Saturday, January 2, 2016

Quiz for Lessons 331 - 335 - Mechanics - End Punctuation

Use a period to end a declarative sentence.

Use a period to end an imperative sentence. An imperative sentence makes a command or request.

Use a question mark to end an interrogative sentence. An interrogative sentence asks a direct question.

Use an exclamation point to end an exclamatory sentence or any strong exclamation. (A strong exclamation is called an interjection.)

Instructions: Put the needed punctuation in each of these sentences.

1. Don't run out in the street

2. Now is the time to support honesty in all aspects of life

3. Well Here we go again

4. Pay attention, will you

5. Who is that guy walking down the hall

6. He doesn't live here anymore

7. Get out of here

8. Did you bring the money that we need

9. Watch what you are doing

10. I will see you tomorrow


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. Don't run out in the street. (or!)

2. Now is the time to support honesty in all aspects of life. (or!)

3. Well! Here we go again. (or!)

4. Pay attention, will you! (or.)

5. Who is that guy walking down the hall? (or!)

6. He doesn't live here anymore. (or!)

7. Get out of here! (or.)

8. Did you bring the money that we need? (or!)

9. Watch what you are doing. (or!)

10. I will see you tomorrow. (or!)

(Notice how the exclamation point can be used to give added emphasis or feeling to a sentence.)

For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html. Our lessons are also available to purchase in an eBook, a FlipBook, and a Workbook format.

Friday, January 1, 2016

Lesson 335 - Mechanics - End Punctuation

Use a period to end a declarative sentence.

Use a period to end an imperative sentence. An imperative sentence makes a command or request.

Use a question mark to end an interrogative sentence. An interrogative sentence asks a direct question.

Use an exclamation point to end an exclamatory sentence or any strong exclamation. (A strong exclamation is called an interjection.)

Instructions: Put the needed punctuation in each of these sentences.

1. Who will win the debates, Gore or Bush

2. Do your chores and your home work, and then you can play

3. Ouch That hurt

4. I saw most of the Olympic Games on television

5. Did you see the flying saucer


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. Who will win the debates, Gore or Bush?

2. Do your chores and your home work, and then you can play.

3. Ouch! That hurt!

4. I saw most of the Olympic Games on television.

5. Did you see the flying saucer (Either ! or ? depending on how you want it said.)

For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html. Our lessons are also available to purchase in an eBook, a FlipBook, and a Workbook format.

Thursday, December 31, 2015

Lesson 334 - Mechanics - End Punctuation

Use an exclamation point to end an exclamatory sentence or any strong exclamation. (A strong exclamation is called an interjection.) Many exclamations begin with how or what.

Instructions: Put the needed punctuation in each of these sentences.

1. What a game that was

2. Wow Our team won in the last minute

3. How lovely your Christmas decorations are

4. Oh I need to hurry

5. What I did exactly what you asked


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. What a game that was!

2. Wow! Our team won in the last minute!

3. How lovely your Christmas decorations are!

4. Oh! I need to hurry!

5. What! I did exactly what you asked.

(Any sentence can have an exclamation point if you want to say it in that way.)

For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html. Our lessons are also available to purchase in an eBook, a FlipBook, and a Workbook format.

Wednesday, December 30, 2015

Lesson 333 - Mechanics - End Punctuation

Use a question mark to end an interrogative sentence. An interrogative sentence asks a direct question.

Instructions: Put the needed punctuation in each of these sentences.

1. Can anyone see the screen with the movie

2. What have you done to this room

3. Where were you yesterday

4. How can you act in such a terrible manner

5. Who wants to go with me


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1 - 5 - All sentences require a question mark at the end of the sentence.

For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html. Our lessons are also available to purchase in an eBook, a FlipBook, and a Workbook format.

Tuesday, December 29, 2015

Lesson 332 - Mechanics - End Punctuation

Use a period to end an imperative sentence. An imperative sentence makes a command or request.

Instructions: Put the needed punctuation in each of these sentences.

1. Do what you are told

2. Put the dishes in the dish washer

3. Please stop doing that annoying thing

4. Push that stalled car off the road

5. Open your books and start reading


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1 - 5 - All sentences require a period at the end of the sentence.

For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html. Our lessons are also available to purchase in an eBook, a FlipBook, and a Workbook format.

Monday, December 28, 2015

Lesson 331 - Mechanics - End Punctuation

Use a period to end a declarative sentence.

Instructions: Put the needed punctuation in each of these sentences.

1. The sun is shining brightly in the eastern sky

2. Gold has been discovered in various states at different times

3. Those girls go to Orem Junior High School

4. This is a beautiful morning for a hike

5. You may read for the rest of the time


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1 - 5 - All sentences require a period at the end of the sentence.

For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html. Our lessons are also available to purchase in an eBook, a FlipBook, and a Workbook format.

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