Saturday, August 26, 2017

Quiz for Lessons 246 - 250 - Parts of the Sentence - Compound Sentences

Instructions: Tell whether the words in quotation marks are independent clauses, dependent clauses, prepositional phrases, participial phrases, gerund phrases, or infinitive phrases.

1. Do not leave for help "until I signal you."

2. "Here are the plants" that you wanted.

3. I remained "staring at the damage" when help arrived.

4. "Having learned the outcome," I was at a loss "to know what to do."

5. The neighbors stared "at me" in unbelief.

Instructions: Combine the following sentences with the appropriate co-ordinate conjunctions.

6. I turned on my radio. There was no sound.

7. The storm had ended. The sun peeked out from the clouds.

8. I did not attend the meeting. John didn't either.

9. You must leave soon. You will be late for class.

10. A phrase has neither a verb nor a subject. The clause has both.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. until I signal you = dependent clause

2. Here are the plants = independent clause

3. staring at the damage = participial phrase

4. Having learned the outcome = participial phrase, to know what to do = infinitive phrase

5. at me = prepositional phrase

6. I turned on the radio, but there was no sound.

7. The storm had ended, and the sun peeked out from the clouds.

8. I did not attend the meeting, nor did John.

9. You must leave soon, or you will be late for class.

10. A phrase has neither a verb nor a subject, but the clause has both.

For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html. Our lessons are also available to purchase in an eBook and a Workbook format.

Friday, August 25, 2017

Lesson 250 - Parts of the Sentence - Compound Sentences

A clause is a group of words having a subject and a verb. An independent clause can stand alone as a sentence. A dependent clause is always used as some part of speech. It can be an adjective, adverb, or noun. It cannot stand alone as a sentence.

A phrase is a group of words used as a sentence part. It does not have a subject and a verb. It can be a noun, adjective or adverb. We have studied the following phrases: prepositional, gerund, participial, and infinitive.

A compound sentence combines two or more independent clauses. Commas separate the clauses of a compound sentence. (A short sentence joined by and is sometimes combined without a comma.) Example: She talks and he listens. A semicolon can take the place of the conjunction and comma. Only clauses closely related in thought should be joined to make a compound sentence.

Instructions: Tell whether the words in quotation marks are independent clauses, dependent clauses, prepositional phrases, participial phrases, gerund phrases, or infinitive phrases.

1. "When I received the email," I knew it was "not to be opened."

2. When you go to the store, "buy some ice cream and cookies."

3. The vase must have been broken "by the grandchildren."

4. "Having been left alone," the boy jumped at every noise.

5. "Planning a successful wedding" requires lots of work.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. When I received the email = dependent clause, not to be opened = infinitive phrase

2. buy some ice cream and cookies = independent clause

3. by the grandchildren = prepositional phrase

4. Having been left alone = participial phrase

5. Planning a successful wedding = gerund phrase

For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html. Our lessons are also available to purchase in an eBook and a Workbook format.

Thursday, August 24, 2017

Lesson 249 - Parts of the Sentence - Compound Sentences

A clause is a group of words having a subject and a verb. An independent clause can stand alone as a sentence. A dependent clause is always used as some part of speech. It can be an adjective, adverb, or noun. It cannot stand alone as a sentence.

A phrase is a group of words used as a sentence part. It does not have a subject and a verb. It can be a noun, adjective or adverb. We have studied the following phrases: prepositional, gerund, participial, and infinitive.

A compound sentence combines two or more independent clauses. Commas separate the clauses of a compound sentence. (A short sentence joined by and is sometimes combined without a comma.) Example: She talks and he listens. A semicolon can take the place of the conjunction and comma. Only clauses closely related in thought should be joined to make a compound sentence.

The conjunction should express the proper relationship between the clauses. And joins ideas of equal importance. Or joins clauses that express alternatives. Nor joins negative ideas together. But joins clauses that express contrasting ideas.

Do not confuse a compound sentence with a simple sentence having compound parts. Both sides of the conjunction will make sense in a compound sentence. Example: Mother baked a cake / and / I frosted it.

Instructions: Tell whether the following sentences are compound sentences or not. If they are not, tell which compound part they are.

1. The girl just sat there but said nothing.

2. I looked for the book, but I could not find it.

3. Jeff must have arrived safely, or we would have been notified.

4. One of my friends and his dad have flown to Brazil.

5. Everyone was playing or swimming in the pool.

6. Suddenly the rain poured down, and the party was ruined.

7. We will vacation in the Black Hills or at Waterton.

8. I haven't heard from Becky, nor do I expect a call soon.

9. I climbed the tree and looked in the bird's nest.

10. She planned to read the letter, but it could not be found.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. compound verb

2. compound sentence

3. compound sentence

4. compound subject

5. compound verb

6. compound sentence

7. compound object of the preposition

8. compound sentence

9. compound verb

10. compound sentence

For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html. Our lessons are also available to purchase in an eBook and a Workbook format.

Wednesday, August 23, 2017

Lesson 248 - Parts of the Sentence - Compound Sentences

A clause is a group of words having a subject and a verb. An independent clause can stand alone as a sentence. A dependent clause is always used as some part of speech. It can be an adjective, adverb, or noun. It cannot stand alone as a sentence.

A phrase is a group of words used as a sentence part. It does not have a subject and a verb. It can be a noun, adjective or adverb. We have studied the following phrases: prepositional, gerund, participial, and infinitive.

A compound sentence combines two or more independent clauses. Commas separate the clauses of a compound sentence. (A short sentence joined by and is sometimes combined without a comma.) Example: She talks and he listens. A semicolon can take the place of the conjunction and comma. Only clauses closely related in thought should be joined to make a compound sentence.

The conjunction should express the proper relationship between the clauses. And joins ideas of equal importance. Or joins clauses that express alternatives. Nor joins negative ideas together. But joins clauses that express contrasting ideas.

Instructions: Combine the following sentences using the appropriate co-ordinate conjunctions, and, but, or, nor.

1. Mother wanted to watch the movie. Dad wanted to see the wrestling.

2. You must remember your password. You cannot log on.

3. I wanted to walk across the river. The ice was too thin.

4. It was a warm, beautiful day. My desires matched the day perfectly.

5. You did not help you brother. He doesn't expect you to help him.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. Mother wanted to watch the movie, but Dad wanted to see the wrestling.

2. You must remember your password, or you cannot log on.

3. I wanted to walk across the river, but the ice was too thin.

4. It was a warm, beautiful day, and my desires matched the day perfectly.

5. You did not help your brother, nor does he expect you to do so.

For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html. Our lessons are also available to purchase in an eBook and a Workbook format.

Tuesday, August 22, 2017

Lesson 247 - Parts of the Sentence - Compound Sentences

A clause is a group of words having a subject and a verb. An independent clause can stand alone as a sentence. A dependent clause is always used as some part of speech. It can be an adjective, adverb, or noun. It cannot stand alone as a sentence.

A phrase is a group of words used as a sentence part. It does not have a subject and a verb. It can be a noun, adjective or adverb. We have studied the following phrases: prepositional, gerund, participial, and infinitive.

A compound sentence combines two or more independent clauses. Commas separate the clauses of a compound sentence. (A short sentence joined by and is sometimes combined without a comma.) Example: She talks and he listens. A semicolon can take the place of the conjunction and comma. Only clauses closely related in thought should be joined to make a compound sentence.

Instructions: Tell if the following sentences are good combinations.

1. Mr. Jones is a very short man, but he walks with an air of authority.

2. Today has been very warm, and I have some English lessons to write.

3. I have again been to Mexico, but I don't expect to return soon.

4. My dog is a short, stupid-looking dog, but he is very smart.

5. The mail comes about noon each day, and I need to weed the flowers.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. a good combination

2. a poor combination

3. a good combination

4. a good combination

5. a poor combination

For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html. Our lessons are also available to purchase in an eBook and a Workbook format.

Monday, August 21, 2017

Lesson 246 - Parts of the Sentence - Compound Sentences

A clause is a group of words having a subject and a verb. An independent clause can stand alone as a sentence. A dependent clause is always used as some part of speech. It can be an adjective, adverb, or noun. It cannot stand alone as a sentence.

A phrase is a group of words used as a sentence part. It does not have a subject and a verb. It can be a noun, adjective or adverb. We have studied the following phrases: prepositional, gerund, participial, and infinitive.

A compound sentence combines two or more independent clauses. Commas separate the clauses of a compound sentence. (A short sentence joined by and is sometimes combined without a comma.) Example: She talks and he listens. A semicolon can take the place of the conjunction and comma. Only clauses closely related in thought should be joined to make a compound sentence.

Instructions: Tell whether each group of words is a clause or a phrase.

1. Before the gate broke

2. After having eaten

3. In answer to your question

4. How I will mark the reports

5. Made of sweat and blood

6. Upon whom the blame lies

7. By remaining totally still

8. Why did you stop

9. After everyone ceased shouting

10. To take me home


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. clause

2. phrase

3. phrase

4. clause

5. phrase

6. clause

7. phrase

8. clause

9. clause

10. phrase

For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html. Our lessons are also available to purchase in an eBook and a Workbook format.

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