Saturday, February 18, 2017

Quiz for Lessons 126 -130 - Parts of the Sentence - Appositives

Instructions: Identify the appositives in the following sentences and tell whether they are appositives to subjects, direct objects, or predicate nominatives.

1. Rome, the capital of Italy, is a very large city.

2. Have you ever visited Lagoon, our biggest amusement park?

3. The woman with the hat, the viola player, is my sister-in-law.

4. Those women are Elaine and Marilyn, my two sisters.

5. Mr. Gayle, our sponsor, will show you around.


Instructions: Combine the following sentences by using an appositive.

6. Mrs. Karren is greeting the guests. They are possible buyers.

7. Have you met our new foreman? He is the tall man in the coveralls.

8. Watch out for Main Street. It is a very slick road.

9. The Lewises provided the entertainment. They showed home movies.

10. The cargo was very precious. It was gold and silver.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. capital = appositive to the subject, Rome

2. amusement park = appositive to direct object, Lagoon

3. player = appositive to subject, woman

4. sisters = appositive to predicate nominatives. Elaine/Marilyn

5. sponsor = appositive to subject, Mr. Gayle

6. Mrs. Karren is greeting the guests, possible buyers.

7. Have you met our new foreman, the tall man in the coveralls.

8. Watch out for Main Street, a very slick road.

9. The Lewises provided the entertainment, home movies.

10. The cargo, gold and silver, was very precious.

For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html. Our lessons are also available to purchase in an eBook and a Workbook format.

Friday, February 17, 2017

Lesson 130 - Parts of the Sentence - Appositives

An appositive is a word or group of words that identifies or renames the noun or pronoun that it follows. It is set off by commas unless closely tied to the word that it identifies or renames. ("Closely tied" means that it is needed to identify the word.) Examples: My son Carl is a medical technician. (no commas) Badger, our dog with a missing leg, has a love for cats. (commas needed)

Appositives should not be confused with predicate nominatives. A verb will separate the subject from the predicate nominative. An appositive can follow any noun or pronoun including the subject, direct object, or predicate nominative.

You can make one smooth sentence from two short, choppy sentences by using an appositive. Example: Ila won the prize. It was a trip to Hawaii. Ila won the prize, a trip to Hawaii.

Instructions: Combine the following sentences by using an appositive.

1. Sonja sits beside me in English class. She is a girl from Poland.

2. On the deck are many plants. They are very colorful flowers.

3. There goes David. He is the owner of many businesses.

4. For dinner we had my favorite desserts. We had strawberry pie and cherry nut cake.

5. Last night I talked with Leon. He is my neighbor. He is my business partner.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. Sonja, a girl from Poland, sits beside me in English class.

2. On the deck are many plants, very colorful flowers. / On the deck are very colorful flowers, many plants.

3. There goes David, the owner of many businesses.

4. For dinner we had my favorite desserts, strawberry pie and cherry nut cake. / For dinner we had strawberry pie and cherry nut cake, my favorite desserts.

5. Last night I talked with Leon, my neighbor and business partner.

For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html. Our lessons are also available to purchase in an eBook and a Workbook format.

Thursday, February 16, 2017

Lesson 129 - Parts of the Sentence - Appositives

An appositive is a word or group of words that identifies or renames the noun or pronoun that it follows. It is set off by commas unless closely tied to the word that it identifies or renames. ("Closely tied" means that it is needed to identify the word.) Examples: My son Carl is a medical technician. (no commas) Badger, our dog with a missing leg, has a love for cats. (commas needed)

Appositives should not be confused with predicate nominatives. A verb will separate the subject from the predicate nominative. An appositive can follow any noun or pronoun including the subject, direct object, or predicate nominative.

You can make one smooth sentence from two short, choppy sentences by using an appositive. Example: Ila won the prize. It was a trip to Hawaii. Ila won the prize, a trip to Hawaii.

Instructions: Combine the following sentences by using an appositive.

1. Yesterday I saw an exciting movie. It was called Goldeneye.

2. Mr. Jones will be with you shortly. He is the plant manager.

3. That woman is my neighbor. She is a well-known author.

4. Luis can do almost anything. He is a talented person.

5. Do you want to meet Barbara Jean? She is my lab assistant.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. Yesterday I saw an exciting movie, Goldeneye. / Yesterday I saw Goldeneye, an exciting movie.

2. Mr. Jones, the plant manager, will be with you shortly. / The plant manager Mr. Jones will be with you shortly.

3. That woman, a well-known author, is my neighbor. / That woman is my neighbor, a well-known author.

4. Luis, a talented person, can do almost anything.

5. Do you want to meet Barbara Jean, my lab assistant? / Do you want to meet my lab assistant Barbara Jean?

For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html. Our lessons are also available to purchase in an eBook and a Workbook format.

Wednesday, February 15, 2017

Lesson 128 - Parts of the Sentence - Appositives

An appositive is a word or group of words that identifies or renames the noun or pronoun that it follows. It is set off by commas unless closely tied to the word that it identifies or renames. ("Closely tied" means that it is needed to identify the word.) Examples: My son Carl is a medical technician. (no commas) Badger, our dog with a missing leg, has a love for cats. (commas needed)

Appositives should not be confused with predicate nominatives. A verb will separate the subject from the predicate nominative. An appositive can follow any noun or pronoun including the subject, direct object, or predicate nominative.

Appositives may be compound. Example: The two children, Wendy and Sam, are excellent students.

Instructions: Identify the appositives in the following sentences and tell whether they are appositives to subjects, direct objects, or predicate nominatives.

1. Our leading scorer is Michael, the center and captain of the team.

2. These two students, Kay and Eric, are new to our school.

3. The doctor helped two patients, the boy with the broken leg and the girl with a burned arm.

4. Our neighbors, the Smiths and the Fehers, are moving next week.

5. James loves two games, checkers and chess.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. center/captain = appositives to predicate nominative, Michael

2. Kay/Eric = appositives to subject, students

3. boy/girl = appositives to direct objects, patients

4. Smiths/Fehers = appositives to subject, neighbors

5. checkers/chess = appositives to direct object, games

For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html. Our lessons are also available to purchase in an eBook and a Workbook format.

Tuesday, February 14, 2017

Lesson 127 - Parts of the Sentence - Appositives

An appositive is a word or group of words that identifies or renames the noun or pronoun that it follows. It is set off by commas unless closely tied to the word that it identifies or renames. ("Closely tied" means that it is needed to identify the word.) Examples: My son Carl is a medical technician. (no commas) Badger, our dog with a missing leg, has a love for cats. (commas needed)

Appositives should not be confused with predicate nominatives. A verb will separate the subject from the predicate nominative. An appositive can follow any noun or pronoun including the subject, direct object, or predicate nominative.

Instructions: Identify the appositives in the following sentences and tell whether they are appositives to subjects, direct objects, or predicate nominatives.

1. My brother Bill has a cabin in the mountains.

2. Friday, my birthday, will be the thirteenth.

3. Hopping on the fence was a rare bird, the cedar waxwing.

4. This is Fred, an old roommate of mine.

5. Have you seen my car, an old Rambler.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. Bill = appositive to subject, brother

2. birthday = appositive to subject, Friday

3. cedar waxwing = appositive to subject, bird

4. roommate = appositive to predicate nominative, Fred

5. Rambler = appositive to direct object, car

For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html. Our lessons are also available to purchase in an eBook and a Workbook format.

Monday, February 13, 2017

Lesson 126 - Parts of the Sentence - Appositives

An appositive is a word or group of words that identifies or renames the noun or pronoun that it follows. It is set off by commas unless closely tied to the word that it identifies or renames. ("Closely tied" means that it is needed to identify the word.) Examples: My son Carl is a medical technician. (no commas) Badger, our dog with a missing leg, has a love for cats. (commas needed)

Appositives should not be confused with predicate nominatives. A verb will separate the subject from the predicate nominative. An appositive can follow any noun or pronoun including the subject, direct object, or predicate nominative.

Instructions: Identify the appositives in the following sentences and tell whether they are appositives to subjects, direct objects, or predicate nominatives.

1. The neighbor boys, the twins, were excellent baseball players.

2. The girl in the red dress is Sarah, our best actress.

3. Have you read Brothers, a book by Dean Hughes?

4. There goes Grant Long, the electrical contractor.

5. My friend, Matt Matson, collects lost hubcaps.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. twins = appositive to the subject, boys

2. actress = appositive to the predicate nominative, Sarah

3. book = appositive to the direct object, Brothers

4. contractor = appositive to the subject, Grant Long

5. Matt Matson = appositive to the subject, friend

For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html. Our lessons are also available to purchase in an eBook and a Workbook format.

Gadget

This content is not yet available over encrypted connections.