold.

2. Two loved Presidents were Lincoln and Washington.

3. A ruby is a beautiful stone.

4. The roads in the mountains can be long dusty trails.

5. The location to the mine was and still is a secret.
 

For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html.

Tuesday, January 5, 2021

Lesson 102 - Parts of the Sentence - Predicate Nominative

View lesson on Daily Grammar

A predicate nominative or predicate noun completes a linking verb and renames the subject.  It is a complement or completer because it completes the verb.  The verb in a sentence having a predicate nominative can always be replaced by the word equals.

     Examples:
     Mr. Johanson is a teacher.
     Mr. Johanson equals a teacher.
     Mr. Johanson is a father.
     Mr. Johanson equals a father.
     Mr. Johanson is my neighbor.
     Mr. Johanson equals my neighbor.

Predicate nominatives complete only linking verbs. The linking verbs include the following: the helping verbs is, am, are, was, were, be, being, and been; the sense verbs look, taste, smell, feel, and sound; and verbs like become, seem, appear, grow, continue, stay, and turn.

Predicate nominatives can be compound. 
 
     Example: 
     Mr. Johanson is a teacher, father, and my neighbor.

Instructions: List the subject, verb, and predicate nominatives in the following sentences.

1. My favorite pets were a squirrel and a rabbit.

2. Our chief crops are corn, wheat, and hay.

3. Mr. Jones is an accountant and a big game hunter.

4. The owners of the race car include Bill, Pete, and Sam.

5. My favorite holidays are Christmas and Easter.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. My favorite pets were a squirrel and a rabbit.

2. Our chief crops are corn, wheat, and hay.

3. Mr. Jones is an accountant and a big game hunter.

4. The owners of the race car include Bill, Pete, and Sam.

5. My favorite holidays are Christmas and Easter.


For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html.

Monday, January 4, 2021

Lesson 101 - Parts of the Sentence - Predicate Nominative

View lesson on Daily Grammar

A predicate nominative or predicate noun completes a linking verb and renames the subject.  It is a complement or completer because it completes the verb.  The verb in a sentence having a predicate nominative can always be replaced by the word equals.

     Examples:
     Mr. Johanson is a teacher.
     Mr. Johanson equals a teacher.
     Mr. Johanson is a father.
     Mr. Johanson equals a father.
     Mr. Johanson is my neighbor.
     Mr. Johanson equals my neighbor.

Predicate nominatives complete only linking verbs. The linking verbs include the following: the helping verbs is, am, are, was, were, be, being, and been; the sense verbs look, taste, smell, feel, and sound; and verbs like become, seem, appear, grow, continue, stay, and turn. 

Instructions: Find the verb, subject, and predicate nominatives in these sentences.

1. Ann is a new mother.

2. The black dog in the yard was a large Doberman.

3. The tall boy has been our best basketball player.

4. My uncle became a rich computer expert.

5. Mr. Bush may be our next President.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. Ann is a new mother.

2. The black dog in the yard was a large Doberman.

3. The tall boy has been our best basketball player.

4. My uncle became a rich computer expert.

5. Mr. Bush may be our next President.
 

For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html.