Saturday, January 7, 2017

Quiz for Lessons 96-100 - Parts of the Sentence - Subject/Verb

Instructions: Find the subjects, verbs, interjections, introductory there, and conjunctions in the following sentences. Remember that subjects and verbs can be compound.

1. There were no pies, cakes or cookies on the shelves.

2. Oh, neither Jane nor Tarzan would return to civilization.

3. Barbara and her friends sat on the floor, ate goodies, and listened to records.

4. The brothers swam, fished, and rowed the boat on their vacation.

5. Wow, this lesson is hard but was fun.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. pies, cakes, cookies - subjects; were - verb; there - introductory; or - conjunction

2. Jane, Tarzan - subjects; would return - verb; oh - interjection; neither, nor - conjunction

3. Barbara, friends - subjects; sat, ate, listened - verbs; and, and - conjunctions

4. brothers - subject; swam, fished, rowed - verbs; and - conjunction

5. lesson - subject; is, was - verbs; wow - interjection; but - conjunction

For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html. Our lessons are also available to purchase in an eBook and a Workbook format.

Friday, January 6, 2017

Lesson 100 - Parts of the Sentence - Subject/Verb

Both the subject and the verb can be compound. Example: The bell and the siren rang and rang.

Instructions: Find the subject, verb, and conjunctions in these sentences.

1. The boys and the girls ran and played in the field.

2. She and I stopped and stared at the sight.

3. Both the team and the coach jumped up and yelled with the last out.

4. Jeff, Jed, and Jim will be in school or will be home in bed.

5. Where have Jay and Eric been swimming and hiking?


--For answers scroll down.












Answers:

1. Boys, girls - subjects; ran, played - verbs; and, and - conjunctions

2. She, I - subjects; stopped, stared - verbs; and, and - conjunctions

3. team, coach - subjects; jumped, yelled - verbs; both, and, and - conjunctions

4. Jeff, Jed, Jim - subjects; will be, will be - verbs; and, or - conjunctions

5. Jay, Eric - subjects; have been swimming, (have been) hiking - verbs; and, and - conjunctions

For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html. Our lessons are also available to purchase in an eBook and a Workbook format.

Thursday, January 5, 2017

Lesson 99 - Parts of the Sentence - Subject/Verb

The subject of the sentence can also be compound. Example: The bell and siren rang.

Instructions: Find the subject, verb, and conjunctions in these sentences.

1. Barbara, Ann, and Jeanne came home for the holidays.

2. Either Jim or Jeff will move to the new apartment.

3. Both Pam and her husband love the new baby.

4. You, Joe, and I are in the new play.

5. Mom or Dad will be gone by morning.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. Barbara, Ann, Jeanne - subjects; came - verb; and - conjunction

2. Jim, Jeff - subjects; will move - verb; either, or - conjunctions

3. Pam, husband -subjects; love - verb; both, and - conjunctions

4. you, Joe, I - subjects; are - verb; and - conjunction

5. Mom, Dad - subjects; will be gone - verb; or - conjunction

For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html. Our lessons are also available to purchase in an eBook and a Workbook format.

Wednesday, January 4, 2017

Lesson 98 - Parts of the Sentence - Subject/Verb

Sometimes a sentence can have two or more verbs called a compound verb. A compound verb is joined by either a co-ordinate conjunction or a correlative conjunction. Example: The bell rang and rang.

Instructions: Find the subject, verb/verbs, and conjunctions in these sentences.

1. Carl listened carefully but heard nothing.

2. The car raced down the road and hit a tree.

3. The audience stood and cheered the performance.

4. The men caught, cooked, and ate the fish.

5. Sue either has done the job or will do it now.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. Carl - subject; listened, heard - verbs; but - conjunction

2. car - subject; raced, hit - verbs; and - conjunction

3. audience - subject; stood, cheered - verbs; and - conjunction

4. men - subject; caught, cooked, ate - verbs; and - conjunction

5. Sue - subject; has done, will do - verbs; either, or - conjunction

For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html. Our lessons are also available to purchase in an eBook and a Workbook format.

Tuesday, January 3, 2017

Lesson 97 - Parts of the Sentence - Subject/Verb

Interjections, like the introductory there, do not fit grammatically with the rest of the sentence. They are never the subject. They come at the beginning of a sentence and may be set off with a comma. Example: Oh, I like your new car.

Instructions: Find the subject, verb, and interjections in these sentences.

1. Hey, what are you doing over there?

2. Yes, I would like that very much.

3. Well, Joe did it.

4. Yippee! Our team won the game.

5. Gosh, how did you do that?


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. you - subject, are doing - verb, hey - interjection

2. I - subject, would like - verb, yes - interjection

3. Joe - subject, did - verb, well - interjection

4. team - subject, won - verb, yippee - interjection

5. you - subject, did do - verb, gosh - interjection

For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html. Our lessons are also available to purchase in an eBook and a Workbook format.

Monday, January 2, 2017

Lesson 96 - Parts of the Sentence - Subject/Verb

A simple sentence is a group of words expressing a complete thought, and it must have a subject and a verb (predicate - some grammar books use the word predicate, but I will use verb). A verb shows action or state of being. Examples: The bell rang. The boy is here. The subject tells who or what about the verb. Examples: The bell rang. The boy is here.

There are four (4) kinds of sentences: declarative, imperative, interrogative, and exclamatory.

1. A declarative sentence makes a statement. Example: The assignment is due tomorrow.

2. An imperative sentence gives a command or makes a request. Examples: Hand it in now.

3. An interrogative sentence asks a question. Example: Do you know the man?

4. An exclamatory sentence shows strong feeling. Declarative, imperative, or interrogative sentences can be made into exclamatory sentences by punctuating them with an exclamation point. Examples: The assignment is due tomorrow! Stop! Do you know the man!

When finding the subject and the verb in a sentence, always find the verb first and then say who or what followed by the verb. Example: The bell rang. Find the verb - rang. Now say who or what rang? The bell rang. Bell is the subject.

Some sentences begin with an introductory there. It is never the subject. The subject will always come after the verb in such a sentence. There can also be an adverb. To be an introductory there, it must meet these rules: It must be the first word of a sentence (Sometimes a prepositional phrase out of its normal order can come before it.); It cannot mean where; It must be with a state of being verb. The introductory there doesn't fit grammatically with the rest of the sentence as we will find most other words do. Examples: There is some food in the refrigerator. Is is the verb. Who or what is? Food is. Food is the subject. In the refrigerator there is some food. Moving the prepositional phrase does not change the introductory there.


Instructions: Find the subject and verb in these sentences.

1. There may not be time for an encore.

2. In the mail box, there was no mail.

3. There has been no letter today.

4. There weren't many men at the meeting.

5. In the snow there were many tracks.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. time - subject, may be - verb

2. mail - subject, was - verb

3. letter- subject, has been - verb

4. men - subject, were - verb

5. tracks - subject, were - verb

For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html. Our lessons are also available to purchase in an eBook and a Workbook format.

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