Saturday, June 17, 2017

Quiz for Lessons 201-205 - Parts of the Sentence - Conjunctions

Instructions: As a review of all the parts of the sentence, in the following sentences find the conjunctions and tell whether they are co-ordinate or correlative conjunctions, and then tell how each of the other words are used.

1. The consultant gave Mother and Dad some helpful hints.

2. Dot was an old but reliable pinto horse.

3. My mother knits slowly but very surely.

4. The little girls raced down the street and into the playground.

5. Yesterday was not only hot but also really windy.

6. I have visited both the Boardwalk and Broadway.

7. Either Jenny or your sister will call about the party.

8. Then she stopped at the service station for some gas or oil.

9. The water in the Pacific Ocean was very rough and cold.

10. The injured one was neither Burt nor Bob.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. and = co-ordinate conjunction; gave =verb; consultant = subject; hints = direct object; Mother/Dad = indirect objects; the/some/helpful = adjectives

2. but = co-ordinate conjunction; was = verb; Dot = subject; horse = predicate nominative; an/old/reliable/pinto = adjectives

3. but = co-ordinate conjunction; knits = verb; mother = subject; my = adjective; slowly/very/surely = adverbs

4. and = co-ordinate conjunction; raced = verb; girls = subject; down/into = prepositions; street/playground = object of the prepositions; the/little/the/the = adjectives

5. not only/but also = correlative conjunction; was = verb; yesterday = subject; hot/windy = predicate adjectives; really = adverb

6. both/and = correlative conjunction; have visited = verb; I = subject; Boardwalk/Broadway = direct objects; the = adjectives

7. either/or = correlative conjunction; will call = verb; Jenny/sister = subject; about = preposition; party = object of the preposition; your/the = adjectives

8. or = co-ordinate conjunction; stopped = verb; she = subject; at/for = preposition; station/gas/oil = objects of the prepositions; the/service/some = adjectives; then = adverb

9. and = co-ordinate conjunction; was = verb; water = subject; rough/cold = predicate adjective; in = preposition; Pacific Ocean = object of the preposition; the/the = adjectives; very = adverb

10. neither/nor = correlative conjunction; was = verb; one = subject; Burt/Bob = predicate nominative; the/injured = adjectives

For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html. Our lessons are also available to purchase in an eBook and a Workbook format.

Friday, June 16, 2017

Lesson 205 - Parts of the Sentence - Conjunctions

A conjunction is a word that joins other words, phrases, or clauses. Co-ordinate conjunctions join words, phases, or clauses of equal rank. There are two kinds simple and correlative. The simple co-ordinate conjunctions are the following: and, but, or, and nor. The correlative co-ordinate conjunctions are always in pairs. They are either-or, neither-nor, both-and, not only-but also, and whether-or.

In these lessons simple co-ordinates will be referred to as co-ordinate conjunctions, and correlative co-ordinates will be referred to as correlative conjunctions. The co-ordinate and correlative conjunctions should be memorized since they are common and few in number.

Instructions: As a review of all the parts of the sentence, in the following sentences find the conjunctions and tell whether they are co-ordinate or correlative conjunctions, and then tell how each of the other words are used.

1. In our garden several small but productive trees are growing.

2. Dad waited for Barbara, Jeanne and me.

3. I must leave this place secretly and quietly.

4. After the hike the group was tired and hungry.

5. The coyote ran into a hole or into some trees.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. but = co-ordinate conjunction; are growing = verb; trees = subject; in = preposition; garden = object of the preposition; our/several/small/productive = adjectives

2. and = co-ordinate conjunction; waited = verb; Dad = subject; for = preposition; Barbara/Jeanne/me = object of the preposition

3. and = co-ordinate conjunction; must leave = verb; I = subject; place = direct object; this = adjective; secretly/quietly = adverbs

4. and = co-ordinate conjunction; was = verb; group = subject; tired/hungry = predicate adjectives; after = preposition; hike = object of the preposition; the/the = adjective

5. or = co-ordinate conjunction; ran = verb; coyote = subject; into/into = preposition; hole/trees = object of the preposition; the/a/some = adjectives

For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html. Our lessons are also available to purchase in an eBook and a Workbook format.

Thursday, June 15, 2017

Lesson 204 - Parts of the Sentence - Conjunctions

A conjunction is a word that joins other words, phrases, or clauses. Co-ordinate conjunctions join words, phases, or clauses of equal rank. There are two kinds simple and correlative. The simple co-ordinate conjunctions are the following: and, but, or, and nor. The correlative co-ordinate conjunctions are always in pairs. They are either-or, neither-nor, both-and, not only-but also, and whether-or.

In these lessons simple co-ordinates will be referred to as co-ordinate conjunctions, and correlative co-ordinates will be referred to as correlative conjunctions. The co-ordinate and correlative conjunctions should be memorized since they are common and few in number.

Instructions: As a review of all the parts of the sentence, in the following sentences find the conjunctions and tell whether they are co-ordinate or correlative conjunctions, and then tell how each of the other words are used.

1. The very happy guests laughed and talked with the hosts.

2. They will invite both Joe and his wife tomorrow.

3. Two hot drinks, coffee and tea, will be served daily.

4. Their first visitors were Lottie and Elaine.

5. We neither saw nor heard anything important.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. and = co-ordinate conjunction; laughed/talked = verbs; guests = subject; with = preposition; hosts = object of the preposition; the/happy/the = adjectives; very = adverb

2. both/and = correlative conjunction; will invite =verb; they = subject; Joe/wife = direct objects; his = adjective; tomorrow = adverb

3. and = co-ordinate conjunction; will be served = verb; drinks = subject; coffee/tea = appositives; two/hot = adjectives; daily = adverb

4. and = co-ordinate conjunction; were = verb; visitors = subject; Lottie/Elaine = predicate nominatives; their/first = adjectives

5. neither/nor = correlative; saw/heard = verbs; we = subject; anything = direct object; important = object complement

For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html. Our lessons are also available to purchase in an eBook and a Workbook format.

Wednesday, June 14, 2017

Lesson 203 - Parts of the Sentence - Conjunctions

A conjunction is a word that joins other words, phrases, or clauses. Co-ordinate conjunctions join words, phases, or clauses of equal rank. There are two kinds simple and correlative. The simple co-ordinate conjunctions are the following: and, but, or, and nor. The correlative co-ordinate conjunctions are always in pairs. They are either-or, neither-nor, both-and, not only-but also, and whether-or.

In these lessons simple co-ordinates will be referred to as co-ordinate conjunctions, and correlative co-ordinates will be referred to as correlative conjunctions. The co-ordinate and correlative conjunctions should be memorized since they are common and few in number.

Instructions: As a review of all the parts of the sentence, in the following sentences find the conjunctions and tell whether they are co-ordinate or correlative conjunctions, and then tell how each of the other words are used.

1. The basketball team scored quickly and easily.

2. The wrestler was a small but strong individual.

3. Neither Helen nor her family will associate with us.

4. Jim, Jeff and Shawn went to Wendover but told no one.

5. A group of pretty girls and older women followed them.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. and = co-ordinate conjunction; scored = verb; team = subject; the/basketball = adjectives; quickly/easily = adverbs

2. but = co-ordinate conjunction; was = verb; wrestler = subject; individual = predicate nominative; the/a/small/strong = adjectives

3. neither/nor = correlative conjunction; will associate = verb; Helen/family = subjects; with = preposition; us = object of the preposition; her = adjective

4. and/but = co-ordinate conjunctions; went/told = verbs; Jim/Jeff/Shawn = subjects; no one = direct object; to = preposition; Wendover = object of the preposition

5. and = co-ordinate conjunction; followed = verb; group = subject; them = direct object; of = preposition; girls/women = objects of the preposition; a/pretty/older = adjectives.

For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html. Our lessons are also available to purchase in an eBook and a Workbook format.

Tuesday, June 13, 2017

Lesson 202 - Parts of the Sentence - Conjunctions

A conjunction is a word that joins other words, phrases, or clauses. Co-ordinate conjunctions join words, phases, or clauses of equal rank. There are two kinds simple and correlative. The simple co-ordinate conjunctions are the following: and, but, or, and nor. The correlative co-ordinate conjunctions are always in pairs. They are either-or, neither-nor, both-and, not only-but also, and whether-or.

In these lessons simple co-ordinates will be referred to as co-ordinate conjunctions, and correlative co-ordinates will be referred to as correlative conjunctions. The co-ordinate and correlative conjunctions should be memorized since they are common and few in number.

Instructions: As a review of all the parts of the sentence, in the following sentences find the conjunctions and tell whether they are co-ordinate or correlative conjunctions, and then tell how each of the other words are used.

1. Run up the hill and through the valley.

2. I will be waiting for Ann and her family.

3. The clouds were neither large nor billowy.

4. At the convention I saw not only my neighbor but also my cousin.

5. The dog owner called his favorite dogs Laddie and Lady.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. and = co-ordinate conjunction; run = verb; you (understood) = subject; up/through = prepositions; hill/valley = object of the preposition; the/the = adjectives

2. and = co-ordinate conjunction; will be waiting = verb; I = subject; for = preposition; Ann/family = objects of the preposition; her = adjective

3. neither/nor = correlative conjunction; were = verb; clouds = subject; large/billowy = predicate adjectives; the = adjective

4. not only/but also = correlative conjunction; saw = verb; I = subject; neighbor/cousin = direct objects; at = preposition; convention = object of the preposition; the/my/my = adjectives

5. and = co-ordinate conjunction; called = verb; owner = subject; dogs = direct object; Laddie/Lady = object complements; the/dog/his/favorite = adjectives

For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html. Our lessons are also available to purchase in an eBook and a Workbook format.

Monday, June 12, 2017

Lesson 201 - Parts of the Sentence - Conjunctions

A conjunction is a word that joins other words, phrases, or clauses. Co-ordinate conjunctions join words, phases, or clauses of equal rank. There are two kinds simple and correlative. The simple co-ordinate conjunctions are the following: and, but, or, and nor. The correlative co-ordinate conjunctions are always in pairs. They are either-or, neither-nor, both-and, not only-but also, and whether-or.

In these lessons simple co-ordinates will be referred to as co-ordinate conjunctions, and correlative co-ordinates will be referred to as correlative conjunctions. The co-ordinate and correlative conjunctions should be memorized since they are common and few in number.

Instructions: As a review of all the parts of the sentence, in the following sentences find the conjunctions and tell whether they are co-ordinate or correlative conjunctions, and then tell how each of the other words are used.

1. Jeff and Jim cut the grass.

2. Mr. Smith, our neighbor and friend, is visiting Africa.

3. Lindsay gave both Ila and me a surprise.

4. The rabbit hopped and skipped about in the yard.

5. The new manager will be either Bill or Fred.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. and = co-ordinate conjunction; cut = verb; Jeff/Jim = subject; the = adjective

2. and = co-ordinate conjunction; is visiting = verb; Mr. Smith = subject; Africa = direct object; neighbor/friend = appositives; our = adjective

3. both/and = correlative conjunction; gave = verb; Lindsay = subject; surprise = direct object; Ila/me = indirect object; a = adjective

4. and = co-ordinate conjunction; hopped/skipped = verbs; rabbit = subject; the/the = adjectives; in = preposition; yard = object of the preposition

5. either/or = correlative conjunction; will be = verb; manager = subject; Bill/Fred = predicate nominative; the/new = adjectives

For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html. Our lessons are also available to purchase in an eBook and a Workbook format.

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