Saturday, August 1, 2015

Quiz for Lessons 221 - 225 - Parts of the Sentence - Verbals - Participles/Adjective Infinitives

Instructions: Find the infinitives, participles, and the participial and infinitive phrases in these sentences and tell what word they modify.

1. My attempts to comfort the lost boy were useless.

2. Having been left behind, the puppy gave a whining howl.

3. The exhausted men were given the signal to start the march.

4. The admired musician wants a person to study with him.

5. The screaming fans cheered their fighting team.

6. The droning lecture caused the students' heads to nod.

7. Having finished our work, we now had time to play.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. to comfort the lost boy modifies attempts; lost modifies boy

2. Having been left behind modifies puppy; whining modifies howl

3. exhausted modifies men; to start the march modifies signal

4. admired modifies musician; to study with him modifies person

5. screaming modifies fans; fighting modifies team

6. droning modifies lecture; to nod modifies heads

7. Having finished our work modifies we; to play modifies time

For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html. Our lessons are also available to purchase in an eBook, a FlipBook, and a Workbook format.

Friday, July 31, 2015

Lesson 225 - Parts of the Sentence - Verbals - Participles/Adjective Infinitives

A participle is used as an adjective and ends in various ways. A present participle always ends with ing as does the gerund, but remember that it is an adjective. A past participle ends with ed, n, or irregularly. Examples: played, broken, brought, sung, seeing, having seen, being seen, seen, having been seen. Participles modify nouns and pronouns and can precede or follow the word modified. (Do not confuse participles that end in ing with gerunds. Participles are used as adjectives; gerunds are used as nouns.)

A participial phrase is made up of a participle and any complements (direct objects, predicate nominatives, predicate adjectives, or modifiers) like the gerund. A participial phrase that comes at the beginning of the sentence is always followed by a comma and modifies the subject of the sentence.

An infinitive is to plus a verb form. It can be used as an adjective. Examples: to be, to see, to be seen, to be eaten.

An infinitive phrase is made up of an infinitive and any complements (direct objects, predicate nominatives, predicate adjectives, or modifiers) like the gerund. An infinitive phrase that comes at the beginning of the sentence is always followed by a comma and modifies the subject of the sentence.

Instructions: Find the participles and the participial and infinitive phrases in these sentences and tell what word they modify.

1. The money lying on the dresser is yours.

2. The crying child awakened everyone.

3. The heavy package to be sent was quickly loaded.

4. Hearing the noise, the girl was suddenly afraid.

5. There are several things to be considered first.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. lying on the dresser modifies money

2. crying modifies child

3. to be sent modifies package

4. Hearing the noise modifies girl

5. to be considered first modifies things

For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html. Our lessons are also available to purchase in an eBook, a FlipBook, and a Workbook format.

Thursday, July 30, 2015

Lesson 224 - Parts of the Sentence - Verbals - Adjective Infinitives

An infinitive is to plus a verb form. It can be used as an adjective. Examples: to be, to see, to be seen, to be eaten.

An infinitive phrase is made up of an infinitive and any complements (direct objects, predicate nominatives, predicate adjectives, or modifiers) like the gerund. An infinitive phrase that comes at the beginning of the sentence is always followed by a comma and modifies the subject of the sentence.

Instructions: Find the infinitive phrases in these sentences and tell what word they modify.

1. Your idea to spend the day together sounds great.

2. Joe is the man to see about the job.

3. We have no reason to doubt your sincerity.

4. This must be the best route to take.

5. Your attitude is the best attitude to have.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. to spend the day together modifies idea

2. to see about the job modifies man

3. to doubt your sincerity modifies reason

4. to take modifies route

5. to have modifies attitude

For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html. Our lessons are also available to purchase in an eBook, a FlipBook, and a Workbook format.

Wednesday, July 29, 2015

Lesson 223 - Parts of the Sentence - Verbals - Participles

A participle is used as an adjective and ends in various ways. A present participle always ends with ing as does the gerund, but remember that it is an adjective. A past participle ends with ed, n, or irregularly. Examples: played, broken, brought, sung, seeing, having seen, being seen, seen, having been seen. Participles modify nouns and pronouns and can precede or follow the word modified. (Do not confuse participles that end in ing with gerunds. Participles are used as adjectives; gerunds are used as nouns.)

A participial phrase is made up of a participle and any complements (direct objects, predicate nominatives, predicate adjectives, or modifiers) like the gerund. A participial phrase that comes at the beginning of the sentence is always followed by a comma and modifies the subject of the sentence.

Instructions: Find the participial phrases in these sentences and tell what word they modify.

1. The man running slowly still finished the race.

2. The boy having been scolded finally did his work.

3. The teacher, having retired, could now travel widely.

4. The soldier, having saluted his superior, continued on his way.

5. The truck swerving and sliding hit the brick wall.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. running slowly modifies man

2. having been scolded modifies boy

3. having retired modifies teacher

4. having saluted his superior modifies soldier

5. swerving and sliding modifies truck

For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html. Our lessons are also available to purchase in an eBook, a FlipBook, and a Workbook format.

Tuesday, July 28, 2015

Lesson 222 - Parts of the Sentence - Verbals - Participles

A participle is used as an adjective and ends in various ways. A present participle always ends with ing as does the gerund, but remember that it is an adjective. A past participle ends with ed, n, or irregularly. Examples: played, broken, brought, sung, seeing, having seen, being seen, seen, having been seen. Participles modify nouns and pronouns and can precede or follow the word modified. (Do not confuse participles that end in ing with gerunds. Participles are used as adjectives; gerunds are used as nouns.)

A participial phrase is made up of a participle and any complements (direct objects, predicate nominatives, predicate adjectives, or modifiers) like the gerund. A participial phrase that comes at the beginning of the sentence is always followed by a comma and modifies the subject of the sentence.

Instructions: Find the participial phrases in these sentences and tell what word they modify.

1. Taking my time, I hit the basket.

2. Shouting angrily, the man chased the thief.

3. Exhausted from the hike, Jim dropped to the ground.

4. Grinning sheepishly, the boy asked for a date.

5. Trying to open the gate, I tore my coat.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. Taking my time modifies the subject I

2. Shouting angrily modifies the subject man

3. Exhausted from the hike modifies the subject Jim

4. Grinning sheepishly modifies the subject boy

5. Trying to open the gate modifies the subject I

For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html. Our lessons are also available to purchase in an eBook, a FlipBook, and a Workbook format.

Monday, July 27, 2015

Lesson 221 - Parts of the Sentence - Verbals - Participles

A participle is used as an adjective and ends in various ways. A present participle always ends with ing as does the gerund, but remember that it is an adjective. A past participle ends with ed, n, or irregularly. Examples: played, broken, brought, sung, seeing, having seen, being seen, seen, having been seen. Participles modify nouns and pronouns and can precede or follow the word modified. (Do not confuse participles that end in ing with gerunds. Participles are used as adjectives; gerunds are used as nouns.)

Instructions: Find the participles in these sentences and tell what word they modify.

1. The bike had a broken spoke.

2. Her smiling face made everyone happy.

3. The frightened child was crying loudly.

4. The people were frightened by the growling dog.

5. The squeaking wheel needs some grease.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. broken modifying spoke

2. smiling modifying face

3. frightened modifying child

4. growling modifying dog

5. squeaking modifying wheel

For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html. Our lessons are also available to purchase in an eBook, a FlipBook, and a Workbook format.

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