Saturday, December 26, 2020

Quiz for Lessons 91 - 95 - Parts of the Sentence - Subject/Verb

View lesson on Daily Grammar

Instructions: Find the subject and verb in the following sentences. Remember that some sentences can have an inverted order.

1. Here is my shoe!

2. The little boy hit the big girl.

3. You seem unhappy today.

4. Down the road hopped the rabbit.

5. Are we going out on Halloween?

6. Have the men come all the way from Europe?

7. The soup tasted good in the cold weather.

8. The passenger should have been stopped at the gate.

9. The mail could have arrived earlier.

10. Don't go into that house!


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. Here is my shoe!

2. The little boy hit the big girl.

3. You seem unhappy today.

4. Down the road hopped the rabbit.

5. Are we going out on Halloween?

6. Have the men come all the way from Europe?

7. The soup tasted good in the cold weather.

8. The passenger should have been stopped at the gate.

9. The mail could have arrived earlier.

10. Don't go into that house! (understood you)
 

For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html.

Friday, December 25, 2020

Lesson 95 - Parts of the Sentence - Subject/Verb

View lesson on Daily Grammar

A simple sentence is a group of words expressing a complete thought, and it must have a subject and a verb (predicate - some grammar books use the word predicate, but I will use verb).  A verb shows action or state of being.  The subject tells who or what about the verb.  When finding the subject and the verb in a sentence, always find the verb first and then say who or what followed by the verb.

     Example:
     The bell rang.
     Find the verb - rang
     Who or what rang?
     The bell rang, so bell is the subject.
     The bell rang.

Sometimes a sentence is in inverted order so the subject may come in the middle or at the end of the sentence.

     Example:
     Out of the woods came a bear.
     Find the verb - came
     Who or what came?
     The bear came, so bear is the subject.
     Out of the woods came a bear.

     Example:
     With it, were her cubs in a rolling pile.
     Find the verb - were
     Who or what were?
     The cubs were, so cubs is the subject.
     With it, were her cubs in a rolling pile.

Instructions: Find the subject and verb in these sentences.

1. Just around the corner was the parade.

2. In the fall the leaves cover the ground

3. In the city lived many poor people.

4. Over the fireplace were hanging the stockings for Santa.

5. From the thicket appeared the deer.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. Just around the corner was the parade.

2. In the fall the leaves cover the ground

3. In the city lived many poor people.

4. Over the fireplace were hanging the stockings for Santa.

5. From the thicket appeared the deer.
 

For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html.

Thursday, December 24, 2020

Lesson 94 - Parts of the Sentence - Subject/Verb

View lesson on Daily Grammar

A simple sentence is a group of words expressing a complete thought, and it must have a subject and a verb (predicate - some grammar books use the word predicate, but I will use verb).  A verb shows action or state of being.  The subject tells who or what about the verb.  When finding the subject and the verb in a sentence, always find the verb first and then say who or what followed by the verb.

     Example:
     The bell rang.
     Find the verb - rang
     Who or what rang?
     The bell rang, so bell is the subject.
     The bell rang.

An interrogative sentence asks a question.

     Example:
     Do you know the man?

Interrogative sentences many times have the subject between the parts of the verb phrase. To find the verb and the subject, turn the question into a statement.

     Example:
     Have you seen my coat?
     You have seen my coat.
     Find the verb - have seen
     Who or what have seen?
     You have seen, so you is the subject.
     Have you seen my coat?


Instructions: Find the subject and verb in these interrogative sentences.

1. Has James left for home?

2. When did the noise begin?

3. Where is Jeanne attending college?

4. Did Jeff eat any dinner?

5. Will you return on Sunday?


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. Has James left for home?

2. When did the noise begin?

3. Where is Jeanne attending college?

4. Did Jeff eat any dinner?

5. Will you return on Sunday?
 

For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html.

Wednesday, December 23, 2020

Lesson 93 - Parts of the Sentence - Subject/Verb

View lesson on Daily Grammar

A simple sentence is a group of words expressing a complete thought, and it must have a subject and a verb (predicate - some grammar books use the word predicate, but I will use verb).  A verb shows action or state of being.  The subject tells who or what about the verb.  When finding the subject and the verb in a sentence, always find the verb first and then say who or what followed by the verb.

     Example:
     The bell rang.
     Find the verb - rang
     Who or what rang?
     The bell rang, so bell is the subject.
     The bell rang.

An imperative sentence gives a command or makes a request.     
 
     Examples:
     Hand it in now. 
     Stop.
 
Imperative sentences always have an understood but not stated you as the subject. 
 
     Examples:
     Hand it in now. (You) hand it in now.
     Stop. (You) stop.
 
Instructions: Find the subject and verb in the following imperative sentences.

1. Give me the gun!

2. Help me please.

3. Bring me the paper.

4. Lock the car door always.

5. Run next door for some sugar.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. Give me the gun! (understood you)

2. Help me please. (understood you)

3. Bring me the paper. (understood you)

4. Lock the car door always. (understood you)

5. Run next door for some sugar. (understood you)
 

For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html.

Tuesday, December 22, 2020

Lesson 92 - Parts of the Sentence - Subject/Verb

View lesson on Daily Grammar

A simple sentence is a group of words expressing a complete thought, and it must have a subject and a verb (predicate - some grammar books use the word predicate, but I will use verb).  A verb shows action or state of being.  The subject tells who or what about the verb.  When finding the subject and the verb in a sentence, always find the verb first and then say who or what followed by the verb.

     Example:
     The bell rang.
     Find the verb - rang
     Who or what rang?
     The bell rang, so bell is the subject.
     The bell rang.

     Example:
     The boy is here.
     Find the verb - is
     Who or what is?
     The boy is, so boy is the subject.
     The boy is here.

There are four (4) kinds of sentences: declarative, imperative, interrogative, and exclamatory.

1. A declarative sentence makes a statement.

     Example:
     The assignment is due tomorrow.

2. An imperative sentence gives a command or makes a request.

     Examples:
     Hand it in now. (understood you)
     Stop. (understood you)

3. An interrogative sentence asks a question.

     Example:
     Do you know the man?

4. An exclamatory sentence shows strong feeling. Declarative, imperative, or interrogative sentences can be made into exclamatory sentences by punctuating them with an exclamation point.

     Examples:
     The assignment is due tomorrow!
     Stop!
     Do you know the man!

Instructions: Find the subject and verb in the following sentences.

1. The programs are on the piano.

2. The kittens were under the straw stack.

3. He will be here soon.

4. The weather seems cooler.

5. The money must be on the table.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. The programs are on the piano.

2. The kittens were under the straw stack.

3. He will be here soon.
     - verb phrase using a helping verb will

4. The weather seems cooler.

5. The money must be on the table.
     - verb phrase using a helping verb must
 
Note: These verbs are all linking verbs.


For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html.

Monday, December 21, 2020

Lesson 91 - Parts of the Sentence - Subject/Verb

View lesson on Daily Grammar

A simple sentence is a group of words expressing a complete thought, and it must have a subject and a verb (predicate - some grammar books use the word predicate, but I will use verb).  A verb shows action or state of being.  The subject tells who or what about the verb.  When finding the subject and the verb in a sentence, always find the verb first and then say who or what followed by the verb.

     Example:
     The bell rang.
     Find the verb - rang
     Who or what rang?
     The bell rang, so bell is the subject.
     The bell rang.

     Example:
     The boy is here.
     Find the verb - is
     Who or what is?
     The boy is, so boy is the subject.
     The boy is here.

There are four (4) kinds of sentences: declarative, imperative, interrogative, and exclamatory.

1. A declarative sentence makes a statement.

     Example:
     The assignment is due tomorrow.

2. An imperative sentence gives a command or makes a request.

     Examples:
     Hand it in now. (understood you)
     Stop. (understood you)

3. An interrogative sentence asks a question.

     Example:
     Do you know the man?

4. An exclamatory sentence shows strong feeling. Declarative, imperative, or interrogative sentences can be made into exclamatory sentences by punctuating them with an exclamation point.

     Examples:
     The assignment is due tomorrow!
     Stop!
     Do you know the man!

Instructions: Find the subject and verb in the following sentences.

1. Karen went to the mall.

2. Carl didn't help his dad.

3. Mom cooks breakfast every morning.

4. I want a new bike for Christmas.

5. Ann has had a new baby girl.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. Karen went to the mall.

2. Carl didn't help his dad.
     - verb phrase using a helping verb did

3. Mom cooks breakfast every morning.

4. I want a new bike for Christmas.

5. Ann has had a new baby girl.
     - verb phrase using a helping verb has

Note: These verbs are all action verbs.


For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html.