Saturday, October 10, 2015

Quiz for Lessons 271 - 275 - Parts of the Sentence - Noun Clauses

Instructions: Find the noun clauses in the following sentences and tell how they are used.  (Subject, predicate nominative, direct object, appositive, indirect object, or object of the preposition)

1. How the prisoner escaped is a mystery.

2. My feeling is that the robbery was an inside job.

3. Everyone is wondering how he could just disappear.

4. The news that he had escaped frightened the whole town.

5. The police have offered whoever finds the stolen diamonds a reward.

6. The family has had no word about where he might be.

7. That we were ready to go was a miracle.

8. Give whoever wants to go a ride to the game.

9. That you are losing ground was evident from the polls.

10. Whoever injured the handicapped woman must be feeling guilty.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. How the prisoner escaped = subject

2. that the robbery was an inside job = predicate nominative

3. how he could just disappear = direct object

4. that he had escaped = appositive

5. whoever finds the stolen diamonds = indirect object

6. where he might be = object of the preposition

7. That we were ready to go = subject

8. whoever wants to go = indirect object

9. That you are losing ground = subject

10. Whoever injured the handicapped woman = subject

For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html. Our lessons are also available to purchase in an eBook, a FlipBook, and a Workbook format.

Friday, October 9, 2015

Lesson 275 - Parts of the Sentence - Noun Clauses

A noun clause is a dependent clause that can be used in the same way as a noun or pronoun. It can be a subject, predicate nominative, direct object, appositive, indirect object, or object of the preposition. Some of the words that introduce noun clauses are that, whether, who, why, whom, what, how, when, whoever, where, and whomever. Notice that some of these words also introduce adjective and adverb clauses. (To check a noun clause substitute the pronoun it or the proper form of the pronouns he or she for the noun clause.) Examples: I know who said that. (I know it.) Whoever said it is wrong. (He is wrong.) Sometimes a noun clause is used without the introductory word. Example: I know that he is here. (I know he is here.)

Instructions: Find the noun clauses in the following sentences and tell how they are used. (Subject, predicate nominative, direct object, appositive, indirect object, or object of the preposition)

1. We will send the money to whoever asks for it.

2. Do you know how dynamite is made?

3. My hope that we visit Mount Rushmore is now a family idea.

4. His difficulty is that he cannot read.

5. Whoever said that is totally incorrect.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. whoever asks for it = object of the preposition

2. how dynamite is made = direct object

3. that we visit Mount Rushmore = appositive

4. that he cannot read = predicate nominative

5. Whoever said that = subject

For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html. Our lessons are also available to purchase in an eBook, a FlipBook, and a Workbook format.

Thursday, October 8, 2015

Lesson 274 - Parts of the Sentence - Noun Clauses

A noun clause is a dependent clause that can be used in the same way as a noun or pronoun. It can be a subject, predicate nominative, direct object, appositive, indirect object, or object of the preposition. Some of the words that introduce noun clauses are that, whether, who, why, whom, what, how, when, whoever, where, and whomever. Notice that some of these words also introduce adjective and adverb clauses. (To check a noun clause substitute the pronoun it or the proper form of the pronouns he or she for the noun clause.) Examples: I know who said that. (I know it.) Whoever said it is wrong. (He is wrong.) Sometimes a noun clause is used without the introductory word. Example: I know that he is here. (I know he is here.)

Instructions: Find the noun clauses in the following sentences and tell how they are used. (Subject, predicate nominative, direct object, appositive, indirect object, or object of the preposition)

1. That he is an honest man cannot be denied.

2. Give whoever can prove ownership the money.

3. I have no opinion about who caused the problem.

4. He knows that he should be long-suffering.

5. A short vacation is what the family is planning.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. That he is an honest man = subject

2. whoever can prove ownership = indirect object

3. who caused the problem = object of the preposition

4. that he should be long-suffering = direct object

5. what the family is planning = predicate nominative

For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html. Our lessons are also available to purchase in an eBook, a FlipBook, and a Workbook format.

Wednesday, October 7, 2015

Lesson 273 - Parts of the Sentence - Noun Clauses

A noun clause is a dependent clause that can be used in the same way as a noun or pronoun. It can be a subject, predicate nominative, direct object, appositive, indirect object, or object of the preposition. Some of the words that introduce noun clauses are that, whether, who, why, whom, what, how, when, whoever, where, and whomever. Notice that some of these words also introduce adjective and adverb clauses. (To check a noun clause substitute the pronoun it or the proper form of the pronouns he or she for the noun clause.) Examples: I know who said that. (I know it.) Whoever said it is wrong. (He is wrong.) Sometimes a noun clause is used without the introductory word. Example: I know that he is here. (I know he is here.)

Instructions: Find the noun clauses in the following sentences and tell how they are used.  (Subject, predicate nominative, direct object, appositive, indirect object, or object of the preposition)

1. Jeff's plea that he might buy a car was denied.

2. Give whoever calls first the prize.

3. Do you know why those people are protesting?

4. His excuse is that he was ill this morning.

5. Send on this secret mission whoever is the best qualified.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. that he might buy a car = appositive

2. whoever calls first = indirect object

3. why those people are protesting = direct object

4. that he was ill this morning = predicate nominative

5. whoever is the best qualified = direct object

For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html. Our lessons are also available to purchase in an eBook, a FlipBook, and a Workbook format.

Tuesday, October 6, 2015

Lesson 272 - Parts of the Sentence - Noun Clauses

A noun clause is a dependent clause that can be used in the same way as a noun or pronoun. It can be a subject, predicate nominative, direct object, appositive, indirect object, or object of the preposition. Some of the words that introduce noun clauses are that, whether, who, why, whom, what, how, when, whoever, where, and whomever. Notice that some of these words also introduce adjective and adverb clauses. (To check a noun clause substitute the pronoun it or the proper form of the pronouns he or she for the noun clause.) Examples: I know who said that. (I know it.) Whoever said it is wrong. (He is wrong.) Sometimes a noun clause is used without the introductory word. Example: I know that he is here. (I know he is here.)

Instructions: Find the noun clauses in the following sentences and tell how they are used. (Subject, predicate nominative, direct object, appositive, indirect object, or object of the preposition)

1. I do not know where he is going to stay.

2. How rich I am should concern no one except me.

3. That I should get a haircut is Mother's idea.

4. I wonder where my shoes are.

5. The money goes to whoever wins the race.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. where he is going to stay = direct object

2. How rich I am = subject

3. That I should get a haircut = subject

4. where my shoes are = direct object

5. whoever wins the race = object of the preposition

For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html. Our lessons are also available to purchase in an eBook, a FlipBook, and a Workbook format.

Monday, October 5, 2015

Lesson 271 - Parts of the Sentence - Noun Clauses

A noun clause is a dependent clause that can be used in the same way as a noun or pronoun. It can be a subject, predicate nominative, direct object, appositive, indirect object, or object of the preposition. Some of the words that introduce noun clauses are that, whether, who, why, whom, what, how, when, whoever, where, and whomever. Notice that some of these words also introduce adjective and adverb clauses. (To check a noun clause substitute the pronoun it or the proper form of the pronouns he or she for the noun clause.) Examples: I know who said that. (I know it.) Whoever said it is wrong. (He is wrong.) Sometimes a noun clause is used without the introductory word. Example: I know that he is here. (I know he is here.)

Instructions: Find the noun clauses in the following sentences and tell how they are used. (Subject, predicate nominative, direct object, appositive, indirect object, or object of the preposition)

1. One should profit from what he sees and learns.

2. Her idea that I hire you was a very good one.

3. We wonder what your plans for the trip are.

4. My hope is that we may visit in Boston.

5. Why you did not hire me is hard to comprehend.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. what he sees and learns = object of the preposition

2. that I hire you = appositive

3. what your plans for the trip are = direct object

4. that we may visit in Boston = predicate nominative

5. Why you did not hire me = subject

For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html. Our lessons are also available to purchase in an eBook, a FlipBook, and a Workbook format.

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