Saturday, October 17, 2015

Quiz for Lessons 276 - 280 - Parts of the Sentence - Adjective, Adverb, and Noun Clauses

Instructions: Find the adjective, adverb, or noun clauses in these sentences. If it is an adjective or adverb clause, tell which word it modifies, and if it is a noun clause, tell how if it is used as the subject, predicate nominative, direct object, appositive, indirect object, or object of the preposition.

1. If the manager is unable to help, try the assistant manager.

2. The mayor is the person to whom you should write the letter.

3. The man whose neck was broken has recovered completely.

4. The scientist said that the ozone levels were dangerous.

5. The city council objected when the mayor changed his mind.

6. It is unfortunate that Mr. Jones will not return.

7. Why you don't do your work is ridiculous to me.

8. This cemetery is where your Grandfather is buried.

9. The report that the island is under water is very misleading.

10. We offered whoever told the truth clemency.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. If the manager is unable to help = adverb clause modifying the verb try

2. whom you should write the letter = noun clause used as the object of the preposition

3. whose neck was broken = adjective clause modifying the subject man

4. that the ozone levels were dangerous = noun clause used as the direct object

5. when the mayor changed his mind = adverb clause modifying the verb objected

6. that Mr. Jones will not return = adverb clause modifying the predicate adjective unfortunate

7. Why you don't do your work = noun clause used as the subject

8. where your Grandfather is buried = noun clause used as the predicate nominative

9. that the island is under water = noun clause used as the appositive

10. whoever told the truth = noun clause used as the indirect object

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Friday, October 16, 2015

Lesson 280 - Parts of the Sentence - Adjective, Adverb, and Noun Clauses

The adjective clause is used to modify a noun or a pronoun. It will begin with a relative pronoun (who, whose, whom, which, and that) or a subordinate conjunction (when and where). Those are the only words that can be used to introduce an adjective clause. The introductory word will always rename the word that it follows and modifies except when used with a preposition which will come between the introductory word and the word it renames. Examples: The student whose hand was up gave the wrong answer. Whose hand was up is the adjective clause with whose, the relative pronoun, renaming and modifying student. Jane is a person in whom I can place my confidence. Whom I can place my confidence is the adjective clause with whom, the relative pronoun, with the preposition in between it and person the word that whom renames and
modifies.

An adverb clause is a dependent clause that modifies a verb, adjective or another adverb. It usually modifies the verb.

Adverb clauses are introduced by subordinate conjunctions including after, although, as, as if, before, because, if, since, so that, than, though, unless, until, when, where, and while. These are just some of the more common ones.

Example: They arrived before the game had ended. ("before the game had ended" is the adverb clause modifying the verb arrived telling when.)

A noun clause is a dependent clause that can be used the same ways as a noun or pronoun. It can be a subject, predicate nominative, direct object, appositive, indirect object, or object of the preposition. Some of the words that introduce noun clauses are that, whether, who, why, whom, what, how, when, whoever, where, and whomever. Notice that some of these words also introduce adjective and adverb clauses. (To check a noun clause substitute the pronoun it or the proper form of the pronouns he or she for the noun clause.) Examples: I know who said that. (I know it.) Whoever said it is wrong. (He is wrong.) Sometimes a noun clause is used without the introductory word. Example: I know that he is here. (I know he is here.)

Instructions: Find the adjective, adverb or noun clauses in these sentences. If it is an adjective or adverb clause, tell which word it modifies, and if it is a noun clause, tell if it is used as the subject, predicate nominative, direct object, appositive, indirect object, or object of the preposition.

1. This year was the warmest year that we have had.

2. We waited for hours until we received word of his rescue.

3. The hiker whom I saw on Mount Timpanogos was eighty years old.

4. Mike thinks that he will win the lottery.

5. Who lost this wallet is a mystery to me.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. that we have had = adjective clause modifying the predicate nominative year

2. until we received word of his rescue = adverb clause modifying the verb waited

3. whom I saw on Mount Timpanogos = adjective clause modifying the subject hiker

4. that he will win the lottery = noun clause used as the direct object

5. Who lost this wallet = noun clause used as the subject

For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html. Our lessons are also available to purchase in an eBook, a FlipBook, and a Workbook format.

Thursday, October 15, 2015

Lesson 279 - Parts of the Sentence - Adjective, Adverb, and Noun Clauses

The adjective clause is used to modify a noun or a pronoun. It will begin with a relative pronoun (who, whose, whom, which, and that) or a subordinate conjunction (when and where). Those are the only words that can be used to introduce an adjective clause. The introductory word will always rename the word that it follows and modifies except when used with a preposition which will come between the introductory word and the word it renames. Examples: The student whose hand was up gave the wrong answer. Whose hand was up is the adjective clause with whose, the relative pronoun, renaming and modifying student. Jane is a person in whom I can place my confidence. Whom I can place my confidence is the adjective clause with whom, the relative pronoun, with the preposition in between it and person the word that whom renames and modifies.

An adverb clause is a dependent clause that modifies a verb, adjective or another adverb. It usually modifies the verb.

Adverb clauses are introduced by subordinate conjunctions including after, although, as, as if, before, because, if, since, so that, than, though, unless, until, when, where, and while. These are just some of the more common ones.

Example: They arrived before the game had ended. ("before the game had ended" is the adverb clause modifying the verb arrived telling when.)

A noun clause is a dependent clause that can be used the same ways as a noun or pronoun. It can be a subject, predicate nominative, direct object, appositive, indirect object, or object of the preposition. Some of the words that introduce noun clauses are that, whether, who, why, whom, what, how, when, whoever, where, and whomever. Notice that some of these words also introduce adjective and adverb clauses. (To check a noun clause substitute the pronoun it or the proper form of the pronouns he or she for the noun clause.) Examples: I know who said that. (I know it.) Whoever said it is wrong. (He is wrong.) Sometimes a noun clause is used without the introductory word. Example: I know that he is here. (I know he is here.)

Instructions: Find the adjective, adverb or noun clauses in these sentences. If it is an adjective or adverb clause, tell which word it modifies, and if it is a noun clause, tell if it is used as the subject, predicate nominative, direct object, appositive, indirect object, or object of the preposition.

1. That the tiger was gentle and tame was not certain.

2. Do not use that comb which has no teeth.

3. If the treaty is signed, the President will leave at once.

4. Patty explained how embalming is done.

5. Jack asked why the game had been canceled.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. That the tiger was gentle and tame = noun clause used as the subject

2. which has no teeth = adjective clause modifying the direct object comb

3. If the treaty is signed = adverb clause modifying the verb will leave

4. how embalming is done = noun clause used as the direct object

5. why the game had been canceled = noun clause used as the direct object

For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html. Our lessons are also available to purchase in an eBook, a FlipBook, and a Workbook format.

Wednesday, October 14, 2015

Lesson 278 - Parts of the Sentence - Adjective, Adverb, and Noun Clauses

The adjective clause is used to modify a noun or a pronoun. It will begin with a relative pronoun (who, whose, whom, which, and that) or a subordinate conjunction (when and where). Those are the only words that can be used to introduce an adjective clause. The introductory word will always rename the word that it follows and modifies except when used with a preposition which will come between the introductory word and the word it renames. Examples: The student whose hand was up gave the wrong answer. Whose hand was up is the adjective clause with whose, the relative pronoun, renaming and modifying student. Jane is a person in whom I can place my confidence. Whom I can place my confidence is the adjective clause with whom, the relative pronoun, with the preposition in between it and person the word that whom renames and modifies.

An adverb clause is a dependent clause that modifies a verb, adjective or another adverb. It usually modifies the verb.

Adverb clauses are introduced by subordinate conjunctions including after, although, as, as if, before, because, if, since, so that, than, though, unless, until, when, where, and while. These are just some of the more common ones.

Example: They arrived before the game had ended. ("before the game had ended" is the adverb clause modifying the verb arrived telling when.)

A noun clause is a dependent clause that can be used the same ways as a noun or pronoun. It can be a subject, predicate nominative, direct object, appositive, indirect object, or object of the preposition. Some of the words that introduce noun clauses are that, whether, who, why, whom, what, how, when, whoever, where, and whomever. Notice that some of these words also introduce adjective and adverb clauses. (To check a noun clause substitute the pronoun it or the proper form of the pronouns he or she for the noun clause.) Examples: I know who said that. (I know it.) Whoever said it is wrong. (He is wrong.) Sometimes a noun clause is used without the introductory word. Example: I know that he is here. (I know he is here.)

Instructions: Find the adjective, adverb or noun clauses in these sentences. If it is an adjective or adverb clause, tell which word it modifies, and if it is a noun clause, tell if it is used as the subject, predicate nominative, direct object, appositive, indirect object, or object of the preposition.

1. Then I learned the truth, that I had been cheated.

2. The trick that he played on me was not funny.

3. He hopes that he can learn to ski.

4. It is obvious that you want no help.

5. The truth is that freedom is not free.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. that I had been cheated = noun clause used as the appositive

2. that he played on me = adjective clause modifying the subject trick

3. that he can learn to ski = noun clause used as the direct object

4. that you want no help = adverb clause modifying the predicate adjective obvious

5. that freedom is not free = noun clause used as the predicate nominative

For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html. Our lessons are also available to purchase in an eBook, a FlipBook, and a Workbook format.

Tuesday, October 13, 2015

Lesson 277 - Parts of the Sentence - Adjective, Adverb, and Noun Clauses

The adjective clause is used to modify a noun or a pronoun. It will begin with a relative pronoun (who, whose, whom, which, and that) or a subordinate conjunction (when and where). Those are the only words that can be used to introduce an adjective clause. The introductory word will always rename the word that it follows and modifies except when used with a preposition which will come between the introductory word and the word it renames. Examples: The student whose hand was up gave the wrong answer. Whose hand was up is the adjective clause with whose, the relative pronoun, renaming and modifying student. Jane is a person in whom I can place my confidence. Whom I can place my confidence is the adjective clause with whom, the relative pronoun, with the preposition in between it and person the word that whom renames and modifies.

An adverb clause is a dependent clause that modifies a verb, adjective or another adverb. It usually modifies the verb.

Adverb clauses are introduced by subordinate conjunctions including after, although, as, as if, before, because, if, since, so that, than, though, unless, until, when, where, and while. These are just some of the more common ones.

Example: They arrived before the game had ended. ("before the game had ended" is the adverb clause modifying the verb arrived telling when.)

A noun clause is a dependent clause that can be used the same ways as a noun or pronoun. It can be a subject, predicate nominative, direct object, appositive, indirect object, or object of the preposition. Some of the words that introduce noun clauses are that, whether, who, why, whom, what, how, when, whoever, where, and whomever. Notice that some of these words also introduce adjective and adverb clauses. (To check a noun clause substitute the pronoun it or the proper form of the pronouns he or she for the noun clause.) Examples: I know who said that. (I know it.) Whoever said it is wrong. (He is wrong.) Sometimes a noun clause is used without the introductory word. Example: I know that he is here. (I know he is here.)

Instructions: Find the adjective, adverb or noun clauses in these sentences. If it is an adjective or adverb clause, tell which word it modifies, and if it is a noun clause, tell if it is used as the subject, predicate nominative, direct object, appositive, indirect object, or object of the preposition.

1. You can make a shirt from whatever material I don't use.

2. What the audience wanted was another selection.

3. Whenever Barbara does well, she is really excited.

4. The boy was working faster than I could.

5. I gave whoever wanted one a pamphlet.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. whatever material I don't use = noun clause used as the object of the preposition

2. What the audience wanted = noun clause used as the subject

3. Whenever Barbara does well = adverb clause modifying the predicate adjective excited

4. than I could (work fast) = adverb clause modifying the adverb faster

5. whoever wanted one = noun clause used as an indirect object

Next Lesson

For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html. Our lessons are also available to purchase in an eBook, a FlipBook, and a Workbook format.

Monday, October 12, 2015

Lesson 276 - Parts of the Sentence - Adjective, Adverb, and Noun Clauses

The adjective clause is used to modify a noun or a pronoun. It will begin with a relative pronoun (who, whose, whom, which, and that) or a subordinate conjunction (when and where). Those are the only words that can be used to introduce an adjective clause. The introductory word will always rename the word that it follows and modifies except when used with a preposition which will come between the introductory word and the word it renames. Examples: The student whose hand was up gave the wrong answer. Whose hand was up is the adjective clause with whose, the relative pronoun, renaming and modifying student. Jane is a person in whom I can place my confidence. Whom I can place my confidence is the adjective clause with whom, the relative pronoun, with the preposition in between it and person the word that whom renames and modifies.

An adverb clause is a dependent clause that modifies a verb, adjective or another adverb. It usually modifies the verb.

Adverb clauses are introduced by subordinate conjunctions including after, although, as, as if, before, because, if, since, so that, than, though, unless, until, when, where, and while. These are just some of the more common ones.

Example: They arrived before the game had ended. ("before the game had ended" is the adverb clause modifying the verb arrived telling when.)

A noun clause is a dependent clause that can be used the same ways as a noun or pronoun. It can be a subject, predicate nominative, direct object, appositive, indirect object, or object of the preposition. Some of the words that introduce noun clauses are that, whether, who, why, whom, what, how, when, whoever, where, and whomever. Notice that some of these words also introduce adjective and adverb clauses. (To check a noun clause substitute the pronoun it or the proper form of the pronouns he or she for the noun clause.) Examples: I know who said that. (I know it.) Whoever said it is wrong. (He is wrong.) Sometimes a noun clause is used without the introductory word. Example: I know that he is here. (I know he is here.)

Instructions: Find the adjective, adverb, or noun clauses in these sentences.  If it is an adjective or adverb clause, tell which word it modifies, and if it is a noun clause, tell if it is used as the subject, predicate nominative, direct object, appositive, indirect object, or object of the preposition.

1. Donna is my mother-in-law who died several years ago.

2. Atlantic City is where the Boardwalk is located.

3. The man had another back operation because he ruptured another disk.

4. A nurse can find a job wherever she goes.

5. Now I understand why you didn't want to attend.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. who died several year ago = adjective clause modifying the predicate nominative mother-in-law

2. where the Boardwalk is located = noun clause used as the predicate nominative

3. because he ruptured another disk = adverb clause modifying the verb had

4. wherever she goes = adverb clause modifying the verb can find

5. why you didn't want to attend = noun clause used as the direct object

For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html. Our lessons are also available to purchase in an eBook, a FlipBook, and a Workbook format.

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