Saturday, May 13, 2017

Quiz for Lessons 181 - 185 - Parts of the Sentence - Prepositional Phrases

A prepositional phrase may be used as an adjective telling which or what kind and modifying a noun or pronoun. An adjective prepositional phrase will come right after the noun or pronoun that it modifies. If there are two adjective phrases together, one will follow the other. A prepositional phrase may be used as an adverb telling how, when, where, how much, and why and modifying the verb and sometimes an adjective. Adverb prepositional phrases can come anywhere in the sentence and can be moved within the sentence without changing the meaning. Only adjective prepositional phrases modify the object of the preposition in another prepositional phrase. Notice that some prepositional phrases may be adverbs or adjectives because of their location in the sentence.

Instructions: Pick out the prepositional phrases in these sentences, identify what they tell us, and what they modify.

1. The librarian took from her desk a new edition of one of the classics.

2. It was placed in the display case in the corner of the library.

3. Many books of mysteries and detective stories are found in the library.

4. One story about magic appears in our literature book.

5. This story contains clues to the solution of the mystery.

6. I have read many stories by Arthur Conan Doyle about Sherlock Holmes.

7. A wall of ancient Pompeii was discovered accidentally by an ordinary peasant.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. from her desk modifies "took" telling where / of one modifies "edition" telling which / of the classics modifies "one" telling what kind

2. in the display case modifies "was placed" telling where / in the corner modifies "case" telling which / of the library modifies "corner" telling which

3. of mysteries and detective stories modifies "books" telling what kind / in the library modifies "are found" telling where

4. about magic modifies "story" telling what kind / in our literature book modifies "appears" telling where

5. to the solution modifies "clues" telling which / of the mystery modifies "solution" telling which

6. by Arthur Conan Doyle modifies "stories" telling which / about Sherlock Holmes modifies "stories" telling what kind

7. of ancient Pompeii modifies "wall" telling which / by an ordinary peasant modifies "was discovered" telling how

For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html. Our lessons are also available to purchase in an eBook and a Workbook format.

Friday, May 12, 2017

Lesson 185 - Parts of the Sentence - Prepositional Phrases

A prepositional phrase may be used as an adjective telling which or what kind and modifying a noun or pronoun. An adjective prepositional phrase will come right after the noun or pronoun that it modifies. If there are two adjective phrases together, one will follow the other. A prepositional phrase may be used as an adverb telling how, when, where, how much, and why and modifying the verb and sometimes an adjective. Adverb prepositional phrases can come anywhere in the sentence and can be moved within the sentence without changing the meaning. Only adjective prepositional phrases modify the object of the preposition in another prepositional phrase. Notice that some prepositional phrases may be adverbs or adjectives because of their location in the sentence.

Instructions: Pick out the prepositional phrases in these sentences, identify what they tell us, and what they modify.

1. Yesterday many people in Alaska suffered from the heat.

2. During the morning the family drove through the lovely mountains.

3. At noon we ate our lunch at the summit with great excitement.

4. Later our friends and we strolled down the wooded path.

5. The giant hole in the mountain is an unusual monument of our past.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. in Alaska modifies "people" telling which / from the heat modifies "suffered" telling how

2. during the morning modifies "drove" telling when / through the lovely mountains modifies "drove" telling where

3. at noon modifies "ate" telling when / at the summit modifies "ate" telling where / with great excitement modifies "ate" telling how

4. down the wooded path modifies "strolled" telling where

5. in the mountain modifies "hole" telling what kind or which / of our past modifies "monument" telling what kind

For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html. Our lessons are also available to purchase in an eBook and a Workbook format.

Thursday, May 11, 2017

Lesson 184 - Parts of the Sentence - Prepositional Phrases

A prepositional phrase may be used as an adjective telling which or what kind and modifying a noun or pronoun. An adjective prepositional phrase will come right after the noun or pronoun that it modifies. If there are two adjective phrases together, one will follow the other. A prepositional phrase may be used as an adverb telling how, when, where, how much, and why and modifying the verb and sometimes an adjective. Adverb prepositional phrases can come anywhere in the sentence and can be moved within the sentence without changing the meaning. Only adjective prepositional phrases modify the object of the preposition in another prepositional phrase. Notice that some prepositional phrases may be adverbs or adjectives because of their location in the sentence.

Instructions: Pick out the prepositional phrases in these sentences, identify what they tell us, and what they modify.

1. Do you have a reason for your absence from class?

2. The veterans from the war in Spain remained loyal.

3. The class was delighted by the outcome of the story.

4. Dozens of stories about heroes are in the school library.

5. In the afternoon Henrietta went to the library.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. for your absence modifies "reason" telling what kind / from class modifies "absence" telling which

2. from the war modifies "veterans" telling which / in Spain modifies "war" telling which

3. by the outcome modifies "was delighted" telling how or why / of the story modifies "outcome" telling which

4. of stories modifies "dozens" telling what kind / about heroes modifies "stories" telling what kind / in the school library modifies "are" telling where

5. in the afternoon modifies "went" telling when / to the library modifies "went" telling where

For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html. Our lessons are also available to purchase in an eBook and a Workbook format.

Wednesday, May 10, 2017

Lesson 183 - Parts of the Sentence - Prepositional Phrases

A prepositional phrase may be used as an adjective telling which or what kind and modifying a noun or pronoun. An adjective prepositional phrase will come right after the noun or pronoun that it modifies. If there are two adjective phrases together, one will follow the other. A prepositional phrase may be used as an adverb telling how, when, where, how much, and why and modifying the verb and sometimes an adjective. Adverb prepositional phrases can come anywhere in the sentence and can be moved within the sentence without changing the meaning. Only adjective prepositional phrases modify the object of the preposition in another prepositional phrase. Notice that some prepositional phrases may be adverbs or adjectives because of their location in the sentence.

Instructions: Pick out the prepositional phrases in these sentences, identify what they tell us, and what they modify.

1. The real owner of the property is not available for comment.

2. I have no time for your excuses or delays.

3. The manager came for the answer.

4. In this century we are preserving our forests.

5. You will always be one of my best friends.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. of the property modifies "owner" telling which / for comment modifies "available" telling how

2. for your excuses or delays modifies "time" telling what kind

3. for the answer modifies "came" telling why

4. in this century modifies "are preserving" telling when

5. of my best friends modifies "one" telling which

For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html. Our lessons are also available to purchase in an eBook and a Workbook format.

Tuesday, May 9, 2017

Lesson 182 - Parts of the Sentence - Prepositional Phrases

A prepositional phrase may be used as an adjective telling which or what kind and modifying a noun or pronoun. An adjective prepositional phrase will come right after the noun or pronoun that it modifies. If there are two adjective phrases together, one will follow the other. A prepositional phrase may be used as an adverb telling how, when, where, how much, and why and modifying the verb and sometimes an adjective. Adverb prepositional phrases can come anywhere in the sentence and can be moved within the sentence without changing the meaning. Only adjective prepositional phrases modify the object of the preposition in another prepositional phrase.

Instructions: Pick out the prepositional phrases in these sentences, identify what they tell us, and what they modify.

1. The early settlers were very careless of our forests.

2. We divided the candy among the children at the party.

3. I still live in that stucco house in the next block.

4. The rooms of the house were dark and dreary.

5. The sound of whispers came to us through the window.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. of our forests modifies "careless" telling how

2. among the children modifies "divided" telling how / at the party modifies either "children" telling which or "divided" telling where

3. in that stucco house modifies "live" telling where / in the next block modifies "house" telling which

4. of the house modifies "rooms" telling which

5. of whispers modifies "sound" telling what kind / to us modifies "came" telling where / through the window modifies "came" telling how

For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html. Our lessons are also available to purchase in an eBook and a Workbook format.

Monday, May 8, 2017

Lesson 181 - Parts of the Sentence - Prepositional Phrases

A prepositional phrase may be used as an adjective telling which or what kind and modifying a noun or pronoun. An adjective prepositional phrase will come right after the noun or pronoun that it modifies. If there are two adjective phrases together, one will follow the other. A prepositional phrase may be used as an adverb telling how, when, where, how much, and why and modifying the verb and sometimes an adjective. Adverb prepositional phrases can come anywhere in the sentence and can be moved within the sentence without changing the meaning. Only adjective prepositional phrases modify the object of the preposition in another prepositional phrase.

Instructions: Pick out the prepositional phrases in these sentences, identify what they tell us, and what they modify.

1. The boys searched the beach for sand dollars.

2. The grass behind the house and near the fence is dying.

3. A deep ditch was dug near the boundary of the factory.

4. A pretty girl with brown hair and eyes sat near me at the banquet.

5. The three contestants listened carefully to each question.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. for sand dollars modifies "searched" telling why

2. behind the house / near the fence modify "grass" telling which

3. near the boundary modifies "was dug" telling where / of the factory modifies "boundary" telling which

4. with brown hair and eyes modifies "girl" telling what kind / near me / at the banquet modify "sat" telling where

5. to each question modifies "listened" telling how

For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html. Our lessons are also available to purchase in an eBook and a Workbook format.

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