Thursday, July 18, 2019

Lesson 239 - Parts of the Sentence - Verbals

View lesson on Daily Grammar

A verbal is a verb form used as some other part of speech. There are three kinds of verbals: gerunds, participles and infinitives.

A gerund always ends in ing and is used as a noun. Eating is fun.

A participle is used as an adjective and ends in various ways. A present participle always ends with ing as does the gerund, but remember that it is an adjective. A past participle ends with ed, n, or irregularly. Examples: played, broken, brought, sung, seeing, having seen, being seen, seen, having been seen.

An infinitive is to plus a verb form. It can be a noun, an adjective, or an adverb. Examples: to be, to see, to be seen, to be eaten.

Instructions: Find the gerunds, gerund phrases, participles, participial phrases, infinitives or infinitive phrases in these sentences, tell what kind of verbal they are, and how they are used.

1. The glancing blow did little damage.

2. Go to the dictionary to look for the answer.

3. This computer game is easy to play and to understand.

4. Have you tried writing it down daily?

5. His chief interests are skiing and racing.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. glancing is a participle modifying the subject blow

2. to look for the answer is an adverb infinitive phrase modifying the verb go

3. to play/to understand are adverb infinitives modifying the predicate adjective easy

4. writing it down daily is a gerund phrase used as the direct object

5. skiing/racing are gerunds used as predicate nominatives



For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html.

Wednesday, July 17, 2019

Lesson 238 - Parts of the Sentence - Verbals

View lesson on Daily Grammar

A verbal is a verb form used as some other part of speech. There are three kinds of verbals: gerunds, participles and infinitives.

A gerund always ends in ing and is used as a noun. Eating is fun.

A participle is used as an adjective and ends in various ways. A present participle always ends with ing as does the gerund, but remember that it is an adjective. A past participle ends with ed, n, or irregularly. Examples: played, broken, brought, sung, seeing, having seen, being seen, seen, having been seen.

An infinitive is to plus a verb form. It can be a noun, an adjective, or an adverb. Examples: to be, to see, to be seen, to be eaten.

Instructions: Find the gerunds, gerund phrases, participles, participial phrases, infinitives or infinitive phrases in these sentences, tell what kind of verbal they are, and how they are used.

1. Blaming others is not being honest with oneself.

2. We do not plan to change the rules.

3. Forgetting his promise, Jeff returned home late.

4. My dog is too old to learn new tricks.

5. One way to improve is regular practice.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. blaming others is a gerund phrase used as the subject

2. to change the rules is a noun infinitive phrase used as the direct object

3. forgetting his promise is a participial phrase modifying the subject Jeff

4. to learn new tricks is an adverb infinitive phrase modifying the predicate adjective old

5. to improve is an adjective infinitive modifying the subject way



For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html.

Tuesday, July 16, 2019

Lesson 237 - Parts of the Sentence - Verbals

View lesson on Daily Grammar

A verbal is a verb form used as some other part of speech. There are three kinds of verbals: gerunds, participles and infinitives.

A gerund always ends in ing and is used as a noun. Eating is fun.

A participle is used as an adjective and ends in various ways. A present participle always ends with ing as does the gerund, but remember that it is an adjective. A past participle ends with ed, n, or irregularly. Examples: played, broken, brought, sung, seeing, having seen, being seen, seen, having been seen.

An infinitive is to plus a verb form. It can be a noun, an adjective, or an adverb. Examples: to be, to see, to be seen, to be eaten.

Instructions: Find the gerunds, gerund phrases, participles, participial phrases, infinitives or infinitive phrases in these sentences, tell what kind of verbal they are, and how they are used.

1. Signs hung too high can't be read.

2. You know my weakness, eating late at night.

3. Your weeping and wailing will not change a thing.

4. To decorate for the dance will cost too much.

5. Do you have a book to read?


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. hung too high is a participial phrase modifying the subject signs

2. eating late at night is a gerund phrase used as an appositive

3. your weeping/wailing are gerunds used as subjects

4. to decorate for the dance is a noun infinitive phrase used as the subject

5. to read is an adverb infinitive modifying the verb do have



For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html.

Monday, July 15, 2019

Lesson 236 - Parts of the Sentence - Verbals

View lesson on Daily Grammar

A verbal is a verb form used as some other part of speech. There are three kinds of verbals: gerunds, participles and infinitives.

A gerund always ends in ing and is used as a noun. Eating is fun.

A participle is used as an adjective and ends in various ways. A present participle always ends with ing as does the gerund, but remember that it is an adjective. A past participle ends with ed, n, or irregularly. Examples: played, broken, brought, sung, seeing, having seen, being seen, seen, having been seen.

An infinitive is to plus a verb form. It can be a noun, an adjective, or an adverb. Examples: to be, to see, to be seen, to be eaten.

Instructions: Find the gerunds, gerund phrases, participles, participial phrases, infinitives or infinitive phrases in these sentences, tell what kind of verbal they are, and how they are used.

1. To see better, I got new glasses.

2. Sometimes I just need to do more.

3. Having changed his mind, he turned to go.

4. The team winning the match will be given new shirts.

5. You can go home only by crossing the street.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. to see better is an adverb infinitive phrase modifying the verb got

2. to do more is a noun infinitive phrase used as the direct object

3. having changed his mind is a participial phrase modifying the subject he/to go is an adverb infinitive modifying the verb turned

4. winning the match is a participial phrase modifying the subject team

5. crossing the street is a gerund phrase used as the object of the preposition



For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html.

Saturday, July 13, 2019

Quiz for Lessons 231 - 235 - Parts of the Sentence - Adverb Infinitives

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Instructions: Find the infinitives or infinitive phrases in these sentences and tell what word they modify.

1. The salesman is likely to go and to return in one day.

2. The crowd had come to demonstrate against his cruelty.

3. I would be happy to help you.

4. Frightened by the bear, I was unable to move or run.

5. No one came to see the old man.

6. The commentator stopped to clarify his statement.

7. In this storm it is hard to see.

8. The deer returned to eat more from our yard.

9. We stopped to view the beautiful sunset.

10. I was able to grab the rope and climb to safety.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. to go/to return in one day modify the predicate adjective likely

2. to demonstrate against his cruelty modifies the verb had come

3. to help you modifies the predicate adjective happy

4. to move/(to) run modify the predicate adjective unable

5. to see the old man modifies the verb came

6. to clarify his statement modifies the verb stopped

7. to see modifies the predicate adjective hard

8. to eat more from our yard modifies the verb returned

9. to view the beautiful sunset modifies the verb stopped

10. to grab the rope/(to) climb to safety modify the predicate adjective able



For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html.

Friday, July 12, 2019

Lesson 235 - Parts of the Sentence - Verbals - Adverb Infinitives

View lesson on Daily Grammar

An infinitive is to plus a verb form. It can be used as an adverb. Examples: to be, to see, to be seen, to be eaten.

Adverb infinitives are used to modify verbs. They usually tell why. Adverb infinitives are used to modify predicate adjectives. They may also be compound.

An infinitive phrase is made up of an infinitive and any complements (direct objects, predicate nominatives, predicate adjectives, or modifiers.) An infinitive phrase that comes at the beginning of the sentence is always followed by a comma and modifies the subject of the sentence.

Instructions: Find the infinitives or infinitive phrases in these sentences and tell what word they modify.

1. The inspector came to check the dam for leaks.

2. Fred finally went to work.

3. Paul arrived in New York to study physics and to learn more.

4. Are you old enough to drive?

5. The new soldiers were ready to listen and obey.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. to check the dam for leaks modifies the verb came

2. to work modifies the verb went

3. to study physics/to learn more modify the verb arrived

4. to drive modifies the predicate adjective old

5. to listen/(to) obey modify the predicate adjective ready



For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html.

Thursday, July 11, 2019

Lesson 234 - Parts of the Sentence - Verbals - Adverb Infinitives

View lesson on Daily Grammar

An infinitive is to plus a verb form. It can be used as an adverb. Examples: to be, to see, to be seen, to be eaten.

Adverb infinitives are used to modify verbs. They usually tell why. Adverb infinitives are used to modify predicate adjectives. They may also be compound.

An infinitive phrase is made up of an infinitive and any complements (direct objects, predicate nominatives, predicate adjectives, or modifiers.) An infinitive phrase that comes at the beginning of the sentence is always followed by a comma and modifies the subject of the sentence.

Instructions: Find the infinitive phrases in these sentences and tell what word they modify.

1. The actors performed there to entertain and to be seen.

2. The amount of danger was impossible to imagine or to describe.

3. I have come to ask a favor and to seek your help.

4. Are you unable to see or to read the sign?

5. The bucking horse jumped high to throw me and to break my neck.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. to entertain/to be seen modify the verb performed

2. to imagine/to describe modify the predicate adjective impossible

3. to ask a favor/to seek your help modify the verb have come

4. to see/to read the sign modify the predicate adjective unable

5. to throw me/to break my neck modify the verb jumped



For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html.

Wednesday, July 10, 2019

Lesson 233 - Parts of the Sentence - Verbals - Adverb Infinitives

View lesson on Daily Grammar

An infinitive is to plus a verb form. It can be used as an adverb. Examples: to be, to see, to be seen, to be eaten.

Adverb infinitives are used to modify predicate adjectives.

An infinitive phrase is made up of an infinitive and any complements (direct objects, predicate nominatives, predicate adjectives, or modifiers.) An infinitive phrase that comes at the beginning of the sentence is always followed by a comma and modifies the subject of the sentence.

Instructions: Find the infinitives or infinitive phrases in these sentences and tell what word they modify.

1. The van is ready to go.

2. You are sure to meet him again.

3. My horse is hard to catch.

4. I am happy to be of service.

5. Joan is likely to change her mind.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. to go modifies the predicate adjective ready

2. to meet him again modifies the predicate adjective sure

3. to catch modifies the predicate adjective hard

4. to be of service modifies the predicate adjective happy

5. to change her mind modifies the predicate adjective likely



For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html.

Tuesday, July 9, 2019

Lesson 232 - Parts of the Sentence - Verbals - Adverb Infinitives

View lesson on Daily Grammar

An infinitive is to plus a verb form. It can be used as an adverb. Examples: to be, to see, to be seen, to be eaten.

Adverb infinitives are used to modify verbs. They usually tell why.

An infinitive phrase is made up of an infinitive and any complements (direct objects, predicate nominatives, predicate adjectives, or modifiers.) An infinitive phrase that comes at the beginning of the sentence is always followed by a comma and modifies the subject of the sentence.

Instructions: Find the infinitive phrases in these sentences and tell what word they modify.

1. She came to explain the answer.

2. The kids went to see the circus.

3. On the rough road I drove carefully to prevent any damage.

4. I returned a different way to avoid further damage.

5. We stopped at a cafe to eat lunch.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. to explain the answer modifies the verb came

2. to see the circus modifies the verb went

3. to prevent any damage modifies the verb drove

4. to avoid further damage modifies the verb returned

5. to eat lunch modifies the verb stopped



For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html.

Monday, July 8, 2019

Lesson 231 - Parts of the Sentence - Verbals - Adverb Infinitives

View lesson on Daily Grammar

An infinitive is to plus a verb form. It can be used as an adverb. Examples: to be, to see, to be seen, to be eaten.

Adverb infinitives are used to modify verbs. They usually tell why.

An infinitive phrase is made up of an infinitive and any complements (direct objects, predicate nominatives, predicate adjectives, or modifiers.) An infinitive phrase that comes at the beginning of the sentence is always followed by a comma and modifies the subject of the sentence.

Instructions: Find the infinitives in these sentences and tell what word they modify.

1. The man came to confess.

2. We should study to learn.

3. The girls were waiting to be asked.

4. Our neighbor called to apologize.

5. I went to the hospital to rest.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. to confess modifies the verb came

2. to learn modifies the verb should study

3. to be asked modifies the verb were waiting

4. to apologize modifies the verb called

5. to rest modifies the verb went



For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html.

Saturday, July 6, 2019

Quiz for Lessons 226 - 230 - Parts of the Sentence - Participles

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Instructions: Combine these sentences using a participial phrase.

1. I strolled down the lane. I was enjoying the fragrant air.

2. My dog wanted his meal. He was begging at my feet.

3. The contestant crossed her fingers for luck. She hoped it was the right answer.

4. The paramedic leaned over the victim. He was checking for vital signs.

5. The man shouted for help. He was hanging on the side of the boat.

Instructions: Rewrite these sentences so the participial phrase is used correctly.

6. Drinking in gulps, the pitcher was emptied.

7. Convinced of my honesty, I was allowed to leave.

8. Watching the sunset, the evening was beautiful.

9. Hanging in the closet, I found my new suit.

10. We saw several caves walking through the mountains.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. Enjoying the fragrant air, I strolled down the lane.

2. Begging at my feet, my dog wanted his meal.

3. Hoping it was the right answer, the contestant crossed her fingers for luck.

4. Checking for vital signs, the paramedic leaned over the victim.

5. Hanging on the side of the boat, the man shouted for help.

6. Drinking in gulps, I emptied the pitcher.

7. Convinced of my honesty, the police allowed me to leave.

8. Watching the sunset, I found the evening beautiful.

9. I found my new suit hanging in the closet.

10. Walking through the mountains, we saw several caves.



For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html.

Friday, July 5, 2019

Lesson 230 - Parts of the Sentence - Verbals - Participles

View lesson on Daily Grammar

A participle is used as an adjective and ends various ways. A present participle always ends with ing as does the gerund, but remember that it is an adjective. A past participle ends with ed, n, or irregularly. Examples: played, broken, brought, sung, seeing, having seen, being seen, seen, having been seen. Participles modify nouns and pronouns and can precede or follow the word modified. (Do not confuse participles that end in ing with gerunds. Participles are used as adjectives; gerunds are used as nouns.)

A participial phrase is made up of a participle and any complements (direct objects, predicate nominatives, predicate adjectives, or modifiers) like the gerund. A participial phrase that comes at the beginning of the sentence is always followed by a comma and modifies the subject of the sentence.

Participial phrases sometimes appear to modify a word that they cannot logically modify. The word it should modify does not appear in the sentence.

Instructions: Rewrite the following sentences by rearranging the words or by adding a word or words to make them clear and logical.

1. Looking over the outlook, the canyon seemed magnificent.

2. Typing my research paper, the keys jammed.

3. Playing the piano, my dog started to howl.

4. Eating lunch, the doorbell rang.

5. Having walked several miles, my new shoes hurt.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. Looking over the outlook, I saw a magnificent canyon.

2. Typing my research paper, I jammed the keys.

3. Playing the piano, I caused my dog to start to howl.

4. Eating lunch, she heard the doorbell ring.

5. Having walked several miles, I had sore feet from my new shoes.

(You must add a word to be the subject.)



For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html.

Thursday, July 4, 2019

Lesson 229 - Parts of the Sentence - Verbals - Participles

View lesson on Daily Grammar

A participle is used as an adjective and ends various ways. A present participle always ends with ing as does the gerund, but remember that it is an adjective. A past participle ends with ed, n, or irregularly. Examples: played, broken, brought, sung, seeing, having seen, being seen, seen, having been seen. Participles modify nouns and pronouns and can precede or follow the word modified. (Do not confuse participles that end in ing with gerunds. Participles are used as adjectives; gerunds are used as nouns.)

A participial phrase is made up of a participle and any complements (direct objects, predicate nominatives, predicate adjectives, or modifiers) like the gerund. A participial phrase that comes at the beginning of the sentence is always followed by a comma and modifies the subject of the sentence.

Participial phrases are sometimes misplaced in a sentence causing confusion.

Instructions: Rewrite the following sentences placing the participial phrases where they should be.

1. Carl served me a malt dressed in his new uniform.

2. We found our cat walking home from school.

3. I was stung by a bee pruning my trees.

4. They found an antique store looking for a place to eat.

5. The package was delivered by the mailman wrapped with red paper.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. Dressed in his new uniform, Carl served me a malt.

2. Walking home from school, we found our cat.

3. Pruning my trees, I was stung by a bee.

4. Looking for a place to eat, they found an antique store.

5. The package, wrapped with red paper, was delivered by the mailman.



For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html.

Wednesday, July 3, 2019

Lesson 228 - Parts of the Sentence - Verbals - Participles

View lesson on Daily Grammar

A participle is used as an adjective and ends various ways. A present participle always ends with ing as does the gerund, but remember that it is an adjective. A past participle ends with ed, n, or irregularly. Examples: played, broken, brought, sung, seeing, having seen, being seen, seen, having been seen. Participles modify nouns and pronouns and can precede or follow the word modified. (Do not confuse participles that end in ing with gerunds. Participles are used as adjectives; gerunds are used as nouns.)

A participial phrase is made up of a participle and any complements (direct objects, predicate nominatives, predicate adjectives, or modifiers) like the gerund. A participial phrase that comes at the beginning of the sentence is always followed by a comma and modifies the subject of the sentence.

Participial phrases are useful in combining pairs of sentences.

Instructions: Combine the following sentences using a participial phrase at the beginning of the sentence.

1. The flag flapped against the pole. The flag was twisted by the wind.

2. The cat clawed wildly in self-defense. The cat was cornered by two dogs.

3. The food was completely destroyed. It had been covered by the flood for two weeks.

4. Dr. Doolittle commanded the bee to stop the noise. He was annoyed by the humming.

5. We had planned a party for our boss. We were pleased with our bonuses.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. Twisted by the wind, the flag flapped against the pole.

2. Cornered by two dogs, the cat clawed wildly in self-defense.

3. Having been covered by the flood for two weeks, the food was completely destroyed.

4. Annoyed by the humming, Dr. Doolittle commanded the bee to stop the noise.

5. Pleased with our bonuses, we had planned a party for our boss.



For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html.

Tuesday, July 2, 2019

Lesson 227 - Parts of the Sentence - Verbals - Participles

View lesson on Daily Grammar

A participle is used as an adjective and ends various ways. A present participle always ends with ing as does the gerund, but remember that it is an adjective. A past participle ends with ed, n, or irregularly. Examples: played, broken, brought, sung, seeing, having seen, being seen, seen, having been seen. Participles modify nouns and pronouns and can precede or follow the word modified. (Do not confuse participles that end in ing with gerunds. Participles are used as adjectives; gerunds are used as nouns.)

A participial phrase is made up of a participle and any complements (direct objects, predicate nominatives, predicate adjectives, or modifiers) like the gerund. A participial phrase that comes at the beginning of the sentence is always followed by a comma and modifies the subject of the sentence.

Participial phrases are useful in combining pairs of sentences.

Instructions: Combine the following sentences using a participial phrase at the beginning of the sentence.

1. The thief pried strenuously at the window. He was grasping the crowbar with both hands.

2. The doctor examined the new patient. The doctor was hoping to find the problem.

3. The comedian took a final bow. The comedian was waving at the audience.

4. Ann sang quietly to herself. She was taking a shower.

5. The horse pranced and whirled in circles. He was approaching the starting gate.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. Grasping the crowbar with both hands, the thief pried strenuously at the window.

2. Hoping to find the problem, the doctor examined the new patient.

3. Waving at the audience, the comedian took a final bow.

4. Taking a shower, Ann sang quietly to herself.

5. Approaching the starting gate, the horse pranced and whirled in circles.



For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html.

Monday, July 1, 2019

Lesson 226 - Parts of the Sentence - Verbals - Participles

View lesson on Daily Grammar

A participle is used as an adjective and ends various ways. A present participle always ends with ing as does the gerund, but remember that it is an adjective. A past participle ends with ed, n, or irregularly. Examples: played, broken, brought, sung, seeing, having seen, being seen, seen, having been seen. Participles modify nouns and pronouns and can precede or follow the word modified. (Do not confuse participles that end in ing with gerunds. Participles are used as adjectives; gerunds are used as nouns.)

A participial phrase is made up of a participle and any complements (direct objects, predicate nominatives, predicate adjectives, or modifiers) like the gerund. A participial phrase that comes at the beginning of the sentence is always followed by a comma and modifies the subject of the sentence.

Participial phrases are useful in combining pairs of sentences.

Instructions: Combine the following sentences using a participial phrase following the word it modifies.

1. The woman fed the pigeons. The woman was sitting on the park bench.

2. Jeanne finished the painting last month. The painting was hanging on the wall.

3. I really liked the blue sports car. The car was sitting in the showroom.

4. That man makes jewelry. He is getting into his car.

5. I carefully wrapped the package to be sure it was done correctly. The package was lying on the desk.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. The woman sitting on the park bench fed the pigeons.

2. Last month Jeanne finished the painting hanging on the wall.

3. I really liked the blue sports car sitting in the showroom.

4. That man getting into his car makes jewelry.

5. I carefully wrapped the package lying on the desk to be sure it was done correctly.



For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html.

Saturday, June 29, 2019

Quiz for Lessons 221 - 225 - Parts of the Sentence - Verbals

View quiz on Daily Grammar

Instructions: Find the infinitives, participles, and the participial and infinitive phrases in these sentences and tell what word they modify.

1. My attempts to comfort the lost boy were useless.

2. Having been left behind, the puppy gave a whining howl.

3. The exhausted men were given the signal to start the march.

4. The admired musician wants a person to study with him.

5. The screaming fans cheered their fighting team.

6. The droning lecture caused the students' heads to nod.

7. Having finished our work, we now had time to play.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. to comfort the lost boy modifies attempts; lost modifies boy

2. Having been left behind modifies puppy; whining modifies howl

3. exhausted modifies men; to start the march modifies signal

4. admired modifies musician; to study with him modifies person

5. screaming modifies fans; fighting modifies team

6. droning modifies lecture; to nod modifies heads

7. Having finished our work modifies we; to play modifies time



For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html.

Friday, June 28, 2019

Lesson 225 - Parts of the Sentence - Verbals - Participles/Adjective Infinitives

View lesson on Daily Grammar

A participle is used as an adjective and ends in various ways. A present participle always ends with ing as does the gerund, but remember that it is an adjective. A past participle ends with ed, n, or irregularly. Examples: played, broken, brought, sung, seeing, having seen, being seen, seen, having been seen. Participles modify nouns and pronouns and can precede or follow the word modified. (Do not confuse participles that end in ing with gerunds. Participles are used as adjectives; gerunds are used as nouns.)

A participial phrase is made up of a participle and any complements (direct objects, predicate nominatives, predicate adjectives, or modifiers) like the gerund. A participial phrase that comes at the beginning of the sentence is always followed by a comma and modifies the subject of the sentence.

An infinitive is to plus a verb form. It can be used as an adjective. Examples: to be, to see, to be seen, to be eaten.

An infinitive phrase is made up of an infinitive and any complements (direct objects, predicate nominatives, predicate adjectives, or modifiers) like the gerund. An infinitive phrase that comes at the beginning of the sentence is always followed by a comma and modifies the subject of the sentence.

Instructions: Find the participles and the participial and infinitive phrases in these sentences and tell what word they modify.

1. The money lying on the dresser is yours.

2. The crying child awakened everyone.

3. The heavy package to be sent was quickly loaded.

4. Hearing the noise, the girl was suddenly afraid.

5. There are several things to be considered first.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. lying on the dresser modifies money

2. crying modifies child

3. to be sent modifies package

4. Hearing the noise modifies girl

5. to be considered first modifies things



For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html.

Thursday, June 27, 2019

Lesson 224 - Parts of the Sentence - Verbals - Adjective Infinitives

View lesson on Daily Grammar

An infinitive is to plus a verb form. It can be used as an adjective. Examples: to be, to see, to be seen, to be eaten.

An infinitive phrase is made up of an infinitive and any complements (direct objects, predicate nominatives, predicate adjectives, or modifiers) like the gerund. An infinitive phrase that comes at the beginning of the sentence is always followed by a comma and modifies the subject of the sentence.

Instructions: Find the infinitive phrases in these sentences and tell what word they modify.

1. Your idea to spend the day together sounds great.

2. Joe is the man to see about the job.

3. We have no reason to doubt your sincerity.

4. This must be the best route to take.

5. Your attitude is the best attitude to have.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. to spend the day together modifies idea

2. to see about the job modifies man

3. to doubt your sincerity modifies reason

4. to take modifies route

5. to have modifies attitude



For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html.

Wednesday, June 26, 2019

Lesson 223 - Parts of the Sentence - Verbals - Participles

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A participle is used as an adjective and ends in various ways. A present participle always ends with ing as does the gerund, but remember that it is an adjective. A past participle ends with ed, n, or irregularly. Examples: played, broken, brought, sung, seeing, having seen, being seen, seen, having been seen. Participles modify nouns and pronouns and can precede or follow the word modified. (Do not confuse participles that end in ing with gerunds. Participles are used as adjectives; gerunds are used as nouns.)

A participial phrase is made up of a participle and any complements (direct objects, predicate nominatives, predicate adjectives, or modifiers) like the gerund. A participial phrase that comes at the beginning of the sentence is always followed by a comma and modifies the subject of the sentence.

Instructions: Find the participial phrases in these sentences and tell what word they modify.

1. The man running slowly still finished the race.

2. The boy having been scolded finally did his work.

3. The teacher, having retired, could now travel widely.

4. The soldier, having saluted his superior, continued on his way.

5. The truck swerving and sliding hit the brick wall.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. running slowly modifies man

2. having been scolded modifies boy

3. having retired modifies teacher

4. having saluted his superior modifies soldier

5. swerving and sliding modifies truck



For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html.

Tuesday, June 25, 2019

Lesson 222 - Parts of the Sentence - Verbals - Participles

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A participle is used as an adjective and ends in various ways. A present participle always ends with ing as does the gerund, but remember that it is an adjective. A past participle ends with ed, n, or irregularly. Examples: played, broken, brought, sung, seeing, having seen, being seen, seen, having been seen. Participles modify nouns and pronouns and can precede or follow the word modified. (Do not confuse participles that end in ing with gerunds. Participles are used as adjectives; gerunds are used as nouns.)

A participial phrase is made up of a participle and any complements (direct objects, predicate nominatives, predicate adjectives, or modifiers) like the gerund. A participial phrase that comes at the beginning of the sentence is always followed by a comma and modifies the subject of the sentence.

Instructions: Find the participial phrases in these sentences and tell what word they modify.

1. Taking my time, I hit the basket.

2. Shouting angrily, the man chased the thief.

3. Exhausted from the hike, Jim dropped to the ground.

4. Grinning sheepishly, the boy asked for a date.

5. Trying to open the gate, I tore my coat.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. Taking my time modifies the subject I

2. Shouting angrily modifies the subject man

3. Exhausted from the hike modifies the subject Jim

4. Grinning sheepishly modifies the subject boy

5. Trying to open the gate modifies the subject I



For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html.

Monday, June 24, 2019

Lesson 221 - Parts of the Sentence - Verbals - Participles

View lesson on Daily Grammar

A participle is used as an adjective and ends in various ways. A present participle always ends with ing as does the gerund, but remember that it is an adjective. A past participle ends with ed, n, or irregularly. Examples: played, broken, brought, sung, seeing, having seen, being seen, seen, having been seen. Participles modify nouns and pronouns and can precede or follow the word modified. (Do not confuse participles that end in ing with gerunds. Participles are used as adjectives; gerunds are used as nouns.)

Instructions: Find the participles in these sentences and tell what word they modify.

1. The bike had a broken spoke.

2. Her smiling face made everyone happy.

3. The frightened child was crying loudly.

4. The people were frightened by the growling dog.

5. The squeaking wheel needs some grease.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. broken modifying spoke

2. smiling modifying face

3. frightened modifying child

4. growling modifying dog

5. squeaking modifying wheel



For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html.

Saturday, June 22, 2019

Quiz for Lessons 216 - 220 - Parts of the Sentence - Verbals - Noun Infinitives

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Instructions: Find the noun infinitive phrases in the following sentences and tell how they are used.

1. To sit in judgment is a difficult task.

2. To waste time in class is foolishness.

3. To party and to sleep in were his only faults.

4. My grandfather wanted only to build a home and raise a family.

5. Barbara hopes to be home soon.

6. His joys were to play soccer and to visit friends.

7. To save money for a rainy day is a good idea.

8. The man's goal was to go to college and to study law.

9. Everyone wants to be rewarded for one's efforts.

10. Our desire is nothing but to live happily.


--For answers scroll down.












Answers:

1. to sit in judgment = subject

2. to waste time in class = subject

3. to party/to sleep in = subjects

4. to build a home/(to) raise a family = direct objects

5. to be home soon = direct object

6. to play soccer/to visit friends = predicate nominatives

7. to save money for a rainy day = subject

8. to go to college/to study law = predicate nominatives

9. to be rewarded for one's efforts = direct object

10. to live happily = object of the preposition



For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html.